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63905Re: [bolger] Re: Single Gaff Halyards

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  • Bruce Hallman
    Jul 9 2:12 PM
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      On Fri, Jul 9, 2010 at 1:32 PM, adventures_in_astrophotography
      <jon@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > Hi Bruce,
      >
      > > Doesn't the Solent lug rig (famous with the original simple
      > > Birdwatcher) have a single halyard gaff? So, that makes me guess that
      > > the variable is both the length of the gaff in combination with the
      > > angle of the gaff. (IOW, the more vertical the angle, the longer it
      > > can be sustained with a single halyard.)
      >
      > Actually, since the Solent lug is a "lug" rig, it has a yard, not a gaff. As far as I know, all lug sails have yards, and only gaff sails have gaffs (among sails at least). It is true, however, that some lug sails have peak halyards, such as PCB applied to control the yard of his dipping lug.
      >
      > Jon
      >


      You are revealing my ignorance of sailing rig part names. In my self
      oriented vocabulary (which is likely not correct) I just looked it up
      in the Oxford English Dictionary and see that a "yard" is properly
      defined as:

      "A wooden (or steel) spar, comparatively long and slender, slung at
      its centre from, and forward of, a mast and serving to support and
      extend a square sail which is bent to it."

      And, the solent lug rig doesn't hang forward of the mast.

      The OED defines "gaff" as: "A spar used in ships to extend the heads
      of fore-and-aft sails which are not set on stays"

      So, I think that says that all yards are gaffs, but not all gaffs are
      yards. (Yards must extent forward of the mast?)

      So, I think I am seeing the OED say that the spar at the head of the
      solent lug sail should be called a gaff.

      And, OED defines "lug-sail" as: "A four-cornered sail, bent upon a
      yard which is slung at about one-third or one-fourth of its length
      from one end, and so hangs obliquely."
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