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Re: Gadgets

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  • lewisboats
    -Margarine tubs make great epoxy mixing vessels. -I once had to pick up some baby powder (talc) to mix and make glue. Smells great when sanding. -I save any
    Message 1 of 13 , Aug 1, 2002
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      -Margarine tubs make great epoxy mixing vessels.
      -I once had to pick up some baby powder (talc) to mix and make glue.
      Smells great when sanding.
      -I save any cuttings (of 1/4" ply) that are less than 1" wide and
      more than 6" long, for stirring/mixing sticks.
      -A paint edging guide makes a great fairing coat spreader (10" long).
      -Gallon milk jugs are fantastic flotation. They fit together better
      than 2 liter bottles.
      -Get 45 gallon plastic bags and put styrofoam, the cheap sheet stuff,
      into it and seal. Won't absorb water! Sealed out of the sun (like in
      seat tanks), it is as good as the expensive 2 part foaming stuff.
      -Catch and save your sawdust, it is a good filler for non-sanding
      applications.


      Hope this helps
      Steve

      --- In boatdesign@y..., "M. B. Holt" <tlohbm@j...> wrote:
      > Is there any disposable thing that anyone uses for boatbuilding
      that we
      > all have
      > around the house? I recall someone worrying about paper cups to mix
      > epoxy.
      > I got about 500 baby food jars just for asking at church, to hold
      small
      > things
      > like screws.
      >
      > I keep thinking that some of us are likley to run into sources of
      such
      > things. If we can share the sources, cost goes down a little and
      > the fun goes up (the latter being the really important thing here).
      >
      >
      > M
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________
      > GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO!
      > Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less!
      > Join Juno today! For your FREE software, visit:
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    • David Lightfoot
      And don t forget those big flat sides make excellent head and corner boards for small polysails. Just cut the shape, round the corners, punch stitch holes
      Message 2 of 13 , Aug 1, 2002
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        And don't forget those big flat sides make excellent head and corner boards for small polysails. Just cut the shape, round the corners, punch stitch holes with an awl and tape them in. Grommets go through easily and if you hold them up to the light the holes can be marked with a pin on the poly material.

        I also use those clear plastic CD cases for headboards, though they are harder to cut and punch a gromment hole through. They are plenty sturdy, though, and the carpet tape sticks to them well. Also, I drill out the sewing holes with a tiny bit as they are a little difficult to tap a punch through.

        In the free wood department, I keep an out open for broken pallets that have nice pieces of oak in them. The slats are just about right for whittling cleats and various little pieces.

        David Lightfoot

        -------Original Message-------

        From: nutty_boats
        Date: Thursday, August 01, 2002 16:13:56
        To: boatdesign@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [boatdesign] Re: Gadgets

        I use empty polyethilene milk jugs for:

        catching toxic chemicals, as in cutting off the top while
        leaving on the handles to make a basin to catch old oil while
        changing oil on my car, then

        transferring to one that still is complete for disposal in a
        proper station

        cutting up to make scrapers for proper fillet shape, or flat
        to make things smooth, or specialty shapes.

        With three boys who love to drink their milk, there are plenty
        more where those came from. One time use is no problem.

        T. Lee.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Lew Clayman
        Most commercial furniture or other woodworking shops will be glad to give you as much sawdust as you want, for them it s just expensive garbage. Most will
        Message 3 of 13 , Aug 1, 2002
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          Most commercial furniture or other woodworking shops will be glad to give you
          as much sawdust as you want, for them it's just expensive garbage. Most will
          tell you which machines feed which exhaust bin: the larger the shop, the more
          numerous and separate the bins, the smallest shops will exhaust all the dust
          into one common bin.

          Production shops will often even know what kind of wood is in the dust ("We
          dump the bins on Wednesday. Thursday we started a run of maple tables.") and
          can tell you more than you want to know. High-end furniture shops can be
          positively oppressive this way, but they often have the cleanest tools.
          Antique wholesalers, don't even get me started! We have a local industry which
          recuts old rustic tables into coffee tables and they LOOOVE to talk about
          species and ages and provenance. Try to remind them that you only want the
          waste products, thank you, thank you very much, thanks, really, thanks a lot,
          'bye now, thanks, yes that is interesting, well gotta go now, thanks again,
          take care.

          Sander dust is the finest, basically wood flour, least likely to contain glue
          dust, but most likely to contain grit and finishes. Other tools produce other
          types of dust, think about it.

          Pressure-treated lumber dust is toxic and readily airborne. No reason to use
          it, as lots of the other kind is available. If you're mixing it with epoxy
          then it won't contribute to bugproofing the boat anyhow.

          -Lew



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          - Woodstock
          =====

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        • nutty_boats
          I use empty polyethilene milk jugs for: catching toxic chemicals, as in cutting off the top while leaving on the handles to make a basin to catch old oil while
          Message 4 of 13 , Aug 1, 2002
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            I use empty polyethilene milk jugs for:

            catching toxic chemicals, as in cutting off the top while
            leaving on the handles to make a basin to catch old oil while
            changing oil on my car, then

            transferring to one that still is complete for disposal in a
            proper station

            cutting up to make scrapers for proper fillet shape, or flat
            to make things smooth, or specialty shapes.

