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Re: Standard Dinghy

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  • sohaven2002
    I will look for the moisture proof luan. I have a couple of sheets of 1/4 BC Southern Pine in my workshop, so I will use those. They definitely are not good
    Message 1 of 16 , Jul 1, 2002
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      I will look for the moisture proof luan. I have a couple of sheets
      of 1/4" BC Southern Pine in my workshop, so I will use those. They
      definitely are not good plywood though, something is funny about the
      glue laminate, it cracks when it bends. But it is good enough for a
      first try at this dinghy.

      The big question with the design is if there is enough freeboard, and
      I have to see it in the water before I know that (still don't trust
      the computer programs 100%). What I would really like is 1/4" MDO
      board, but as far as I know it isn't sold in our area, maybe it isn't
      even made in 1/4". If the design looks good, maybe I will invest in
      marine ply, and the thinnest I can get away with. Lightweight is
      good when you have to pull the thing out of the water and lift it up
      to your deck every time. But having a dinghy that can ride on top of
      the boat is a huge advantage over towing a dinghy.

      Paul V

      --- In boatdesign@y..., Mike <panmanii@p...> wrote:
      > Paul ,
      > I've been working on a similar design for the foredeck of the 26'
      1962
      > Pearson I'm reviving .
      > I would use Certified moisture proof luan 1/4" @ $10 per sheet over
      BC yellow
      > pine 1/4" anyday ,I haven't seen any good pine 1/4" ply in nearly
      10 years and
      > the fir isn't much better , especially if weight is an issue , the
      pine will
      > check badly in a couple of years even if you epoxy soak it , you
      have to cover
      > it with glass and it is already heavier than the luan . Use 6mm
      okumme if
      > price is not an issue @ $30 a sheet and up and I would still give
      it a light
      > layer of glass on the bottom , even just mat would make it stiffer .
      > But build it first in luan , just to make sure you dont want to
      change
      > anything .
      >
      > Mike G
      >
      > Gavin Atkin wrote:
      >
      > > Paul
      > >
      > > I can't imagine how you could do this better...
      > >
      > > Gav
      > >
      > > At 18:10 29/06/02 +0000, you wrote:
      > > >I've been working on a dinghy design that should meet the
      following
      > > >criteria:
      > > >
      > > >1. Stable when next to the sailboat and people are standing
      trying to
      > > >get from one to the other boat.
      > > >2. Small enough to fit on the foredeck of my sailboat.
      > > >3. Optimized for rowing, with possibility of adding a small
      outboard.
      > > >4. Displacement goal for normal use, 350 to 400 lbs, maximum
      about
      > > >500lbs.
      > > >5. General dimensional outline of 72"x48"x16".
      > > >6. Hopefully light enough to haul on deck of sailboat.
      > > >7. Cheap and simple stitch and glue construction, probably 1/4"
      BC
      > > >Southern Pine plywood.
      > > >8. Two chine design for added strength and to reduce need for
      framing.
      > > >9. It is hoped that the two chine design will improve handling
      > > >characteristics under oar.
      > > >
      > > >This boat is not far from the Bolger Tortise, except that it has
      more
      > > >of a pram bow and has a narrow second chine that rounds out the
      > > >bottom a bit.
      > > >
      > > >Hull files, autocad files and a cut out plan available at:
      > > >
      > > >ftp://cruisenews.net/pub/dinghy/idealtender
      > > >
      > > >This is still a concept design and has not been built.
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
      http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
      http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
    • William J. C. Jaine
      Anybody have any idea about the cost/availability if 4 x 10 plywood? Bill Jaine Anacapa I. T. Services 107 Dorset St. W., Port Hope. Ontario, Canada. L1A 1G4
      Message 2 of 16 , Jul 1, 2002
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        Anybody have any idea about the cost/availability if 4' x 10' plywood?

        Bill Jaine
        Anacapa I. T. Services
        107 Dorset St. W., Port Hope.
        Ontario, Canada. L1A 1G4
        Tel: 905-885-7742, Fax: 905-885-0040,
        MYOB, Simply Accounting, ACCPAC, Quickbooks, Business Vision, Office
        etc.
        Networks, Security
      • Gavin Atkin
        Hey - I ve just received a nice email from Claus in Denmark saying this about the Dogsbody: The boat is now finished (the picture is 14 days old) a lot is
        Message 3 of 16 , Jul 1, 2002
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          Hey -

          I've just received a nice email from Claus in Denmark saying this about the
          Dogsbody:

          'The boat is now finished (the picture is 14 days old) a lot is done since
          then, the boat is now tested, its very, very, fast and very stable as well
          both on top speed, but also when its laying still, we had forgotten the
          camera under the test ride, but I will provide you with pictures very soon,
          you have something to look foreward to, a very nice little design.'

