Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Hello everyone

Expand Messages
  • Gavin
    Hi! I think this list can be a great source of encouragement, advice, interesting debate and a whole lot more - if that s what we want it to be. So here s my
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 8, 1999
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi! I think this list can be a great source of encouragement, advice,
      interesting debate and a whole lot more - if that's what we want it to be.

      So here's my first tough question. We all know that it's important to work
      in the correct lead in a small flat-bottomed plywood sailboat. I have
      recently read that the function of drag in a design (deep keel at stern, or
      a skeg) is there to prevent broaching.

      In a small boat is this still true, or is the main purpose to improve
      tracking? When is a skeg required? (Some designs have them, others don't.)

      How do you figure out what size it should be? And then - this is really
      difficult - how do you go about ensuring that the centre of effort on the
      sails balances well with the centre of lateral resistance of the boat in the
      water?

      And here's another difficult question - or at least it looks to be difficult
      to me. What exactly is it that makes for a sea kindly small sailing or
      rowing boat? Often in books I see designers and authors claiming that design
      X will perform well in wind and waves, but rarely are the reasons explained.
      For example, what would make a 10ft flatiron skiff with its transom far out
      of the water and a large skeg good in rough water compared with other boats?

      Well what do you think? And what do you want to know?

      Gavin Atkin


      Boat design pages http://home.clara.net/gmatkin/design.htm
    • Paul VandenBosch
      ... difficult ... or ... that design ... explained. ... far out ... other boats? ... This type of question has rolled over and over in my mind. I remember
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 15, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        >
        > And here's another difficult question - or at least it looks to be
        difficult
        > to me. What exactly is it that makes for a sea kindly small sailing
        or
        > rowing boat? Often in books I see designers and authors claiming
        that design
        > X will perform well in wind and waves, but rarely are the reasons
        explained.
        > For example, what would make a 10ft flatiron skiff with its transom
        far out
        > of the water and a large skeg good in rough water compared with
        other boats?
        >
        > Well what do you think? And what do you want to know?
        >
        > Gavin Atkin

        This type of question has rolled over and over in my mind. I
        remember looking at plans by Bolger and Michalak, and then feeling
        betrayed because I learned from others that they were not suitable
        for open water, and could even be deadly on my home waters, Lake
        Michigan.

        I have to go by tradition, because I don't have the answers as to
        what makes a good open water boat. Dories have been out there and
        are well known as seaworthy boats. Sharpies are pretty close in
        shape and may be open water boats. Rounded hulls similar in shape
        and weight distribution to bigger keel sailboats should be OK.

        That's about all I have to go by. I just eyeball the hull shape and
        get an opinion based on lore and superstition.

        In Heavy Weather Sailing, Coles seems to think that the length of the
        boat has a lot to do with seaworthiness, and that the long keel is
        more secure than any other keel type, and that a high coachhouse
        makes a boat instable upside down, promoting self-righting motion.

        Now you know as much as I do.
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.