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mary of scots and lace

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  • mabcymraeg@verizon.net
    hi. I have a friend who said she has a pattern (documented) pricking that mary queen of scots did while incarcerated. any one ever hear of such a thing? what
    Message 1 of 3 , May 14, 2011
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      hi. I have a friend who said she has a pattern (documented) pricking that mary queen of scots did while incarcerated. any one ever hear of such a thing? what kind of lace might it have been? she said it's been in the family forever, and if she remembers, she will send a photo
      copy of it to me to play with. ideas?
    • Ceridwen
      Hi. :) it s possible that Mary and/or Bess did some bobbin lace. Several of thier wall hangings and other composite needlework pieces mention lace - all
      Message 2 of 3 , May 14, 2011
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        Hi. :)

        it's possible that Mary and/or Bess did some bobbin lace. Several of thier wall hangings and other composite needlework pieces mention lace - all metallic I think. It's more likely they purchased the lace ready made. see "Ellizabethan Treasures: The Hardwick Hall Textiles" by Santina Levey for more info on their needleworks.

        For more information on 16th century laces and lacemaking see the following PDF documents online:

        http://www.cs.arizona.edu/patterns/weaving/books/pompe2.pdf

        http://www.cs.arizona.edu/patterns/weaving/articles/nb22_pmp.pdf

        This database contains over 200 articles and books related to lace and lacemaking - mostly historical.

        Bobbin lace sems to have begun in the early 1500's as a response to "sumptuary laws" that forbade the wearing of silk and metallic trimmings on outergarments. It probably evolved from macrame and passementarie braiding techniques, and caught on quickly as it is so fast to work compared to embroidery or other needle techniques.
        The first documented pattern book was published on 1561 in Switzerland, but its author states in her forward that the laces were imported from Italy for 25 years previously.

        Early laces were mostly braid laces, with some cloth stitch trail designs and some small fillings called cushions, chessbords, feathers, roses and leaves.

        The Cleveland Museum of Art has a couple of good pieces of 16th c. lace online, as does the Victoria and Albert, and the Powerhouse Museum.

        I've ben doing reproduction lace of this time period for 2 years, and can share more info if you like.

        Sharon


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: mabcymraeg@...
        To: bobbinlace@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Saturday, May 14, 2011 9:56 PM
        Subject: [bobbinlace] mary of scots and lace



        hi. I have a friend who said she has a pattern (documented) pricking that mary queen of scots did while incarcerated. any one ever hear of such a thing? what kind of lace might it have been? she said it's been in the family forever, and if she remembers, she will send a photo
        copy of it to me to play with. ideas?






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      • Lorelei Terry
        One hears of Mary queen of Scots and bobbin lace, but there are cautions. First of all it could not have been vastly different from what was being done
        Message 3 of 3 , May 14, 2011
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          One hears of Mary queen of Scots and bobbin lace, but there are cautions. First of all it could not have been vastly different from what was being done elsewhere in Europe. LePompe, 1559, is the earliest pattern book and shows braid/plait based straight laces and tape laces, mostly, with a few which are probably torchon. The other possibility is very early Antwerp and Genoese laces. Filet lacis is the one form of lace which is much older than bobbin lace, and is also a possibility, but the pattern would be based on a square grid.

          This pattern would have to be on parchment to have survived this long. Such a thing ought to have spent its years in a museum, to be authentic.

          --- In bobbinlace@yahoogroups.com, "mabcymraeg@..." <mabcymraeg@...> wrote:
          >
          > hi. I have a friend who said she has a pattern (documented) pricking that mary queen of scots did while incarcerated. any one ever hear of such a thing? what kind of lace might it have been? she said it's been in the family forever, and if she remembers, she will send a photo
          > copy of it to me to play with. ideas?
          >
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