          I'm naturally very pleased indeed. Now he wants a 16ft version, and I guess
          I'll just have to find time to do it.

          Gav
        • Mike
          Check with Harbor Sales in Baltimore Md , I have got it from them in the past , $$$$$ .
          Message 4 of 16 , Jul 1, 2002
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            Check with Harbor Sales in Baltimore Md , I have got it from them in the past
            , $$$$$ .

            "William J. C. Jaine" wrote:

            > Anybody have any idea about the cost/availability if 4' x 10' plywood?
            >
            > Bill Jaine
            > Anacapa I. T. Services
            > 107 Dorset St. W., Port Hope.
            > Ontario, Canada. L1A 1G4
            > Tel: 905-885-7742, Fax: 905-885-0040,
            > MYOB, Simply Accounting, ACCPAC, Quickbooks, Business Vision, Office
            > etc.
            > Networks, Security
            >
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          • Mike
            MDO only comes in 1/2 or bigger . The luan in Home Depot generally is moisture proof , but you need to check the label . 16 of freeboard should be plenty .
            Message 5 of 16 , Jul 1, 2002
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              MDO only comes in 1/2" or bigger .
              The luan in Home Depot generally is moisture proof , but you need to check
              the label .
              16" of freeboard should be plenty .

              Mike

              sohaven2002 wrote:

              > I will look for the moisture proof luan. I have a couple of sheets
              > of 1/4" BC Southern Pine in my workshop, so I will use those. They
              > definitely are not good plywood though, something is funny about the
              > glue laminate, it cracks when it bends. But it is good enough for a
              > first try at this dinghy.
              >
              > The big question with the design is if there is enough freeboard, and
              > I have to see it in the water before I know that (still don't trust
              > the computer programs 100%). What I would really like is 1/4" MDO
              > board, but as far as I know it isn't sold in our area, maybe it isn't
              > even made in 1/4". If the design looks good, maybe I will invest in
              > marine ply, and the thinnest I can get away with. Lightweight is
              > good when you have to pull the thing out of the water and lift it up
              > to your deck every time. But having a dinghy that can ride on top of
              > the boat is a huge advantage over towing a dinghy.
              >
              > Paul V
              >
              > --- In boatdesign@y..., Mike <panmanii@p...> wrote:
              > > Paul ,
              > > I've been working on a similar design for the foredeck of the 26'
              > 1962
              > > Pearson I'm reviving .
              > > I would use Certified moisture proof luan 1/4" @ $10 per sheet over
              > BC yellow
              > > pine 1/4" anyday ,I haven't seen any good pine 1/4" ply in nearly
              > 10 years and
              > > the fir isn't much better , especially if weight is an issue , the
              > pine will
              > > check badly in a couple of years even if you epoxy soak it , you
              > have to cover
              > > it with glass and it is already heavier than the luan . Use 6mm
              > okumme if
              > > price is not an issue @ $30 a sheet and up and I would still give
              > it a light
              > > layer of glass on the bottom , even just mat would make it stiffer .
              > > But build it first in luan , just to make sure you dont want to
              > change
              > > anything .
              > >
              > > Mike G
              > >
              > > Gavin Atkin wrote:
              > >
              > > > Paul
              > > >
              > > > I can't imagine how you could do this better...
              > > >
              > > > Gav
              > > >
              > > > At 18:10 29/06/02 +0000, you wrote:
              > > > >I've been working on a dinghy design that should meet the
              > following
              > > > >criteria:
              > > > >
              > > > >1. Stable when next to the sailboat and people are standing
              > trying to
              > > > >get from one to the other boat.
              > > > >2. Small enough to fit on the foredeck of my sailboat.
              > > > >3. Optimized for rowing, with possibility of adding a small
              > outboard.
              > > > >4. Displacement goal for normal use, 350 to 400 lbs, maximum
              > about
              > > > >500lbs.
              > > > >5. General dimensional outline of 72"x48"x16".
              > > > >6. Hopefully light enough to haul on deck of sailboat.
              > > > >7. Cheap and simple stitch and glue construction, probably 1/4"
              > BC
              > > > >Southern Pine plywood.
              > > > >8. Two chine design for added strength and to reduce need for
              > framing.
              > > > >9. It is hoped that the two chine design will improve handling
              > > > >characteristics under oar.
              > > > >
              > > > >This boat is not far from the Bolger Tortise, except that it has
              > more
              > > > >of a pram bow and has a narrow second chine that rounds out the
              > > > >bottom a bit.
              > > > >
              > > > >Hull files, autocad files and a cut out plan available at:
              > > > >
              > > > >ftp://cruisenews.net/pub/dinghy/idealtender
              > > > >
              > > > >This is still a concept design and has not been built.
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
              > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
              > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            • Mike
              Capn Bill, Boulter Plywood in Mass. has ply up to 20 long . www.boulterplywood.com Mike G.
              Message 6 of 16 , Jul 1, 2002
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                Capn Bill,
                Boulter Plywood in Mass. has ply up to 20' long .

