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drilling lead

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  • djost@ma.ultranet.com
    Dear Group, I have recently been predrilling holes for my #12 bronze nails into the lead. After breaking 4 titanium drill bits I realize that I must be
    Message 1 of 11 , May 2 8:51 AM
      Dear Group,
      I have recently been predrilling holes for my #12 bronze nails
      into the lead. After breaking 4 titanium drill bits I realize that I
      must be missing something.
      The drill pierces the material readily but then grabs and digs too
      aggresively. I can only salvage the drill bit with major reverse
      pressure on the drilling operation. I tried light machine oil on the
      bit(s), but with the same results.
      What am I missing?

      David Jost
      "spending way too much on drill bits"
    • John Bell
      I read somewhere, maybe Bernie s old CSD newsletters, that you should dip your drill bit in kerosene to keep it from grabbing. I d test it on the Micro keel
      Message 2 of 11 , May 2 6:14 PM
        I read somewhere, maybe Bernie's old CSD newsletters, that you should "dip
        your drill bit in kerosene" to keep it from grabbing.

        I'd test it on the Micro keel that's laying on my back patio, but I don't
        have any kerosene. Sorry.


        JB

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: <djost@...>
        To: <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wednesday, May 02, 2001 2:38 PM
        Subject: [bolger] drilling lead


        | Dear Group,
        | I keep breaking drill bits while drilling into the lead keel. The
        | drills start, but then grab and dig too aggresively to a point where
        | they get stuck and then break. I have tried applying oil to the drill
        | tip, but the same thing happens. This is getting expensive.
        | Any ideas?
        | The lead is about 3% antimony which makes it easier to handle but
        | harder to drill.
        |
        | David Jost
        | "going broke on a very small boat"
        |
        |
        |
        | Bolger rules!!!
        | - no cursing, flaming, trolling, or spamming
        | - no flogging dead horses
        | - add something: take "thanks!" and "ditto!" posts off-list.
        | - stay on topic and punctuate
        | - add your comments at the TOP and SIGN your posts
        | - To order plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA,
        01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
        |
        |
        | Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        |
        |
      • Lincoln Ross
        I suspect you need another type of drill bit. You could go to a machinist s supply place and ask for advice. Maybe more flutes or something. Or you could find
        Message 3 of 11 , May 2 6:38 PM
          I suspect you need another type of drill bit. You could go to a machinist's supply place and ask for advice. Maybe more flutes or something. Or you could find McMaster Carr on the web and look thru their amazing catalog. You just have to convince them you are a company. Or, locally, maybe MSC has a web presence these days? I have their catalog if you are stumped. I think a bit that is meant for plastic might actually work. Regular bits on plastic tend to be grabby, too.

          If you could control the feed rate, I bet you could keep the bits from breaking.

          I think the titanium bits are just steel with a titanium nitride coating. Probably not stronger, just stay sharp longer.

          Another thing to try is getting cheapie drill bits and grinding them to a shallower angle. Maybe even just freehand. What have you got to lose?

          --- In bolger@y..., djost@m... wrote:
          > Dear Group,
          > I have recently been predrilling holes for my #12 bronze nails
          > into the lead. After breaking 4 titanium drill bits I realize that I
          > must be missing something.
          > The drill pierces the material readily but then grabs and digs too
          > aggresively. I can only salvage the drill bit with major reverse
          > pressure on the drilling operation. I tried light machine oil on the
          > bit(s), but with the same results.
          > What am I missing?
          >
          > David Jost
          > "spending way too much on drill bits"
        • Phil Smith
          ... Try less pressure and more RPMs. Phil Smith
          Message 4 of 11 , May 2 7:16 PM
            djost@... wrote:
            >
            > Dear Group,
            > I keep breaking drill bits while drilling into the lead keel. The
            > drills start, but then grab and dig too aggresively to a point where
            > they get stuck and then break. I have tried applying oil to the drill
            > tip, but the same thing happens. This is getting expensive.
            > Any ideas?
            > The lead is about 3% antimony which makes it easier to handle but
            > harder to drill.

            Try less pressure and more RPMs.

            Phil Smith
          • staehpj1@home.com
            I seem to vaugely remember that if you use less relief angle when sharpening the drill bit, it will prevent this. It would require regrinding the bit, so I
            Message 5 of 11 , May 3 5:29 AM
              I seem to vaugely remember that if you use less relief angle when
              sharpening the drill bit, it will prevent this. It would require
              regrinding the bit, so I would try the kerosene first unless you are
              good a grinding tool bits.

              Can anyone confirm my recollection?
            • richard@spellingbusiness.com
              You could freeze it, like this guy: http://www.ionet.net/~mmyc/drillead.htm To drill aluminum, I use anti-freeze for lube. Also, be sure to pull the bit out
              Message 6 of 11 , May 3 6:35 AM
                You could freeze it, like this guy:
                http://www.ionet.net/~mmyc/drillead.htm

                To drill aluminum, I use anti-freeze for lube.

