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FLARED SIDES

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  • jfouser@yahoo.com
    Well I Knew some bugger would come out of the closet to blow me an ill wind over that one, but Bolger hisself admits that in later sharpies he has designed the
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 1 9:41 AM
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      Well I Knew some bugger would come out of the closet to blow me an
      ill wind over that one, but Bolger hisself admits that in later
      sharpies he has designed the little flare they have is consetion to
      fashion.
      Julian
    • staehpj1@home.com
      I won t presume to agree or disagree with any opinion about whether Bolger could or would have designed the Pelican. There are a number of reasons, including
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 1 2:20 PM
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        I won't presume to agree or disagree with any opinion about whether
        Bolger could or would have designed the Pelican. There are a number
        of reasons, including the following:

        I am not an expert on bolger designs (or any other designs
        for that matter).

        I consider that kind of argument to be somewhat pointless.

        That said I must say that I don't see where you (Julian) are coming
        from on this one.

        First, of all Bolger has designed boats with a LOT of flare. Not
        only a little added as a concession to fashion. Do you honestly
        think he added flare to the Glouchester Gull for fashion? That
        notion is absurd. Ditto for Teal, Windsprint, and many others. I
        think I read a quote where he said he earned his ticket to heaven by
        designing the Gull, so he must have been pretty happy with at least
        one of his highly flared designs.

        What do you mean when you say, "Pelican is just an inlargment of what
        has been around for long time anyway." That just seems like a cheap
        shot that could be taken at any designer, including Bolger.

        Pelican has been around for a long time itself (1959), and just what
        is it an enlargment of?

        Even Bolgers's boats, as original as they are, borrow very heavily
        from others that came before. He didn't invent the sharpie after all.

        I don't want to start a flame war or anything, but your comments just
        didn't make sense to me.

        Pete
      • stephen@paskey.net
        ... from others that came before. He didn t invent the sharpie after all. *** Not only that, but Bolger apparently was not the first to design sharpies with
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 1 9:27 PM
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          --- In bolger@y..., staehpj1@h... wrote:
          > Even Bolgers's boats, as original as they are, borrow very heavily
          from others that came before. He didn't invent the sharpie after all.

          *** Not only that, but Bolger apparently was not the first to design
          sharpies with no flare at all.

          I'm quoting here from Howard Chapelle's "Chesapeake Bay Crabbing
          Skiffs," a small booklet published by the Chesapeake Bay Maritime
          Museum. Chapelle describes an unusual "flattie" skiff (flat-bottomed
          forward, with deadrise aft) from Smith Island, Maryland, which had
          tumblehome amidships. In other words, the sheer amidships was
          narrower than the chine. Some watermen thought the design, with its
          very sharp chine, helped the boat get to windward in very shallow
          water. (Chapelle was skeptical.)

          Chapelle then adds this remark: "Because of the success of this
          particular model, many watermen are convinced that flare is harmful
          to speed in sailing craft and so A NUMBER OF WALL-SIDED SKIFFS HAVE
          DEVELOPED; these are, in general, dangerous boats in blowing weather."

          Wall-sided skiffs?

          Stephen
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