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weight of stitch-and-glue vs. chine log construction in small boats

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  • rhaldridge
    I d like to hear some opinions. I ve built small boats by both methods, and I think using solid timber chine logs is actually quicker. It doesn t look as
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 1, 2006
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      I'd like to hear some opinions. I've built small boats by both
      methods, and I think using solid timber chine logs is actually
      quicker. It doesn't look as clean in the finished boat, and chine
      logs are a classic place for rot to get a toehold.

      But I don't mind cutting bevels. Another advantage is that planking
      can be offered up to the topsides and marked in place, so small
      inaccuracies in lofting are less likely to prove troublesome and it
      might be a little easier to get a fair sheer, planking against an
      installed sheer clamp.

      But I wonder about the weight. In the dinghy I built in a semi-stitch
      way, I have the impression that those layers of tape and epoxy weigh
      quite a bit more than the log and enough epoxy to stick the planking
      on. What do others think?

      Ray
    • Howard Stephenson
      You could make a comparison by considering a particular s+g design. Calculating the weight of glass and resin needed to construct it would not be too
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 1, 2006
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        You could make a comparison by considering a particular s+g design.
        Calculating the weight of glass and resin needed to construct it
        would not be too difficult. Then you could work out how much framing
        timber would be needed to build it the old-fashioned way. I suppose
        you should add the weight of glue and fasteners.

        It's probably not quite that easy to get a true comparison, because
        a ply-on-stringer design can have a thinner and lighter skin than
        the equivalent s+g version.

        Perhaps the main perceived advantage of s+g is that you don't have
        to make all those frames to hold the stringers/chine logs in place,
        nor a strongback to hold the frames in place.



        -- In boatdesign@yahoogroups.com, "rhaldridge" <knobmaker@...> wrote:
        >
        > I'd like to hear some opinions. I've built small boats by both
        > methods, and I think using solid timber chine logs is actually
        > quicker. It doesn't look as clean in the finished boat, and chine
        > logs are a classic place for rot to get a toehold.
        >
        > But I don't mind cutting bevels. Another advantage is that
        planking
        > can be offered up to the topsides and marked in place, so small
        > inaccuracies in lofting are less likely to prove troublesome and it
        > might be a little easier to get a fair sheer, planking against an
        > installed sheer clamp.
        >
        > But I wonder about the weight. In the dinghy I built in a semi-
        stitch
        > way, I have the impression that those layers of tape and epoxy
        weigh
        > quite a bit more than the log and enough epoxy to stick the
        planking
        > on. What do others think?
        >
        > Ray
        >
      • rhaldridge
        ... I suppose you could do it experimentally, by just joining a couple of test pieces and weighing before and after. Might yield useful data. ... Good points.
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 2, 2006
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          --- In boatdesign@yahoogroups.com, "Howard Stephenson"
          <howardstephenson@...> wrote:
          >
          > You could make a comparison by considering a particular s+g design.
          > Calculating the weight of glass and resin needed to construct it
          > would not be too difficult. Then you could work out how much framing
          > timber would be needed to build it the old-fashioned way. I suppose
          > you should add the weight of glue and fasteners.

          I suppose you could do it experimentally, by just joining a couple of
          test pieces and weighing before and after. Might yield useful data.


          >
          > It's probably not quite that easy to get a true comparison, because
          > a ply-on-stringer design can have a thinner and lighter skin than
          > the equivalent s+g version.
          >
          > Perhaps the main perceived advantage of s+g is that you don't have
          > to make all those frames to hold the stringers/chine logs in place,
          > nor a strongback to hold the frames in place.
          >

          Good points. In the little cat I'm drawing, there are full or partial
          bulkheads every 2 feet, so maybe it makes more sense to go ahead and
          use chine logs and stringers.

          I also think one of the appeals of stitch and glue is a purely
          psychological one. You start out with a few floppy pieces of ply, and
          like magic the shape of a boat appears from it.

          Ray
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