                Also, be sure to pull the bit out often to shake the chips off.

                I was joking about the freezing, but quite possibly your bit is
                getting hot enough to melt the lead to the bit.

                Keep the bit cool. Go slow, use lots of lube, and shake the chips off
                often.

                I have the same problem with aluminum if I go to fast. It will weld
                to the drill bit.
                --- In bolger@y..., Dan Freidus <freidus@w...> wrote:
                > Yes, a different bit is the answer. Changing the relief angle
                would help
                > some by making the bit less aggressive. You might also try a thin
                web
                > drill since it leaves more room for chips to move but, of course,
                these
                > bits are weaker. There may be other options, too. I think using
                cutting
                > fluid is probably the best thign to try first. I strongly recommend
                > against kerosene because of both the fire and environmental risks.
                THere
                > are much safer cutting fluids now that don't cost a fortune.
                >
                > Try calling Victor Machinery Exchange. Great service, great prices
                (okay,
                > it's my brother so I've got a bias, but I used to own it with him
                and
                > customer service and low prices have always been strong points.)
                They're
                > at 800-723-5359 or 251 Centre St in lower Manhattan if you happen
                to be
                > in NYC. THey're on the web too, but I have to admit that I don't
                think the
                > web site is nearly as good as the company is in general.
                > http://www.victornet.com
                >
                > If you want their catalog, just go to the web site or call and ask
                for one.
                >
                > Dan Freidus
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > At 1:38 AM -0000 5/3/01, Lincoln Ross wrote:
                > >I suspect you need another type of drill bit. You could go to a
                > >machinist's supply place and ask for advice. Maybe more flutes or
                > >something. Or you could find McMaster Carr on the web and look
                thru their
                > >amazing catalog. You just have to convince them you are a company.
                Or,
                > >locally, maybe MSC has a web presence these days? I have their
                catalog if
                > >you are stumped. I think a bit that is meant for plastic might
                actually
                > >work. Regular bits on plastic tend to be grabby, too.
                > >
                > >If you could control the feed rate, I bet you could keep the bits
                from
                > >breaking.
                > >
                > >I think the titanium bits are just steel with a titanium nitride
                coating.
                > >Probably not stronger, just stay sharp longer.
                > >
                > >Another thing to try is getting cheapie drill bits and grinding
                them to a
                > >shallower angle. Maybe even just freehand. What have you got to
                lose?
                > >
                > >--- In bolger@y..., djost@m... wrote:
                > >> Dear Group,
                > >> I have recently been predrilling holes for my #12 bronze nails
                > >> into the lead. After breaking 4 titanium drill bits I realize
                that I
                > >> must be missing something.
                > >> The drill pierces the material readily but then grabs and
                digs too
                > >> aggresively. I can only salvage the drill bit with major reverse
                > >> pressure on the drilling operation. I tried light machine oil
                on the
                > >> bit(s), but with the same results.
                > >> What am I missing?
                > >>
                > >> David Jost
                > >> "spending way too much on drill bits"
                > >
                > >
                > >Bolger rules!!!
                > >- no cursing, flaming, trolling, or spamming
                > >- no flogging dead horses
                > >- add something: take "thanks!" and "ditto!" posts off-list.
                > >- stay on topic and punctuate
                > >- add your comments at the TOP and SIGN your posts
                > >- To order plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester,
                MA,
                > >01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
                > >
                > >
                > >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              • pongo19050@yahoo.com
                Are you going to attach plywood sheathing to the lead? I used wood screws with no predrilling of the lead, which seemed to work. The srews seem to really
                Message 7 of 11 , May 3 7:09 AM
                  Are you going to attach plywood sheathing to the lead? I used wood
                  screws with no predrilling of the lead, which seemed to work. The
                  srews seem to really grab the lead. I've also used automotive
                  antifreeze in a squirt bottle when drilling in other metals.

                  Regards

                  Andy Farquhar
                • Dan Freidus
                  Yes, a different bit is the answer. Changing the relief angle would help some by making the bit less aggressive. You might also try a thin web drill since it
                  Message 8 of 11 , May 3 7:17 AM
                    Yes, a different bit is the answer. Changing the relief angle would help
                    some by making the bit less aggressive. You might also try a thin web
                    drill since it leaves more room for chips to move but, of course, these
                    bits are weaker. There may be other options, too. I think using cutting
                    fluid is probably the best thign to try first. I strongly recommend
                    against kerosene because of both the fire and environmental risks. THere
                    are much safer cutting fluids now that don't cost a fortune.

