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Re: [bobbinlace] Re: Honiton lace?

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  • JOHN STOREY
    I have been using my domed pillow for honiton for twenty years or more. Its used on a stand so the lace is very close to my eyes anyway, the pillow is eighteen
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 31, 2010
      I have been using my domed pillow for honiton for twenty years or more. Its used
      on a stand so the lace is very close to my eyes anyway, the pillow is eighteen
      inches, just don't centre the pricking if you want it closer still.

      I also use it for Bruges, Torchon and yardage. I learned the skill of moving my
      lace very early on.
      Regards
      Janet




      ________________________________
      From: loreleiterry <lhalley@...>
      To: bobbinlace@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, 31 August, 2010 4:27:57
      Subject: [bobbinlace] Re: Honiton lace?



      Donald
      If your question is "what is the point of a Honiton pillow" the answer is that
      the very small lightweight bobbins, and the very fine thread don't need a lot of
      pulling to get smooth stitching and good tension. Honiton workers let the
      bobbins hang partly off the edge of thel pillow (about half on, half off) so
      that the weight of the bobbins provides all the tension. Since the sprigs
      worked on are also





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • loreleiterry
      Janet I don t doubt that a skilled lacemaker can adapt to nearly any situation. But certain shapes of pillows work better with certain kinds of lace, in the
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 1, 2010
        Janet
        I don't doubt that a skilled lacemaker can adapt to nearly any situation. But certain shapes of pillows work better with certain kinds of lace, in the sense that they reduce frustration. Just tonight I found a photo of an Italian lacemaker using a bolster to make a complicated collar shape with lots of bobbins. I would find her working setup extremely frustrating. I would also find a Spanish vertical bolster frustrating. Spanish lacemkers do some very complicated point ground laces with lots of bobbins on that kind of pillow. It depends what you are used to, what you learned on. After my first Honiton workshop I stopped working it on the traditional scale and usually enlarge a Honiton or Duchesse pattern to 200% of the original size. And a cookie pillow is perfect for that. My favorite ones are 19 inches and 21 inches in diameter.
        Lorelei
      • JOHN STOREY
        Hi Lorelie, You are correct, I ve seen some amazing set ups which would set my nerves jangling. But then I am obsessively tidy in my working area. On the
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 1, 2010
          Hi Lorelie, You are correct, I've seen some amazing set ups which would set my
          nerves jangling. But then I am obsessively tidy in my working area.
          On the subject of why, I started lace making so I could get the size of lace and
          detail for the clothing I was making for my doll collection, now I do it for its
          own sake, the more complicated the better. Its a way of keeping my brain active.
          When I first joined this group I was a beginner in some types of lace, but I
          have soon realised that if you can make Torchon its only a hop, skip and jump to
          all the others, being self taught it has taken me longer than average to find
          out the things a good lace teacher can tell you.
          Regards
          Janet





          ________________________________
          From: loreleiterry <lhalley@...>
          To: bobbinlace@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Wednesday, 1 September, 2010 9:20:24
          Subject: [bobbinlace] Re: Honiton lace?


          Janet
          I don't doubt that a skilled lacemaker can adapt to nearly any situation. But
          certain shapes of pillows work better with certain kinds of lace, in the sense
          that they reduce frustration. Just tonight I found a photo of an Italian
          lacemaker using a bolster to make a complicated collar shape with lots of
          bobbins. I would find her working setup extremely frustrating. I would also
          find a Spanish vertical bolster frustrating. Spanish lacemkers do some very
          complicated point ground laces with lots of bobbins on that kind of pillow. It
          depends what you are used to, what you learned on. After my first Honiton
          workshop I stopped working it on the traditional scale and usually enlarge a
          Honiton or Duchesse pattern to 200% of the original size. And a cookie pillow
          is perfect for that. My favorite ones are 19 inches and 21 inches in diameter.
          Lorelei




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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