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69310Re: [bolger] Re: Seaworthyness and stability Long Micro?

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  • phil.bolger
    Feb 6 9:09 AM
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      Gruetzi !
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: stoffersg
      Sent: Wednesday, February 06, 2013 11:59 AM
      Subject: [bolger] Re: Seaworthyness and stability Long Micro?

       

      Hi

      I thank you for all the answers up to now. I will think about that and look around for what and how my future boat shall be...;-)

      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, wrote:
      >
      > On the issue of reefing MICRO or LONG MICRO, we explicitly offered as one option the fully-battened gaff-main version for easy pull-down per panel convenience. Different strokes for different folks. But not an issue that would de facto 'condemn' either MICRO in terms of safety in rising winds.
      >
      > Susanne Altenburger, PB&F
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: dnjost
      > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Wednesday, February 06, 2013 9:58 AM
      > Subject: [bolger] Re: Seaworthyness and stability Long Micro?
      >
      >
      >
      > Interesting thread.
      >
      > My old Micro would heave to quite nicely for reefing. I just lashed sheeted the mizzen in full, and then eased the main, the boat would head up just a little off the wind with the boom within easy reach for doing the reefing. My sail was on a track with a reefing hook attached, so it could be done quickly from the cockpit without the need to go forward. Perhaps the extra length of the Long Micro causes things to act differently.
      >
      > David Jost
      >
      > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "William" wrote:
      > >
      > > Pat,
      > > Laying a hull would entail dropping the main and mizzen and sitting on your hands. The boat should settle 90 degrees off the wind. I would lash the tiller, since it tends to bang around. But I do not lay a hull. The limited research on boat in severe storms indicates that laying a hull is less ideal than heaving too (boat is more likely to broach/roll/sink). I also think the LM's hull (flat bottom) would roll and pitch quite a bit and might not be comfortable sitting beam ends to the waves.
      > > Heaving to can be accomplished by sheeting the mizzen tight. The bow will drop off the wind and settle to about 45 degrees off the wind. I've hove to in winds around 15 knots and seen my LM drift backwards at around .5 knots. Again, lashing the tiller would be prudent. I've never been in conditions so serious that I had to heave to, but if I do, my plan is to heave to. I've also contemplated using a bucket on a line, cleated to the bow, as a sea anchor if required to slow the drift. All of this is really just idle contemplation since I'll never have my LM is some off-shore gale. But it is fun to think about in the privacy of the privy. And for clarification's sake (in case someone is wondering), forereaching is different from heaving to and laying a hull.
      > >
      > > Pat. What have you tried? What works? What doesn't?
      > > Bill
      > >
      > > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Pat wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Hi Bill
      > > >
      > > > Could you outline your procedure for laying a hull?
      > > > Thanks
      > > > Pat
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Sent from my iPad
      > > >
      > >
      >

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