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Anit-skid paint

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  • John Dalziel
    Howdy all, I am re-doing part of the deck (Dynel over ply) of an AS 29, and am wondering if anyone has tried Sherwin Williams Sharktooth anti- slip compound
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 25, 2001
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      Howdy all,

      I am re-doing part of the deck (Dynel over ply) of an AS 29, and am
      wondering if anyone has tried Sherwin Williams "Sharktooth" anti-
      slip compound and can give a report.

      Or, if anyone has a recommendation for something else that works
      well, and has continued to work for a reasonable length of time.

      Thanks!

      John Dalziel
      ____________
      "I've raised two children that respect discipline"
      ~ George W. Bush, 1994
    • Hannes
      john, I just use fine sand sprinkled over the first undercoat while still wet. don t use too much, or it will be absolutely non-skid but do the same to your
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 28, 2001
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        john,
        I just use fine sand sprinkled over the first undercoat while still wet.
        don't use too much, or it will be absolutely non-skid but do the
        same to your knees sandpaper does (surprise).
        i use a small sieve from the kitchen. try to apply half as much as
        you think is necessary. you can always add some with the next
        coat.
        takes a bit of time though

        hannes
      • jamesjjstumpf@aol.com
        In a message dated 7/28/2001 3:08:51 PM Eastern Daylight Time, ... I second the sand option. Local paint and hardware stores carry skidtex which is very fine
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 28, 2001
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          In a message dated 7/28/2001 3:08:51 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
          h.kuehtreiber@... writes:


          > I just use fine sand sprinkled over the first undercoat while still wet.
          > don't use too much, or it will be absolutely nonskid but do the
          >

          I second the sand option. Local paint and hardware stores carry skidtex
          which is very fine silica sand. I find that mixing the sand with the base
          coat with a paint mixer chucked in a cordless drill is very effective. I
          like to mask the perimeter to create a smooth boarder then pour the slushy
          mixture on the surface to be covered then drag/roll it out with a small foam
          roller. Keep the mixture well mixed and watch to see that you are get the
          sand evenly spread. I have done this with one part urethane paints and have
          had very good results.

          Jim Stumpf


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Harry W. James
          I use the same method, except I mask out the area I want the antiskid on, rather than trying to antiskid the whole area. It looks neater. You have to do a
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 28, 2001
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            I use the same method, except I mask out the area I want the
            antiskid on, rather than trying to antiskid the whole area.
            It looks neater. You have to do a antiskid only coat this
            way after the first coat dries so it takes longer.

            HJ

            Hannes wrote:
            >
            > john,
            > I just use fine sand sprinkled over the first undercoat while still wet.
            > don't use too much, or it will be absolutely non-skid but do the
            > same to your knees sandpaper does (surprise).
            > i use a small sieve from the kitchen. try to apply half as much as
            > you think is necessary. you can always add some with the next
            > coat.
            > takes a bit of time though
            >
            > hannes
            >
            >
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