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wondering

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  • lewisboats
    In browsing the various groups I lurk on, I see many different things used for masts. From hollow ones, done lovingly, to galvanized fence poles. In my
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 1, 2002
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      In browsing the various groups I lurk on, I see many different things
      used for masts. From hollow ones, done lovingly, to galvanized fence
      poles. In my browsings of lumber supply stores, I have come across
      something that intrigues me. Stair railing. The kind that comes in
      about 2.5" diameter, with a flat on it. I have seen lengths to 16',
      and in some verrry clear wood. One wonders if this might not be
      something to look into? I usually do my own designs, and most are for
      motors. This being said, I have one or two on the back burner for
      sails and would like a little feedback on the above idea. Thanks much
      for the consideration.

      Steve.
    • Mark Albanese
      Steve, I think you will spend a lot to have that shape, which is not particularly ideal for a simple rig, and might be heavier than needed. Maine boatbuilder
      Message 2 of 9 , Jun 1, 2002
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        Steve,

        I think you will spend a lot to have that shape, which is not particularly ideal for a
        simple rig, and might be heavier than needed. Maine boatbuilder Bud McIntosh used to use
        wooden eaves / drain troughs glued together in pairs for hollow spars on substantial
        boats. I gave up trying to find them these days, but if you can, they will even taper.

        For your class of boat the Payson type of glued up 2 x4 s is perfect. Up to about 60 sq.
        ft. seems to work with just a 2" square. And for a square, hollow one, see how easy JM
        makes it sound.

        Best wishes,
        Mark

        lewisboats wrote:
        >
        >I have come across
        > something that intrigues me. Stair railing. The kind that comes in
        > about 2.5" diameter, with a flat on it. I have seen lengths to 16',
        > and in some verrry clear wood. One wonders if this might not be
        > something to look into?
        > Steve.
        >
      • Mike
        Mark s right , I ve made lots of masts of lumberyard wood , easiest is glue 2 , 16 or 20 long 2x4 s together making a 3.5 x 3 mast . Best to use spruce if
        Message 3 of 9 , Jun 1, 2002
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          Mark's right ,

          I've made lots of masts of lumberyard wood , easiest is glue 2 , 16' or 20' long 2x4's
          together making a 3.5 x 3" mast . Best to use spruce if you can find it , fir will work but
          will be heavier . Dont worry about knots if they are tight and smaller than your thumb .
          I have laminated 1x4's togther when long 2x4's were not available . If you have to scarf ,
          stagger the joints a couple of feet from each other .
          Thick wall aluminum 'pipe' , not tubing , works good too .

          Mike G

          Mark Albanese wrote:

          > Steve,
          >
          > I think you will spend a lot to have that shape, which is not particularly ideal for a
          > simple rig, and might be heavier than needed. Maine boatbuilder Bud McIntosh used to use
          > wooden eaves / drain troughs glued together in pairs for hollow spars on substantial
          > boats. I gave up trying to find them these days, but if you can, they will even taper.
          >
          > For your class of boat the Payson type of glued up 2 x4 s is perfect. Up to about 60 sq.
          > ft. seems to work with just a 2" square. And for a square, hollow one, see how easy JM
          > makes it sound.
          >
          > Best wishes,
          > Mark
          >
          > lewisboats wrote:
          > >
          > >I have come across
          > > something that intrigues me. Stair railing. The kind that comes in
          > > about 2.5" diameter, with a flat on it. I have seen lengths to 16',
          > > and in some verrry clear wood. One wonders if this might not be
          > > something to look into?
          > > Steve.
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        • Lew Clayman
          ... Mike is a genuine pro, I m about as woodbutcher as they get, and it worked for me also. If that ain t proof, I don t know what is! I even tapered mine
          Message 4 of 9 , Jun 1, 2002
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            --- Mike <panmanii@...> wrote:
            > I've made lots of masts of lumberyard wood , easiest is glue 2 , 16' or 20'
            > long 2x4's
            > together making a 3.5 x 3" mast . Best to use spruce if you can find it ,
            > fir will work but
            > will be heavier . Dont worry about knots if they are tight and smaller than
            > your thumb .

            Mike is a genuine pro, I'm about as woodbutcher as they get, and it worked for
            me also. If that ain't proof, I don't know what is!

            I even tapered mine (didn't know I didn't have to) with the following high-tech
            gear: a chalk line and a circular saw and then a belt sander. A little
            crooked, but she worked just fine.

            -Lew

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          • David Lightfoot
            I built one for my 10 boat and liked it very much. I didn t think it was heafty enough and bonded on a 1 x 2 strip of oak to the back of it and it worked
            Message 5 of 9 , Jun 1, 2002
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              I built one for my 10' boat and liked it very much. I didn't think it was heafty enough and bonded on a 1 x 2 strip of oak to the back of it and it worked fine. But I do have a couple of warnings for you.

