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69783Re: [bolger] Re: #501 35' sailing scow houseboat

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  • Scot McPherson
    Aug 20 11:41 AM
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      My opinion and opinion only is if you are looking for a boat to live aboard and long term liveabosrd cruise with. Which is what an Armageddon boat really is, you need one of the overly sturdy designs. Boats designed to be beached for servicing rather than relying on docking facilities, and can be serviced by carving lumber out of a tree with an adze, hatchets and hand powers saws. For that you might want to look at bhueler designs.

      They are heavy and slow, but designed to live through hurricanes, and be beached for hull repairs.

      They are not unsinkable though. Unsinkable ships by their very design trade offs are not suitable blue water vessels, at least not for long trips.

      Scot McPherson, PMP CISSP MCSA
      Old Lyme, CT
      Sent from my iPhone

      On Aug 20, 2013, at 12:35 PM, "Peter" <pvanderwaart@...> wrote:

       

      > It is not so much to establish a PROOF of CONCEPT of the sailing scow,
      > but to prove that such a boat could be a permanent family shelter,
      > and can be moved to a new location under her own power if needed.
      > My vision was that in case of national emergency, or a disaster
      > of whatever origin, a family could be evacuated, and safely and
      > comfortably sheltered, by grounding on a beach or sitting on the
      > mud, working the tides.

      I'm not sure what you think needs proving. People have lived on boats for centuries. Like this:

      http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4137/4899292823_1f2c4cbcef_z.jpg

      Also barges in European canals, and numerous American cruisers, etc.

      It would be much quicker and possibly cheaper to get a down-at-the-heels, used, fiberglass cruiser, possibly a center cockpit sloop built for the charter trades. After a hose down, and delousing the mattresses, you can move aboard and refurbish the engine and rig at your leisure.

      Don't get me wrong; I'm a big fan of #501. It's a remarkably clever design, as you will find out if you try to make any facile changes. But it's not meant as a voyaging boat, and I doubt it's a good choice for out-running the apocalypse. PCB designed some other boats that would be better for that, but the requirements for going to see cause them to be more difficult to build.

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