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divine inspiration

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  • djost@ma.ultranet.com
    Ok, in keeping with the current discussion on Bolger politics, libertarianism etc... I know he would disapprove of divinely inspired boatbuilding. but it
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 30, 2001
      Ok, in keeping with the current discussion on Bolger politics,
      libertarianism etc... I know he would disapprove of divinely
      inspired boatbuilding. but it happens. . .

      While listening to the sermon on Sunday, I figured out a quick a
      clever way to get that darned 400 lb. lead keel in place. Today
      after work, I tried it out and the keel is in place and ready for
      sheathing and glass work. This makes the idea divinely inspired. I
      may have to raise my church pledge if this continues.

      1. I placed the keel flat on the starboard side of the cradle under
      the boat.

      2. I attached vertical 1.5" square posts from the port side of the
      keel batten to the cradle. This serves to capture the keel as it is
      lifted to its vertical state.

      3. The keel is lifed with a hydraulic floor jack to vertical.

      4. I temporarily secured more vertical posts on the starboard side
      of the keel batten. The keel can't fall over, but can be slid fore
      and aft.

      5. The keel is positioned in place and screws from the port side to
      the lead hold it in place while the starboard sheathing is drilled
      and fit dry. Next to apply epoxy and nail it shut. the process is
      repeated on the other side and then the whole assembly will be
      sheathed with 6 oz. glass.

      This whole process of lifting and positioning took under an hour with
      no heavy labor.

      David Jost
      "celebrating the moment with a fine Czech pilsner"
    • KF4call@aol.com
      Wonderful...I m going to save it so I remember the procedure. Any objection if I publish it to the Oldshoe builders group?...the Oldshoe has a lead keed
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 30, 2001
        Wonderful...I'm going to save it so I remember the procedure.

        Any objection if I publish it to the Oldshoe builders group?...the Oldshoe
        has a lead keed installed in a similar manner to that of Micro only it weighs
        in at 200lbs, quite a bit lighter.
        Regards,
        Warren

        >>Ok, in keeping with the current discussion on Bolger politics,
        libertarianism etc... I know he would disapprove of divinely
        inspired boatbuilding. but it happens. . .

        While listening to the sermon on Sunday, I figured out a quick a
        clever way to get that darned 400 lb. lead keel in place. Today
        after work, I tried it out and the keel is in place and ready for
        sheathing and glass work. This makes the idea divinely inspired. I
        may have to raise my church pledge if this continues.

        1. I placed the keel flat on the starboard side of the cradle under
        the boat.

        2. I attached vertical 1.5" square posts from the port side of the
        keel batten to the cradle. This serves to capture the keel as it is
        lifted to its vertical state.

        3. The keel is lifed with a hydraulic floor jack to vertical.

        4. I temporarily secured more vertical posts on the starboard side
        of the keel batten. The keel can't fall over, but can be slid fore
        and aft.

        5. The keel is positioned in place and screws from the port side to
        the lead hold it in place while the starboard sheathing is drilled
        and fit dry. Next to apply epoxy and nail it shut. the process is
        repeated on the other side and then the whole assembly will be
        sheathed with 6 oz. glass.

        This whole process of lifting and positioning took under an hour with
        no heavy labor.

        David Jost
        "celebrating the moment with a fine Czech pilsner">>
      • djost@ma.ultranet.com
        ... no problem Warren, remember that free advise only worth what you paid for it. At 200lbs, I would think that it would be a great deal easier, even if you
        Message 3 of 5 , May 1, 2001
          --- In bolger@y..., KF4call@a... wrote:
          > Wonderful...I'm going to save it so I remember the procedure.
          >
          > Any objection if I publish it to the Oldshoe builders group?...the Oldshoe
          > has a lead keed installed in a similar manner to that of Micro only it weighs
          > in at 200lbs, quite a bit lighter.
          > Regards,
          > Warren
          >
          no problem Warren, remember that free advise only worth what you paid
          for it. At 200lbs, I would think that it would be a great deal
          easier, even if you were to try to lift the keel into a pre-formed
          pocket. But the way I did it does not involve jacking the boat way up
          in the air which is impossible in my garage due to the electric door
          closer being in the way.
          I did check with a large T square to be sure that it is not set up
          askew.

          Good Luck with your project
          David Jost
        • Michael Surface
          David Remember Noah! ... _________________________________________________________________ Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com
          Message 4 of 5 , May 1, 2001
            David

            Remember Noah!


            >From: djost@...
            >Reply-To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
            >To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
            >Subject: [bolger] divine inspiration
            >Date: Tue, 01 May 2001 01:52:59 -0000
            >
            >Ok, in keeping with the current discussion on Bolger politics,
            >libertarianism etc... I know he would disapprove of divinely
            >inspired boatbuilding. but it happens. . .
            >
            >While listening to the sermon on Sunday, I figured out a quick a
            >clever way to get that darned 400 lb. lead keel in place. Today
            >after work, I tried it out and the keel is in place and ready for
            >sheathing and glass work. This makes the idea divinely inspired. I
            >may have to raise my church pledge if this continues.
            >
            >1. I placed the keel flat on the starboard side of the cradle under
            >the boat.
            >
            >2. I attached vertical 1.5" square posts from the port side of the
            >keel batten to the cradle. This serves to capture the keel as it is
            >lifted to its vertical state.
            >
            >3. The keel is lifed with a hydraulic floor jack to vertical.
            >
            >4. I temporarily secured more vertical posts on the starboard side
            >of the keel batten. The keel can't fall over, but can be slid fore
            >and aft.
            >
            >5. The keel is positioned in place and screws from the port side to
            >the lead hold it in place while the starboard sheathing is drilled
            >and fit dry. Next to apply epoxy and nail it shut. the process is
            >repeated on the other side and then the whole assembly will be
            >sheathed with 6 oz. glass.
            >
            >This whole process of lifting and positioning took under an hour with
            >no heavy labor.
            >
            >David Jost
            > "celebrating the moment with a fine Czech pilsner"
            >
            >

            _________________________________________________________________
            Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com
          • djost@ma.ultranet.com
            ... Yes, I know that Noah was the first boatbuilder of noteable fame. He was an amateur and today could not become a licenced naval architect, go figure. We
            Message 5 of 5 , May 1, 2001
              --- In bolger@y..., "Michael Surface" <msurface@h...> wrote:
              > David
              >
              > Remember Noah!
              >
              Yes, I know that Noah was the first boatbuilder of noteable fame. He
              was an amateur and today could not become a licenced naval architect,
              go figure. We also know that Jesus walked on water to visit the
              fishermen. We do not know what kind of boat they were in as the
              details are sketchy, but I bet that it was similar to the clam skiff.
              (there got Bolger boats in!).

              David Jost
              "Leaving work early to epoxy"
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