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63520Re: Walkure

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  • otter55806
    May 3, 2010
      This makes me think back to the late 70's when I was trying to decide which boat to build and, amoung others, read Colvin's boooks. He wrote about how foolish it is for people to have boats bigger than they need for themselves. I can't remember exactly, but he said something to the effect that you only have that kind of company 10% of the time, but are stuck with the bigger boat all the time for just that 10%. The bigger boat cost more to start with (usually) needs a lot more square feet of sail, which sells by the square foot, a bigger engine needing more fuel, marinas rent by the foot, a lot more boat to maintaine which cost more even if you maintain it yourself. Unless you are independetly wealthy why try to have ANYTHING bigger than YOU need. This is true for homes also. If friends want to visit they can stay in a motel at night and go day sailing with you as all boats can daysail a lot more than they can sleep.
      I live in a one bedroom apt. If friends aren't Ok with sleeping on a pad on the living room floor and need a room of their own, they can go to the motel.
      I decided a Robert's Spray 28 was all I needed, this was an era when almost all the well known world cruisers were on boats of 30' or less. When people also lived in homes half the size of the ones people NEED nowdays. I had an aquaintance in a boatbuilding club who had the dream of living aboard. After listening to his wife he started out thinking 40 feet for the family of four, which I thought was already bigger than needed. Then the wife started in about needing this or that and it became 50 feet. At which point she said that was too big to handle with just the two of them (the kids being too young)so they needed room for crew. So he started building a 60 footer. I lost track and don't know if he ever finished it or not and think the whole thing was that his wife figured that now the project was so big she would never have to go:) By the time such a huge boat would be finished the kids would now be teenagers and would not want to go away from school and their friends and now the boat would probably be too big.
      Bob

      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Michael Wagner <willers32@...> wrote:
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      > I estimate Walkure's displacement at about 8,000 # without trailer. I do not own a car or truck and do not intend to ever do so again. To have a custom trailer built is beyond my budget at this time. If someone in the family is willing & able, that is a good solution.
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      > As to the ocean ability of the AS-29, I'm sure it can be done, but then people cross oceans in rowboats. There is a certain level of insanity required to do that. Yeah, maybe compared to other boats this size, she'd be OK, but I would t take a boat this size across an ocean. In my opinion, the AS-29 is simply not an ocean capable boat. The boat does not handle large seas well at all. The blunt bow causes the boat to just about stop dead when heading into anything bigger than a 3 or 4 foot sea, and the flat bottom/shallow rudder combination will not track at all in a following sea. The new skeg helps, but the boat just won't handle well in rough seas. Also, for longer passages, a bit more speed would be handy.
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      > I once had a lengthy discussion with Susanne and Phil about taking an AS-29 and modifying it for ocean travel. Susanne had some great ideas for adding on a pointy forward section and reinforcing the hull, adding more flotation, etc. Apparently she also thought the AS-29, as it exists, is not really a good ocean boat.
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      > I've made several significant crossings in the Gulf of Mexico and that is the limit of what I think this boat is capable of. She's a great boat for inland rivers, lakes, the ICW and modest coastal trips. She's the perfect boat for gunkholing in the Keys. We love the boat, but just don't feel comfortable making longer passages. The "new" boat is just over twice the displacement, carries 7,000# ballast, draws 9' with the board down. Even then, I wouldn't cross the Pacific. As I said, there is just a certain level of insanity needed and I'm not there yet.
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      > As for living space, the AS-29 is adequate for two people. Bev and I have been quite comfortable for almost 4 years. But as we expand our horizons and our circle of friends & family who visit, it just gets too cramped with 4 people on board. The "new" boat has two staterooms so having two couples on board is a lot more comfortable than on the 29.
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      > --- On Sun, 5/2/10, eric14850 <eric14850@...> wrote:
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      > From: eric14850 <eric14850@...>
      > Subject: [bolger] Re: Walkure
      > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Sunday, May 2, 2010, 9:04 AM
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      > Mike,
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      > An AS-29 weighs what? ROGUE and trailer are 8,000 lbs. I tow ROGUE with a pickup truck. I can manage to launch ROGUE at deep water launch ramps (4') by using a tongue extender. Parked in the back yard, there are no storage fees, and it is easy to keep an eye on the winter cover. That will cut down on some of the expenses if your family decides to take over your boat.
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      > Quoting you, "we are now talking about cruises to the Carribean, Mexico,
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      > Belize, Panama, etc. and this boat is just a wee bit too small, light and flat bottomed for that kind of cruising." ROGUE has a nearly identical interior as an AS-29 so I understand being too small for extensive cruising/permanent live aboard. Why is light and flat bottomed a problem? I would expect the AS-29 to be as good an ocean boat as any boat of similar size. Please explain.
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      > Eric
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