            With three boys who love to drink their milk, there are plenty
            more where those came from. One time use is no problem.

            T. Lee.
          • riquenz
            I use plastic milk cartons cut lengthwise to mix my epoxy in and I cut my spreaders out of ice cream lids, you can cut the shape you need as you need it! I
            Message 5 of 13 , Aug 1, 2002
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              I use plastic milk cartons cut lengthwise to mix my epoxy in and I
              cut my spreaders out of ice cream lids, you can cut the shape you
              need as you need it! I have two pieces of alloy with different
              radeii (sp?) on each end. They meed to be cleaned after use, but
              that is easy enough with cider vinegar and detergent like the with
              anything else that needs cleaning. If I am lazy, I just scrape them
              off and after there is a build up, a bit of heat will get rid of it.
              Go well
              Rique NZ




              --- In boatdesign@y..., Lew Clayman <lew_clayman@y...> wrote:
              > Most commercial furniture or other woodworking shops will be glad
              to give you
              > as much sawdust as you want, for them it's just expensive garbage.
              Most will
              > tell you which machines feed which exhaust bin: the larger the
              shop, the more
              > numerous and separate the bins, the smallest shops will exhaust all
              the dust
              > into one common bin.
              >
              > Production shops will often even know what kind of wood is in the
              dust ("We
              > dump the bins on Wednesday. Thursday we started a run of maple
              tables.") and
              > can tell you more than you want to know. High-end furniture shops
              can be
              > positively oppressive this way, but they often have the cleanest
              tools.
              > Antique wholesalers, don't even get me started! We have a local
              industry which
              > recuts old rustic tables into coffee tables and they LOOOVE to talk
              about
              > species and ages and provenance. Try to remind them that you only
              want the
              > waste products, thank you, thank you very much, thanks, really,
              thanks a lot,
              > 'bye now, thanks, yes that is interesting, well gotta go now,
              thanks again,
              > take care.
              >
              > Sander dust is the finest, basically wood flour, least likely to
              contain glue
              > dust, but most likely to contain grit and finishes. Other tools
              produce other
              > types of dust, think about it.
              >
              > Pressure-treated lumber dust is toxic and readily airborne. No
              reason to use
              > it, as lots of the other kind is available. If you're mixing it
              with epoxy
              > then it won't contribute to bugproofing the boat anyhow.
              >
              > -Lew
              >
              >
              >
              > =====
              > "/|\\\/ ||\ \\//\\\|||"
              > - Woodstock
              > =====
              >
              > __________________________________________________
              > Do You Yahoo!?
              > Yahoo! Health - Feel better, live better
              > http://health.yahoo.com
            • brucehector
              Whole wheat flour makes a cheap (I hesitate to use the adjective good ) wood coloured epoxy filler.
              Message 6 of 13 , Aug 1, 2002
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                Whole wheat flour makes a cheap (I hesitate to use the
                adjective "good") wood coloured epoxy filler.
              • R Coy
                I pride myself on being frugle and effecient crossing the use barrier at the drop of a hat but you sir, I tip my hat to you. You seem even better at thinking
                Message 7 of 13 , Aug 12, 2002
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                  I pride myself on being frugle and effecient crossing
                  the use barrier at the drop of a hat but you sir, I
                  tip my hat to you.
                  You seem even better at thinking this through and
                  being quite frugle even moreso than me.

                  SALUTE :)

                  R
                  --- Mike <panmanii@...> wrote:
                  > My wife and I eat a lot of yougurt , the cups are
                  > just right for epoxy (
                  > except for Yoplait ,Dannon seems to hold up longer
                  > ), paint or varnish and I
                  > usually get three or more batches per cup .
                  > We also like frozen fruit bars ( popcycle) , the
                  > sticks stir the epoxy .
                  > Dryer lint makes a dandy thickener for your epoxy
                  > also .
                  >
                  > Mike G
                  >
                  > "M. B. Holt" wrote:
                  >
                  > > Is there any disposable thing that anyone uses for
                  > boatbuilding that we
                  > > all have
                  > > around the house? I recall someone worrying about
                  > paper cups to mix
                  > > epoxy.
                  > > I got about 500 baby food jars just for asking at
                  > church, to hold small
                  > > things
                  > > like screws.
                  > >
                  > > I keep thinking that some of us are likley to run
                  > into sources of such
                  > > things. If we can share the sources, cost goes
                  > down a little and
                  > > the fun goes up (the latter being the really
                  > important thing here).
                  > >
                  > > M
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  ________________________________________________________________
                  > > GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO!
                  > > Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for
                  > less!
                  > > Join Juno today! For your FREE software, visit:
                  > > http://dl.www.juno.com/get/web/.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                  > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  >
                  >


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