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63011Re: Stitch & Glue Gloucester Light Dory - The real answer

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  • proaconstrictor
    Feb 6, 2010
      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Murray" <ugoigotoo@...> wrote:
      >
      > I reread the part about chine options in Dynamite's booklet again today and he suggests fastening the bottom to the hull while on the molds. He didn't think it would be too difficult as you can securely fasten it to the stem and transom and there isn't much curve to the bottom. Then, He suggests sanding off the joint, rounding it and covering the bottom with fiberglass. After that is done it is possible to remove the hull from the molds, flip it over and fillet and glass the interior hull/bottom joints. So, like you say it's not really a stitch and glue as this method would depend on using the molds to form the hull as Harry suggests.
      >
      > As has also been mentioned, it may be worth a call to Dynamite to see if he can shed any light on building it as a straight-up s&g boat. That would appear to be a little more straightforward than having to build the molds and a ladder jig.
      >
      > I appreciate everybody sharing their opinions with me. Thank-you very much
      >
      > Now, maybe I should ask if this boat would be suitable for what I want to use it for....
      >
      > We have a cabin at a small lake 90 minutes from Saskatoon SK. I am always up early at the lake and would like a rowboat to get out on the water while most people are sleeping. I have a Michalak Ladybug that I built in 2008 but it isn't a rowboat and there is generally no wind in the morning so I can't take it for a sail. I think I got out for early morning sails twice last summer. So, I want a rowboat that is light and easy to launch and retrieve from the water, will row well and quietly and allow me to enjoy the lake before the daily onslaught of powerboats. I may occasionally have a passenger or two.
      >
      > Is the GLD a good boat for my intended use?
      >
      > The Devlin boat is longer. Sam says it is faster. It has the option of installing a sliding seat if I want to really get into rowing. Does anybody have experience with the Oarling and how it would compare to the GLD for this usage?
      >
      > Cheers,
      >
      > Murray
      >
      >
      >
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      >
      >
      > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "proaconstrictor" <proaconstrictor@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Eliminating chine logs doesn't make it stitch and glue, it makes it a boat with epoxy/liquid joinery. I have done that with most of my Bolgers. I also eliminate the draggy (I suppose, never built one) outside chine arrangement. The outside chine is there to make the boat easier to clean, but with a tapped interior joint it amounts to the same thing. Come to think of it I did once row a Payson built GLD, and it rowed fine, with I presume the outside chine.
      > >
      > > One thing is that his three piece boats, the boxes and dories depend on the chine to fully pop out the sides, they may be a little limp without the chine logs there. On the octagonal section ones like Nymph the 45 degree angles will pop out nicely.
      > >
      > > What I do when building one of the chine log boats, I I leave it in, then I nail the bottom to it, then when I flip the boat, I bog the inside joint with a 1.5" radius filleting knife made out of some 1/4" plywood. I then lay some tape in there, and smooth it out into the epoxy with my gloved hand and wet the tape out with a disposible blush (keep it in a can with an inch of acetone in the bottom and a lid. One can reuse the same brush all summer, and no cleaning, except for working excess glue out before it goes into the bath).
      > >
      > > Then just flip the boat upside down, use a jigsaw, or router with a bearing guide, or a grinder, etc... to remove the chine (no permanent screws were used to mount it). I round over the external chine with the grinder, until some of the epoxy fillet from the inside peaks through. Keep the lines of ply and fillet nice and smooth, possibly fair with hand plane or long board. Fill any holes with bog, and imdediately lay tape over the little bits and peices of bog (1-3 cabosil to q-cell epoxy putty). Wet out some more tape. The pro finish is to keep laying down tape in declining layers like 6", 4", etc... The narrow stuff goes on last. When that kicks off you take a scraper and scrape down the selvage edge (raised edges of tape). Qucik grind or if you don't want fiber glass dust in the air some drywall liek fairing with several trouled on layers of 410. Topcoat with epoxy and paint.
      > >
      > > This is sorta tack and tape, however Payson's boats were scantled for use of polyester resin. With epoxy one can leave out the extra bulkheads/ring frames, and finish the interior, as if the boat was made of strip planing etc... That said, some of the smaller boats using longi seats like Nymph, and EP ned the mid bulkhead regardless.
      > >
      > > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Murray" <ugoigotoo@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Hi,
      > > >
      > > > I am wondering if anybody on here has built the Gloucester Light Dory using stitch and glue rather than chine logs?
      > > >
      > > > I am looking at the Gloucester LIght Dory and Sam Devlin's Oarling dory as possibilities for my next boat. Does anybody have experience with both designs and any advice to share?
      > > >
      > > > Cheers,
      > > >
      > > > Murray Stevens
      > > > Saskatoon SK Canada
      > > >
      > >
      >
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