Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [boatdesign] Re: When is a ... no longer a ....

Expand Messages
  • Roger Dewhurst
    ... From: John Welsford To: Sent: Tuesday, November 01, 2005 4:53 AM Subject: RE: [boatdesign] Re:
    Message 1 of 18 , Nov 2, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "John Welsford" <jwboatdesigns@...>
      To: <boatdesign@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, November 01, 2005 4:53 AM
      Subject: RE: [boatdesign] Re: When is a ... no longer a ....


      > The distinction between a Dory and a Bateau is a very fine one, and there
      > were a lot of Bateau used in the French part of Canada for fresh water
      work,
      > and remember that those rivers and lakes are big water! I have in mind the
      > big log driving Beateax , four or five man boats, narrow bottoms and wide
      > flared sides. A scale down would give a simple and effective shape.
      >
      > JohnW

      Bateau is simply the french word for boat.

      R
    • boblq
      ... So when does a boat become a ship? boblq
      Message 2 of 18 , Nov 2, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        On Wednesday 02 November 2005 12:38 am, Roger Dewhurst wrote:
        >
        > Bateau is simply the french word for boat.
        >
        > R

        So when does a boat become a ship?

        boblq
      • clmanges
        ... When my brother was in the Navy, he said once that a boat is defined as a craft that can be taken aboard a ship. Hope that helps. happy sails, Curtis
        Message 3 of 18 , Nov 2, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          --- In boatdesign@yahoogroups.com, boblq <boblq@c...> wrote:
          >
          > On Wednesday 02 November 2005 12:38 am, Roger Dewhurst wrote:
          > >
          > > Bateau is simply the french word for boat.
          > >
          > > R
          >
          > So when does a boat become a ship?
          >
          > boblq
          >

          When my brother was in the Navy, he said once that a boat is defined
          as a craft that can be taken aboard a ship. Hope that helps.
          happy sails,
          Curtis
        • Lew Clayman
          ... I just came back from France. When they mean hat, they say chapeau. When they mean house, they say maison. Man, those French, I tellya - sometimes it
          Message 4 of 18 , Nov 2, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            --- Roger Dewhurst <dewhurst@...> wrote:

            > Bateau is simply the french word for boat.

            "I just came back from France. When they mean hat,
            they say chapeau. When they mean house, they say
            maison. Man, those French, I tellya - sometimes it
            seems like they have a different word for EVERYTHING!"

            - Steve Martin


            ------------------------------------------
            "If your only tool is a hammer, everything
            starts to look like a nail."
            - Anon
            ------------------------------------------




            __________________________________
            Yahoo! Mail - PC Magazine Editors' Choice 2005
            http://mail.yahoo.com
          • Bill Jaine
            If you can afford it, it is a boat; If you can t afford it, it is a ship. Bill Port Hope. Canada ... -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG
            Message 5 of 18 , Nov 2, 2005
            • 0 Attachment
              If you can afford it, it is a boat;
              If you can't afford it, it is a ship.

              Bill
              Port Hope. Canada
              >
              > So when does a boat become a ship?


              --
              No virus found in this outgoing message.
              Checked by AVG Free Edition.
              Version: 7.1.362 / Virus Database: 267.12.6/151 - Release Date: 28/10/2005
            • boblq
              Damn! I have a ship in my back yard. boblq
              Message 6 of 18 , Nov 2, 2005
              • 0 Attachment
                Damn! I have a ship in my back yard.

                boblq

                On Wednesday 02 November 2005 07:02 am, Bill Jaine wrote:
                > If you can afford it, it is a boat;
                > If you can't afford it, it is a ship.
                >
                > Bill
                > Port Hope. Canada
                >
                > > So when does a boat become a ship?
              • pvanderwaart
                ... Except for submarines, which are always boats.
                Message 7 of 18 , Nov 2, 2005
                • 0 Attachment
                  > When my brother was in the Navy, he said once that a boat is defined
                  > as a craft that can be taken aboard a ship.

                  Except for submarines, which are always boats.
                • Doug Pollard
                  In the Cheasapeake Bay anything in the channel is a ship. Thats why they call them ship channels. Doug
                  Message 8 of 18 , Nov 2, 2005
                  • 0 Attachment
                    In the Cheasapeake Bay anything in the channel is a ship. Thats why they
                    call them ship channels.

