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Engageantes Sleeve Ruffles 18thC

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  • cskizer <cskizer@yahoo.com>
    Hello, I am new to the list. I am a French Colonial reenactor and moderator of FanIWomen yahoo group. I am interested in Tonder or Bucks Point lace patterns
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 3, 2003
      Hello,

      I am new to the list. I am a French Colonial reenactor and moderator
      of FanIWomen yahoo group. I am interested in Tonder or Bucks Point
      lace patterns that could be used to design 18thC sleeve ruffles or
      engageants.

      What a great resource you have with this list. I am looking forward
      to learning lots!

      Carolyn
    • Lorelei Halley
      Carolyn Please visit my website http://www.loreleihalley.com Go to bobbin lace. From there go to the 2 pages on 18th century lace: 18th c free and 18th c
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 3, 2003
        Carolyn
        Please visit my website http://www.loreleihalley.com Go to bobbin lace.
        From there go to the 2 pages on 18th century lace: 18th c free and 18th c
        straight. That will give you an idea of what the laces would have looked
        like. The 18th century free page has a photo of a sleeve fall dating from
        approximately 1750. It is made in the free lace technique, but any straight
        lace of that time would have arranged motifs and ground pretty much the same
        way. What we know as Tonder or Bucks did not yet exist; everybody was using
        Mechlin ground instead. Point ground only began to occur in the late 18th
        century. Point ground and Mechlin ground continued to compete in the early
        19th century, but point ground eventually won out and Mechlin ground laces
        virtually disappear by 1850.

        That's a long answer and not directly to the point. Basically what I'm
        saying is that a Bucks or Tonder pattern would not be strictly period, but
        nobody else in your group would be likely to know, so maybe it doesn't
        matter. I would choose any Bucks or Tonder pattern you can work
        comfortably, and add some ground in the center to make the central part
        wider. Perhaps that would be close enough?
        Lorelei
      • cskizer <cskizer@yahoo.com>
        Thank you, Lorelei, this info is very helpful. My bobins came from Belgium today and a book with Buckspoint info to my office--I can hardly wait to start. I
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 6, 2003
          Thank you, Lorelei, this info is very helpful. My bobins came from
          Belgium today and a book with Buckspoint info to my office--I can
          hardly wait to start. I shall keep you posted with results.

          Carolyn

          --- In bobbinlace@yahoogroups.com, "Lorelei Halley" <lorelei@m...>
          wrote:
          > Carolyn
          > Please visit my website http://www.loreleihalley.com Go to bobbin
          lace.
          > From there go to the 2 pages on 18th century lace: 18th c free and
          18th c
          > straight. That will give you an idea of what the laces would have
          looked
          > like. The 18th century free page has a photo of a sleeve fall
          dating from
          > approximately 1750. It is made in the free lace technique, but any
          straight
          > lace of that time would have arranged motifs and ground pretty much
          the same
          > way. What we know as Tonder or Bucks did not yet exist; everybody
          was using
          > Mechlin ground instead. Point ground only began to occur in the
          late 18th
          > century. Point ground and Mechlin ground continued to compete in
          the early
          > 19th century, but point ground eventually won out and Mechlin
          ground laces
          > virtually disappear by 1850.
          >
          > That's a long answer and not directly to the point. Basically what
          I'm
          > saying is that a Bucks or Tonder pattern would not be strictly
          period, but
          > nobody else in your group would be likely to know, so maybe it
          doesn't
          > matter. I would choose any Bucks or Tonder pattern you can work
          > comfortably, and add some ground in the center to make the central
          part
          > wider. Perhaps that would be close enough?
          > Lorelei
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