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Looking for plans for Strayer "Longsplice" Nesting Cat Ketch/Schooner

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  • nurse.josh
    Hey all, I ran across plans for this boat designed by Charles Strayer called the Longsplice . It was reviewed in Wooden Boat magazine and the review published
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 31, 2009
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      Hey all,

      I ran across plans for this boat designed by Charles Strayer called the "Longsplice". It was reviewed in Wooden Boat magazine and the review published in "100 Boat Designs Reviewed". I've googled the design, and found a couple references and broken links mentioning it on the web, but otherwise, nothing!

      It's a really interesting design: a dayboat cat ketch/schooner about 16 ft long that splits midships and becomes two identical pram dinghies that are able to nest! This would seem to be awesome for me to take my wife and/or non-sailing friends out until they're comfortable with sailing and then we could race around together (I'm a novice sailor myself). Plus, being nesting, the prams could be cartopped together, rather than need a trailer.

      Does anyone have any more information on this design, or know where I can get a copy of the plans? The book only gives an address and I'm hesitant to write since I can't find any other information on it.

      Thx,
      Josh
    • gregmkay
      I ve never seen that particular design, but I ve seen several designs for nesting boats.The older ones seemed to be a little flimsy, but the now unfortunately
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 1, 2009
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        I've never seen that particular design, but I've seen several designs for nesting boats.The older ones seemed to be a little flimsy, but the now unfortunately defunct SMALL BOAT JOURNAL did a very interesting article on how convert practically any boat into a sturdy sectional craft.

        Extrapolating from the article and the boat you described, it would be a matter of building a double-ended pram. As your construction frame is built, you need to find the center of length, and, if you want one to nest inside the other, move either fore or aft a few inches,making one of the dinghies just a wee bit shorter than the other. At this center, before planking (You can do it on an existing boat, but it's more work.)make two solid bulkheads of 3/4" marine plywood just far enough apart for the kerf of your saw blade. Drill a series of holes spaced about 4" apart around the outer rim of the bulkheads large enough to insert the desired size of bolt through; drill through them both at once so the holes will line up perfectly Install the bulkheads absolutely vertically and build the boat normally, remembering to attach to these bulkheads as well as to the stern, transom, frames, stringers, what have you.

        Once the boat is built, carefully mark the space between the the bulkheads on the planking, and saw the boat in half at this line.Then plane and finish them smooth and, as you finish the boat, epoxy and glass them in place on sides; these are not only bulkheads for your main boat, but sterns for both your dinghies. Epoxy broad, flat metal washers on the inboard sides around the holes. Then insert bolts of the proper length, with rubber gaskets (waterproofing) on the inboard sides,put on your nuts (either wing or normal) and lock washers and tighten them down. These also act as plugs when the boats are apart.

        Bear in mind that I don't have the book handy, so this is entirely from memory, which could be flawed.

        --- In boatdesign@yahoogroups.com, "nurse.josh" <nursejosh@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hey all,
        >
        > I ran across plans for this boat designed by Charles Strayer called the "Longsplice". It was reviewed in Wooden Boat magazine and the review published in "100 Boat Designs Reviewed". I've googled the design, and found a couple references and broken links mentioning it on the web, but otherwise, nothing!
        >
        > It's a really interesting design: a dayboat cat ketch/schooner about 16 ft long that splits midships and becomes two identical pram dinghies that are able to nest! This would seem to be awesome for me to take my wife and/or non-sailing friends out until they're comfortable with sailing and then we could race around together (I'm a novice sailor myself). Plus, being nesting, the prams could be cartopped together, rather than need a trailer.
        >
        > Does anyone have any more information on this design, or know where I can get a copy of the plans? The book only gives an address and I'm hesitant to write since I can't find any other information on it.
        >
        > Thx,
        > Josh
        >
      • nurse.josh
        Thanx, gregmkay. the thing that interested me about this design is that the two nesting parts were identical, making for instant one-design racing with a
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 1, 2009
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          Thanx, gregmkay.

          the thing that interested me about this design is that the two nesting parts were identical, making for instant one-design racing with a buddy.

          I'm familiar with creating a nesting boat the way you described. If I have to do that to another design I can, but I'm not familiar with any other cat ketch/schooner pram designs that are symmetrical fore and aft like this one.



          --- In boatdesign@yahoogroups.com, "gregmkay" <gregmkay@...> wrote:
          >
          > I've never seen that particular design, but I've seen several designs for nesting boats.The older ones seemed to be a little flimsy, but the now unfortunately defunct SMALL BOAT JOURNAL did a very interesting article on how convert practically any boat into a sturdy sectional craft.
          >
          > Extrapolating from the article and the boat you described, it would be a matter of building a double-ended pram. As your construction frame is built, you need to find the center of length, and, if you want one to nest inside the other, move either fore or aft a few inches,making one of the dinghies just a wee bit shorter than the other. At this center, before planking (You can do it on an existing boat, but it's more work.)make two solid bulkheads of 3/4" marine plywood just far enough apart for the kerf of your saw blade. Drill a series of holes spaced about 4" apart around the outer rim of the bulkheads large enough to insert the desired size of bolt through; drill through them both at once so the holes will line up perfectly Install the bulkheads absolutely vertically and build the boat normally, remembering to attach to these bulkheads as well as to the stern, transom, frames, stringers, what have you.
          >
          > Once the boat is built, carefully mark the space between the the bulkheads on the planking, and saw the boat in half at this line.Then plane and finish them smooth and, as you finish the boat, epoxy and glass them in place on sides; these are not only bulkheads for your main boat, but sterns for both your dinghies. Epoxy broad, flat metal washers on the inboard sides around the holes. Then insert bolts of the proper length, with rubber gaskets (waterproofing) on the inboard sides,put on your nuts (either wing or normal) and lock washers and tighten them down. These also act as plugs when the boats are apart.
          >
          > Bear in mind that I don't have the book handy, so this is entirely from memory, which could be flawed.
          >
          > --- In boatdesign@yahoogroups.com, "nurse.josh" <nursejosh@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Hey all,
          > >
          > > I ran across plans for this boat designed by Charles Strayer called the "Longsplice". It was reviewed in Wooden Boat magazine and the review published in "100 Boat Designs Reviewed". I've googled the design, and found a couple references and broken links mentioning it on the web, but otherwise, nothing!
          > >
          > > It's a really interesting design: a dayboat cat ketch/schooner about 16 ft long that splits midships and becomes two identical pram dinghies that are able to nest! This would seem to be awesome for me to take my wife and/or non-sailing friends out until they're comfortable with sailing and then we could race around together (I'm a novice sailor myself). Plus, being nesting, the prams could be cartopped together, rather than need a trailer.
          > >
          > > Does anyone have any more information on this design, or know where I can get a copy of the plans? The book only gives an address and I'm hesitant to write since I can't find any other information on it.
          > >
          > > Thx,
          > > Josh
          > >
          >
        • captreed@sbcglobal.net
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 1, 2009
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            <<The book only gives an address and I'm hesitant to write since I >>can't find any other information on it.

            Would it be worth postage to find out? I'd write and see.

            Reed
          • nurse.josh
            I probably will send something, I was just wondering if anyone knew anything about the design or the current status of the designer.
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 2, 2009
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              I probably will send something, I was just wondering if anyone knew anything about the design or the current status of the designer.

              --- In boatdesign@yahoogroups.com, "captreed@..." <captreed@...> wrote:
              >
              > <<The book only gives an address and I'm hesitant to write since I >>can't find any other information on it.
              >
              > Would it be worth postage to find out? I'd write and see.
              >
              > Reed
              >
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