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Weldwood

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  • mzeiger@hotmail.com
    I ve seen the curdling spoken of, but that usually means I ve been impatient, and need to mix the glue better. This is where a lot of experience with making
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 21 9:57 PM
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      I've seen the curdling spoken of, but that usually means I've been
      impatient, and need to mix the glue better. This is where a lot of
      experience with making chocolate milk with powder in one's youth comes
      in very handy. If you don't get the curdles and lumps out, your joint
      will usually not hold, although I've gone ahead with semi-lumpy glue a
      time or two and most of those joints are still good.

      The temperature recommendations on the label need not be adhered to
      (yak! couldn't resist) so faithfully. I've used Weldwood in my shop
      where the floor temperatures can be down to the high 50s or lower
      during the dry time. Allowing longer clamping time, I've had good
      strong bonds in 40 degrees and below. The directions on labels are, I
      believe, crafted to ensure the best possible results so that you'll
      swear by the product and tell all your friends they have to as well.
      There's a wide range of tolerances beyond that. If that weren't the
      case, most of the boat building products, including virtually all
      glues and paint, could not be used here in Alaska, where if the
      temperature's right, the humidity's usually wrong.

      I wouldn't necessarily write off a product after one bad experience.
      It's just as possible to starve an epoxy joint and have your project
      fall to pieces as it is to mismix the powdered glue. I use epoxy when
      I need to fill the gaps, and try to use Weldwood for the rest, just to
      keep the costs down.

      Mark Z.
      Juneau, Alaska
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