                www.boulterplywood.com

                Mike G.


                "William J. C. Jaine" wrote:

                > Anybody have any idea about the cost/availability if 4' x 10' plywood?
                >
                > Bill Jaine
                > Anacapa I. T. Services
                > 107 Dorset St. W., Port Hope.
                > Ontario, Canada. L1A 1G4
                > Tel: 905-885-7742, Fax: 905-885-0040,
                > MYOB, Simply Accounting, ACCPAC, Quickbooks, Business Vision, Office
                > etc.
                > Networks, Security
                >
                >
                >
                > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              • Gavin Atkin
                PS - For those of you who don t already know, I should have explained that the files for the Dogsbody can be downloaded via www.duckworksmagazine.com or via
                Message 7 of 16 , Jul 1, 2002
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                  PS - For those of you who don't already know, I should have explained that
                  the files for the Dogsbody can be downloaded via www.duckworksmagazine.com
                  or via http://home.clara.net/gmatkin/design.htm .

                  Gav
                • david@simplicityboats.com
                  Mike wrote: MDO only comes in 1/2 or bigger I have a buddy who runs a sign shop and can order MDO in 3/8 but says that s as thin as it comes - (the 1/2
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jul 1, 2002
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                    Mike wrote:
                    "> MDO only comes in 1/2" or bigger "

                    I have a buddy who runs a sign shop and can order MDO in 3/8" but says
                    that's as thin as it comes - (the 1/2" being the most common for outdoor
                    sign work.)
                    David
                    www.simplicityboats.com
                    ~~~/^\
                    / \
                    / /
                    /_____/
                    _______ /___/
                    \__________/
                    \/
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "Mike" <panmanii@...>
                    To: <boatdesign@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Monday, July 01, 2002 3:30 PM
                    Subject: Re: [boatdesign] Re: Standard Dinghy