                    Doug
                    Jaine wrote:

                    >If you can afford it, it is a boat;
                    >If you can't afford it, it is a ship.
                    >
                    >Bill
                    >Port Hope. Canada
                    >
                    >
                    >>So when does a boat become a ship?
                    >>
                    >>
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • Lew Clayman
                    ... In the US Coast Guard, according to their webpage, anything under 65 is a boat. Anything 65 and over with live-aboard accoms for the crew is a Cutter.
                    Message 9 of 18 , Nov 2, 2005
                    • 0 Attachment
                      --- pvanderwaart <pvanderwaart@...> wrote:

                      > > When my brother was in the Navy, he said once that
                      > a boat is defined
                      > > as a craft that can be taken aboard a ship.
                      >
                      > Except for submarines, which are always boats.

                      In the US Coast Guard, according to their webpage,
                      anything under 65' is a boat. Anything 65' and over
                      with live-aboard accoms for the crew is a "Cutter."

                      What you call a 65+ footer WITHOUT accoms, it doesn't
                      say. Maybe there aren't any.

                      On the US Navy webpages, the shortest thing listed
                      under the heading of "Surface Ships" appears to be,
                      ironically, a 39'11" RHIB - "Rigid-Hulled Inflateable
                      Boat" - intended for "SEAL insertion."

                      If I didn't know that a SEAL was a naval commando, I'd
                      be a little bit worried about that.

                      I'm also recalling the 505' Destroyer USS Cole which
                      was damaged in 2000 by terrorists in Yemen, and was
                      taken aboard a tranport ship and returned to its home
                      shipyard. If it can be "taken aboard" then is a
                      Destroyer a "boat"???

                      -Lew

                      ------------------------------------------
                      "If your only tool is a hammer, everything
                      starts to look like a nail."
                      - Anon
                      ------------------------------------------



                      __________________________________
                      Yahoo! FareChase: Search multiple travel sites in one click.
                      http://farechase.yahoo.com
                    • Bill Jaine
                      Touché :-) Bill Port Hope. Canada ... From: boatdesign@yahoogroups.com [mailto:boatdesign@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of boblq Sent: 2-Nov-05 10:32 AM To:
                      Message 10 of 18 , Nov 2, 2005
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Touché :-)

                        Bill
                        Port Hope. Canada


                        -----Original Message-----
                        From: boatdesign@yahoogroups.com [mailto:boatdesign@yahoogroups.com] On
                        Behalf Of boblq
                        Sent: 2-Nov-05 10:32 AM
                        To: boatdesign@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: Re: [boatdesign] Re: When is a ... no longer a ....

                        Damn! I have a ship in my back yard.

                        boblq

                        On Wednesday 02 November 2005 07:02 am, Bill Jaine wrote:
                        > If you can afford it, it is a boat;
                        > If you can't afford it, it is a ship.
                        >
                        > Bill
                        > Port Hope. Canada
                        >
                        > > So when does a boat become a ship?





                        Yahoo! Groups Links






                        --
                        No virus found in this incoming message.
                        Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                        Version: 7.1.362 / Virus Database: 267.12.6/151 - Release Date: 28/10/2005


                        --
                        No virus found in this outgoing message.
                        Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                        Version: 7.1.362 / Virus Database: 267.12.6/151 - Release Date: 28/10/2005
                      • Bryant Owen
                        Bateaux (plural of bateau), as JohnW used the term were commonly used throughout most of Eastern Canada and the northeast to north midwest of the US primarily
                        Message 11 of 18 , Nov 2, 2005
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Bateaux (plural of bateau), as JohnW used the term were commonly used
                          throughout most of Eastern Canada and the northeast to north midwest
                          of the US primarily by the logging industry. AKA batteau or pointers
                          (though some say there's a difference between pointer and bateau and
                          batteau). IIRC a "batteau", a type of canal boat was used in the
                          Chesapeake area of the US. Claims exist that the "Bateau" origininated
                          i.e. was patented in the US but I won't go there.

                          While all pointers are double ended and most logging bateau/batteau
                          are double ended the term bateau also seems to include a style of flat
                          bottomed "transommed" keelboat used on canals and rivers throughout
                          the Eastern US.

                          According to the American Heritage Dictionary...

                          bateau
                          VARIANT FORMS: also bat·teau
                          NOUN: Inflected forms: pl. ba·teaux (-tz)
                          Nautical 1. Canada & New England A long, light, flatbottom boat with a
                          sharply pointed bow and stern. 2. South Atlantic & Gulf States A
                          small, light, flatbottom rowboat.