                    Try calling Victor Machinery Exchange. Great service, great prices (okay,
                    it's my brother so I've got a bias, but I used to own it with him and
                    customer service and low prices have always been strong points.) They're
                    at 800-723-5359 or 251 Centre St in lower Manhattan if you happen to be
                    in NYC. THey're on the web too, but I have to admit that I don't think the
                    web site is nearly as good as the company is in general.
                    http://www.victornet.com

                    If you want their catalog, just go to the web site or call and ask for one.

                    Dan Freidus




                    At 1:38 AM -0000 5/3/01, Lincoln Ross wrote:
                    >I suspect you need another type of drill bit. You could go to a
                    >machinist's supply place and ask for advice. Maybe more flutes or
                    >something. Or you could find McMaster Carr on the web and look thru their
                    >amazing catalog. You just have to convince them you are a company. Or,
                    >locally, maybe MSC has a web presence these days? I have their catalog if
                    >you are stumped. I think a bit that is meant for plastic might actually
                    >work. Regular bits on plastic tend to be grabby, too.
                    >
                    >If you could control the feed rate, I bet you could keep the bits from
                    >breaking.
                    >
                    >I think the titanium bits are just steel with a titanium nitride coating.
                    >Probably not stronger, just stay sharp longer.
                    >
                    >Another thing to try is getting cheapie drill bits and grinding them to a
                    >shallower angle. Maybe even just freehand. What have you got to lose?
                    >
                    >--- In bolger@y..., djost@m... wrote:
                    >> Dear Group,
                    >> I have recently been predrilling holes for my #12 bronze nails
                    >> into the lead. After breaking 4 titanium drill bits I realize that I
                    >> must be missing something.
                    >> The drill pierces the material readily but then grabs and digs too
                    >> aggresively. I can only salvage the drill bit with major reverse
                    >> pressure on the drilling operation. I tried light machine oil on the
                    >> bit(s), but with the same results.
                    >> What am I missing?
                    >>
                    >> David Jost
                    >> "spending way too much on drill bits"
                    >
                    >
                    >Bolger rules!!!
                    >- no cursing, flaming, trolling, or spamming
                    >- no flogging dead horses
                    >- add something: take "thanks!" and "ditto!" posts off-list.
                    >- stay on topic and punctuate
                    >- add your comments at the TOP and SIGN your posts
                    >- To order plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA,
                    >01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
                    >
                    >
                    >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  • tetherin@jersey.net
                    I tried cutting lead with a circular saw and found that the blade kept grabbibg after a second or two. Finally figured out that the lead was melting and then
                    Message 9 of 11 , May 3 11:11 AM
                      I tried cutting lead with a circular saw and found that the blade
                      kept grabbibg after a second or two. Finally figured out that the
                      lead was melting and then solidifying on the blade. I'd bet that
                      your drill bits are melting the lead and adhereing to it. I'd try
                      going slower, using lubrication to reduce friction and letting the
                      bits cool between holes.

                      I should be in your situation in about a month if all goes well.


                      --- In bolger@y..., djost@m... wrote:
                      > Dear Group,
                      > I have recently been predrilling holes for my #12 bronze
                      nails
                      > into the lead. After breaking 4 titanium drill bits I realize that
                      I
                      > must be missing something.
                      > The drill pierces the material readily but then grabs and
                      digs too
                      > aggresively.
                      > "spending way too much on drill bits"
                    • micwal_va@hotmail.com
                      The odds are that you are trning the bit too fast. The ideal speed would be less than 750 rpms. Go to a plumbing or electrical supply store and get some
                      Message 10 of 11 , May 3 4:20 PM
                        The odds are that you are trning the bit too fast. The ideal speed
                        would be less than 750 rpms. Go to a plumbing or electrical supply
                        store and get some cutting oil....it is the best way to go. Both
                        should have oil for thread cutters used in plumbing or heavy duty
                        conduit for electricans.

                        Keep the speed down you are likely soldering the bit to the hole.
                      • Wade Leftwich
                        You can buy a coolant / lube that machinists use, but WD40 works fine. Slow the bit down, and keep spraying the stuff into the hole as you drill. ... Message:
                        Message 11 of 11 , May 4 7:22 AM
                          You can buy a coolant / lube that machinists use, but WD40 works fine. Slow
                          the bit down, and keep spraying the stuff into the hole as you drill.


                          ------------------------------------

                          Message: 9
                          Date: Thu, 03 May 2001 18:11:55 -0000
                          From: tetherin@...
                          Subject: Re: drilling lead

                          I tried cutting lead with a circular saw and found that the blade
                          kept grabbibg after a second or two. Finally figured out that the
                          lead was melting and then solidifying on the blade. I'd bet that
                          your drill bits are melting the lead and adhereing to it. I'd try
                          going slower, using lubrication to reduce friction and letting the
                          bits cool between holes.
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