                    > MDO only comes in 1/2" or bigger .
                    > The luan in Home Depot generally is moisture proof , but you need to check
                    > the label .
                    > 16" of freeboard should be plenty .
                    >
                    > Mike
                    >
                    > sohaven2002 wrote:
                    >
                    > > I will look for the moisture proof luan. I have a couple of sheets
                    > > of 1/4" BC Southern Pine in my workshop, so I will use those. They
                    > > definitely are not good plywood though, something is funny about the
                    > > glue laminate, it cracks when it bends. But it is good enough for a
                    > > first try at this dinghy.
                    > >
                    > > The big question with the design is if there is enough freeboard, and
                    > > I have to see it in the water before I know that (still don't trust
                    > > the computer programs 100%). What I would really like is 1/4" MDO
                    > > board, but as far as I know it isn't sold in our area, maybe it isn't
                    > > even made in 1/4". If the design looks good, maybe I will invest in
                    > > marine ply, and the thinnest I can get away with. Lightweight is
                    > > good when you have to pull the thing out of the water and lift it up
                    > > to your deck every time. But having a dinghy that can ride on top of
                    > > the boat is a huge advantage over towing a dinghy.
                    > >
                    > > Paul V
                    > >
                    > > --- In boatdesign@y..., Mike <panmanii@p...> wrote:
                    > > > Paul ,
                    > > > I've been working on a similar design for the foredeck of the 26'
                    > > 1962
                    > > > Pearson I'm reviving .
                    > > > I would use Certified moisture proof luan 1/4" @ $10 per sheet over
                    > > BC yellow
                    > > > pine 1/4" anyday ,I haven't seen any good pine 1/4" ply in nearly
                    > > 10 years and
                    > > > the fir isn't much better , especially if weight is an issue , the
                    > > pine will
                    > > > check badly in a couple of years even if you epoxy soak it , you
                    > > have to cover
                    > > > it with glass and it is already heavier than the luan . Use 6mm
                    > > okumme if
                    > > > price is not an issue @ $30 a sheet and up and I would still give
                    > > it a light
                    > > > layer of glass on the bottom , even just mat would make it stiffer .
                    > > > But build it first in luan , just to make sure you dont want to
                    > > change
                    > > > anything .
                    > > >
                    > > > Mike G
                    > > >
                    > > > Gavin Atkin wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > > Paul
                    > > > >
                    > > > > I can't imagine how you could do this better...
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Gav
                    > > > >
                    > > > > At 18:10 29/06/02 +0000, you wrote:
                    > > > > >I've been working on a dinghy design that should meet the
                    > > following
                    > > > > >criteria:
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > >1. Stable when next to the sailboat and people are standing
                    > > trying to
                    > > > > >get from one to the other boat.
                    > > > > >2. Small enough to fit on the foredeck of my sailboat.
                    > > > > >3. Optimized for rowing, with possibility of adding a small
                    > > outboard.
                    > > > > >4. Displacement goal for normal use, 350 to 400 lbs, maximum
                    > > about
                    > > > > >500lbs.
                    > > > > >5. General dimensional outline of 72"x48"x16".
                    > > > > >6. Hopefully light enough to haul on deck of sailboat.
                    > > > > >7. Cheap and simple stitch and glue construction, probably 1/4"
                    > > BC
                    > > > > >Southern Pine plywood.
                    > > > > >8. Two chine design for added strength and to reduce need for
                    > > framing.
                    > > > > >9. It is hoped that the two chine design will improve handling
                    > > > > >characteristics under oar.
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > >This boat is not far from the Bolger Tortise, except that it has
                    > > more
                    > > > > >of a pram bow and has a narrow second chine that rounds out the
                    > > > > >bottom a bit.
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > >Hull files, autocad files and a cut out plan available at:
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > >ftp://cruisenews.net/pub/dinghy/idealtender
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > >This is still a concept design and has not been built.
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                    > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                    > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                    http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    >
                    >
                  • david@simplicityboats.com
                    Congrats Gav! Can t wait to see those Dogsboat pics! David www.simplicityboats.com ~~~/^ / / / /_____/ _______ /___/ __________/ / ... From:
                    Message 9 of 16 , Jul 1, 2002
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                      Congrats Gav! Can't wait to see those Dogsboat pics!
                      David
                      www.simplicityboats.com
                      ~~~/^\
                      / \
                      / /
                      /_____/
                      _______ /___/
                      \__________/
                      \/
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: "Gavin Atkin" <gmatkin@...>
                      To: <boatdesign@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Monday, July 01, 2002 2:47 PM
                      Subject: [boatdesign] Dogsbody successful


                      >
                      > Hey -
                      >
                      > I've just received a nice email from Claus in Denmark saying this about
                      the
                      > Dogsbody:
                      >
                      > 'The boat is now finished (the picture is 14 days old) a lot is done since
                      > then, the boat is now tested, its very, very, fast and very stable as well
                      > both on top speed, but also when its laying still, we had forgotten the
                      > camera under the test ride, but I will provide you with pictures very
                      soon,
                      > you have something to look foreward to, a very nice little design.'
                      >
                      > I'm naturally very pleased indeed. Now he wants a 16ft version, and I
                      guess
                      > I'll just have to find time to do it.
                      >
                      > Gav
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                      >
                      >
                    • sohaven2002
                      3/8ths MDO, thats perfect for 12-20 foot multichine stitch and glue sailboats. Do you know how many veneers it has? I really like working with MDO! Paul V ...
                      Message 10 of 16 , Jul 1, 2002
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                        3/8ths MDO, thats perfect for 12-20 foot multichine stitch and glue
                        sailboats.

                        Do you know how many veneers it has?

                        I really like working with MDO!

                        Paul V


                        --- In boatdesign@y..., "david@s..." <juliejj@n...> wrote:
                        > Mike wrote:
                        > "> MDO only comes in 1/2" or bigger "
                        >
                        > I have a buddy who runs a sign shop and can order MDO in 3/8" but
                        says
                        > that's as thin as it comes - (the 1/2" being the most common for
                        outdoor
                        > sign work.)
                        > David
                        > www.simplicityboats.com
                      • Mike
                        I d bet on five .
                        Message 11 of 16 , Jul 1, 2002
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                          I'd bet on five .


