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61890Re: Design for canoe race?

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  • rowerwet
    Nov 4, 2009
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      get a canoe hull and mount outrigger oarlocks on it, paddle when it is to tight to row and row the rest of the time, a canoe hull is very slippery and is an excellent shape for rowing fast. http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-row-a-canoe-FAST/
      here is my boat, I love to row but don't have a row boat at this time, I converted my 17'colman canoe for rowing, with a little work you could make another rowing station for the second rower.
      josh.

      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "footstepfollower64" <footstepfollower@...> wrote:
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      > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "adventures_in_astrophotography" <jon@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hi Chris,
      > >
      > > > Isn't it important to know the nature of the course? If, for instance,
      > > > a portage is expected, weight and bulk will be issues.
      > >
      > > Agreed, but the original question asked was
      > > "Is there an appropriate Bolger design suited to a two man rowing race?"
      > >
      > > A portage wasn't mentioned, but I agree that it would sure change the game. Almost any rowboat I can think of would be a big handicap to portage compared to a kayak or canoe. If, for instance, the boat was a racer with outriggers and long oars, the hull would be lean enough to carry like a canoe, but the other gear would really slow you down. A lot depends on how serious one is about competing versus having fun racing in a less competitive, but more generally useful boat.
      > >
      > > It might be feasible to portage #526 and similar boats using a dolly with wheelbarrow tires (in tandem?), if the trail were wide enough and consideration were given to handles for the crew to optimize running with the boat - maybe something like racing bobsleds use. Of course, now you have to row the extra weight of the dolly around, stow it in the boat, and so on. If it were me, I'd go for a two-hole sea kayak if a portage was part of the course.
      > >
      > > It's fun to think about designing a race involving simple rowboats and portaging. How about a race for fixed-seat rowboats without outriggers across several lakes in succession, with portages in between? Perhaps the racers' times would be reduced for catching fish along the way, via a non-rowing crewmember whose only job is to fish.
      > >
      > > Jon
      > >
      >
      > There are no portages involved. The course is in semi-protected coastal waters in Bonita Springs Florida. The course is near 7 miles long, and includes enough passage through mangrove tunnels that a rowboat may be difficult to manage. There is a lot of open water to be traversed as well. I just don't know a lot about hull speed and how canoes/kayaks/rowboats stack up with two man crews all else being equal...
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