                          Bryant

                          --- In boatdesign@yahoogroups.com, "Roger Dewhurst" <dewhurst@w...> wrote:
                          >
                          >
                          > ----- Original Message -----
                          > From: "John Welsford" <jwboatdesigns@x...>
                          > To: <boatdesign@yahoogroups.com>
                          > Sent: Tuesday, November 01, 2005 4:53 AM
                          > Subject: RE: [boatdesign] Re: When is a ... no longer a ....
                          >
                          >
                          > > The distinction between a Dory and a Bateau is a very fine one,
                          and there
                          > > were a lot of Bateau used in the French part of Canada for fresh water
                          > work,
                          > > and remember that those rivers and lakes are big water! I have in
                          mind the
                          > > big log driving Beateax , four or five man boats, narrow bottoms
                          and wide
                          > > flared sides. A scale down would give a simple and effective shape.
                          > >
                          > > JohnW
                          >
                          > Bateau is simply the french word for boat.
                          >
                          > R
                          >
                        • Michael Casling
                          When it is a Tanzer 8.5 like mine. Made in Dorion Quebec by French speaking folks. Kaipuke is the Maori word for ship. Michael ... From: boblq To:
                          Message 12 of 18 , Nov 2, 2005
                          • 0 Attachment
                            When it is a Tanzer 8.5 like mine.
                            Made in Dorion Quebec by French speaking folks.
                            Kaipuke is the Maori word for ship.

                            Michael
                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: boblq
                            To: boatdesign@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Wednesday, November 02, 2005 12:45 AM
                            Subject: Re: [boatdesign] Re: When is a ... no longer a ....


                            On Wednesday 02 November 2005 12:38 am, Roger Dewhurst wrote:
                            >
                            > Bateau is simply the french word for boat.
                            >
                            > R

                            So when does a boat become a ship?

                            boblq



                            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                            YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS

                            a.. Visit your group "boatdesign" on the web.

                            b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                            boatdesign-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                            c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


                            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------



                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Mike Goodwin
                            On Chesapeake Bay, a 3 sail bateau , is a skipjack hull with a bugeye rig , regardless of size . You have bateau s on the gulf coast of the USA in all the
                            Message 13 of 18 , Nov 2, 2005
                            • 0 Attachment
                              On Chesapeake Bay, a 3 sail bateau , is a skipjack hull with a bugeye
                              rig , regardless of size .

                              You have bateau's on the gulf coast of the USA in all the states AL,
                              Miss, La, Fla,and Tex. most in that area , are punts any where else .

                              Bryant Owen wrote:

                              >Bateaux (plural of bateau), as JohnW used the term were commonly used
                              >throughout most of Eastern Canada and the northeast to north midwest
                              >of the US primarily by the logging industry. AKA batteau or pointers
                              >(though some say there's a difference between pointer and bateau and
                              >batteau). IIRC a "batteau", a type of canal boat was used in the
                              >Chesapeake area of the US. Claims exist that the "Bateau" origininated
                              >i.e. was patented in the US but I won't go there.
                              >
                              >While all pointers are double ended and most logging bateau/batteau
                              >are double ended the term bateau also seems to include a style of flat
                              >bottomed "transommed" keelboat used on canals and rivers throughout
                              >the Eastern US.
                              >
                              >According to the American Heritage Dictionary...
                              >
                              >bateau
                              >VARIANT FORMS: also bat·teau
                              >NOUN: Inflected forms: pl. ba·teaux (-tz)
                              >Nautical 1. Canada & New England A long, light, flatbottom boat with a
                              >sharply pointed bow and stern. 2. South Atlantic & Gulf States A
                              >small, light, flatbottom rowboat.
                              >
                              >Bryant
                              >
                              >--- In boatdesign@yahoogroups.com, "Roger Dewhurst" <dewhurst@w...> wrote:
                              >
                              >
                              >>----- Original Message -----
                              >>From: "John Welsford" <jwboatdesigns@x...>
                              >>To: <boatdesign@yahoogroups.com>
                              >>Sent: Tuesday, November 01, 2005 4:53 AM
                              >>Subject: RE: [boatdesign] Re: When is a ... no longer a ....
                              >>
                              >>
                              >>
                              >>
                              >>>The distinction between a Dory and a Bateau is a very fine one,
                              >>>
                              >>>
                              >and there
                              >
                              >
                              >>>were a lot of Bateau used in the French part of Canada for fresh water
                              >>>
                              >>>
                              >>work,
                              >>
                              >>
                              >>>and remember that those rivers and lakes are big water! I have in
                              >>>
                              >>>
                              >mind the
                              >
                              >
                              >>>big log driving Beateax , four or five man boats, narrow bottoms
                              >>>
                              >>>
                              >and wide
                              >
                              >
                              >>>flared sides. A scale down would give a simple and effective shape.
                              >>>
                              >>>JohnW
                              >>>
                              >>>
                              >>Bateau is simply the french word for boat.
                              >>
                              >>R
                              >>
                              >>
                              >>
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >Yahoo! Groups Links
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.