                          sohaven2002 wrote:

                          > 3/8ths MDO, thats perfect for 12-20 foot multichine stitch and glue
                          > sailboats.
                          >
                          > Do you know how many veneers it has?
                          >
                          > I really like working with MDO!
                          >
                          > Paul V
                          >
                          > --- In boatdesign@y..., "david@s..." <juliejj@n...> wrote:
                          > > Mike wrote:
                          > > "> MDO only comes in 1/2" or bigger "
                          > >
                          > > I have a buddy who runs a sign shop and can order MDO in 3/8" but
                          > says
                          > > that's as thin as it comes - (the 1/2" being the most common for
                          > outdoor
                          > > sign work.)
                          > > David
                          > > www.simplicityboats.com
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                        • jhkohnen@boat-links.com
                          The latest World Wide Words newsletter (http://www.worldwidewords.org/, but it s not yet in the archives) answers a question from a reader about the origin of
                          Message 12 of 16 , Jul 1, 2002
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                            The latest World Wide Words newsletter (http://www.worldwidewords.org/, but
                            it's not yet in the archives) answers a question from a reader about the
                            origin of "dogsbody". Though the connection is uncertain, the term for a
                            menial man-of-all-tasks probably arose from a Jack Aubrey era lower deck
                            nickname for pease pudding:

                            "The word is a product of that great melting-pot and fount of
                            culture, the British Royal Navy. British sailors at the time of
                            Nelson were just about the worst-fed people around, living as they
                            did on a monotonous diet that included such culinary awfulnesses as
                            boiled salt beef and ship's biscuits (which after weeks at sea had
                            to be rapped on the table to persuade the weevils to leave before
                            you could eat them). One of their staple foodstuffs was dried peas
                            boiled in a bag. The official name for this concoction was pease
                            pudding, but jolly Jack Tars knew it for what it was, and called it
                            "dog's body". Perhaps it came from the shape of the bag after it
                            had been boiled."

                            I disagree with Michael Quinion's characterization of RN sailors as being
                            "just about the worst-fed people around", their diet doesn't look so good to
                            us nowadays, but it wasn't bad for the times, and there was usually plenty
                            of it.

                            Hope the prototype Dogsbody doesn't look like a bag of cooked peas, Gav! ;o)

                            On Mon, 01 Jul 2002 19:47:23 +0100, Gavin wrote:
                            >
                            > Hey -
                            >
                            > I've just received a nice email from Claus in Denmark saying this about
                            the
                            > Dogsbody:
                            > ...

                            --
                            John <jkohnen@...>
                            http://www.boat-links.com/
                            The problem with people who have no vices is that generally you can be
                            pretty sure they're going to have some pretty annoying virtues.
                            <Elizabeth Taylor>
                          • gmatkin@clara.net
                            ... From: jhkohnen@boat-links.com Date: Mon, 01 Jul 2002 21:31:48 -0700 ... it s not yet in the archives) answers a question from a reader about the origin of
                            Message 13 of 16 , Jul 2, 2002
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                              Original Message:
                              -----------------
                              From: jhkohnen@...
                              Date: Mon, 01 Jul 2002 21:31:48 -0700

                              >The latest World Wide Words newsletter (http://www.worldwidewords.org/, but
                              it's not yet in the archives) answers a question from a reader about the
                              origin of "dogsbody". Though the connection is uncertain, the term for a
                              menial man-of-all-tasks probably arose from a Jack Aubrey era lower deck
                              nickname for pease pudding:

                              >"One of their staple foodstuffs was dried peas
                              boiled in a bag. The official name for this concoction was pease
                              pudding, but jolly Jack Tars knew it for what it was, and called it
                              "dog's body". Perhaps it came from the shape of the bag after it
                              had been boiled."

                              Thanks for this John. I live in awe of the people of past times - so often they seem to have been a race of
                              supermen and women, given their courage, the conditions they endured and what they succeeded in
                              doing.

                              >Hope the prototype Dogsbody doesn't look like a bag of cooked peas, Gav! ;o)

                              Whatever Claus says, I think it's a rather utilitarian little thing. Still, it appears to work well with an outboard
                              and is stable enough for the fishing/ferrying/general dogsbodying duties I developed it for - and in any
                              case beauty is almost entirely in the eyes of the beholder. The only shots I've seen are of it upside-down
                              and during building.

                              Gav

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