              1. If you have to buy it, for get it. I either got mine from a house wrecker or found it super cheap. You will need to spend money on epoxy and buy another piece for the back and the combined cost will be very prohibitive if you don't find one super cheap to start with. They are easily found at house wrecking houses but if you have no access to this, it's not worth it.

              2. I used a 10' 6" piece for mine. It is quite flexible and will bend nicely, as opposed to the oak strip I bonded to it. The wood I ussed behind the mast broke near the partner and I had to add a bunch of fasteners to it and added a radiator clamp at the break. It works fine and I'm going to use it as a mizzen mast for my latest boat but it does look like hell. The problem, I believe, was in the red oak usedas the backing strip, and the fact that I used two pieces. The bannister did flex quite a bit but it handled it well with no sign of cracking. Red oak does not bond well with epoxyanyway and when the mast flexed it separated on the lower portion near the partner. I squished more glue in there and used a radiator clamp to hold it. Before my next sail I decided to leave the radiator clamp on permanently and also install five lag screws along the length of the mast. It works fine after a year and is now destined to serve as a mizzen mast on a slightly larger boat.

              But the main point is, bannister rails are high dollar items that are possible to scrounge cheap if you are resourceful and lucky. Otherwise, use another method. A couple of 2 x 4's is the simplest and possibly the best I've heard.

              David Lightfoot

              -------Original Message-------

              From: lewisboats
              Date: Saturday, June 01, 2002 05:00:04
              To: boatdesign@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [boatdesign] wondering

              In browsing the various groups I lurk on, I see many different things
              used for masts. From hollow ones, done lovingly, to galvanized fence
              poles. In my browsings of lumber supply stores, I have come across
              something that intrigues me. Stair railing. The kind that comes in
              about 2.5" diameter, with a flat on it. I have seen lengths to 16',
              and in some verrry clear wood. One wonders if this might not be
              something to look into? I usually do my own designs, and most are for
              motors. This being said, I have one or two on the back burner for
              sails and would like a little feedback on the above idea. Thanks much
              for the consideration.

              Steve.

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • mat_man22
              Hi Steve I understand masts have been made out of auto/truck exhaust pipe. Exhaust pipe is bent at your local shop so an unbent section should be easy to get.
              Message 6 of 9 , Jun 1, 2002
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                Hi Steve

                I understand masts have been made out of auto/truck exhaust pipe.
                Exhaust pipe is bent at your local shop so an unbent section should
                be easy to get.

                Mat
              • cruisenewsnet
                I ve had good luck with masts made from trees, just find a straight young tree, cut it down and strip off the bark. It may crack but still stays strong and is
                Message 7 of 9 , Jun 1, 2002
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                  I've had good luck with masts made from trees, just find a straight
                  young tree, cut it down and strip off the bark. It may crack but
                  still stays strong and is flexible. You can wrap some epoxy and
                  tape around the ends to prevent splitting, and just coat it with
                  boiled linseed oil every once and a while.

                  Paul V

                  --- In boatdesign@y..., "lewisboats" <numbaoneman@b...> wrote:
                  > In browsing the various groups I lurk on, I see many different
                  things
                  > used for masts. From hollow ones, done lovingly, to galvanized
                  fence
                  > poles. In my browsings of lumber supply stores, I have come across
                  > something that intrigues me. Stair railing. The kind that comes in
                  > about 2.5" diameter, with a flat on it. I have seen lengths to
                  16',
                  > and in some verrry clear wood. One wonders if this might not be
                  > something to look into? I usually do my own designs, and most are
                  for
                  > motors. This being said, I have one or two on the back burner for
                  > sails and would like a little feedback on the above idea. Thanks
                  much
                  > for the consideration.
                  >
                  > Steve.
                • captreed2000
                  Stair railing. The kind that comes in ... Hi Steve, I tried one on my 12 dinghy, 11 mast...it broke the first time out at the mast partners. I replaced it
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jun 1, 2002
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                    Stair railing. The kind that comes in
                    > about 2.5" diameter, with a flat on it. I have seen lengths to 16',
                    > and in some verrry clear wood. One wonders if this might not be
                    > something to look into? > Steve.

                    Hi Steve,

                    I tried one on my 12' dinghy, 11'mast...it broke the first time out
                    at the mast partners.

                    I replaced it with a straight grained Douglas Fir 2X2 that I
                    reinforced by expoxying 1/4 plywood faces on 4 sides on the lower 4'
                    of it. Very cheap to do. It has some springiness in the top, but has
                    never failed...even in 25 knot winds.

                    Reed
                  • Mike
                    You want that flexing at the top , that is what keeps it from breaking . Mike G
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jun 2, 2002
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                      You want that flexing at the top , that is what keeps it from breaking .

                      Mike G

                      captreed2000 wrote:

                      > Stair railing. The kind that comes in
                      > > about 2.5" diameter, with a flat on it. I have seen lengths to 16',
                      > > and in some verrry clear wood. One wonders if this might not be
                      > > something to look into? > Steve.
                      >
                      > Hi Steve,
                      >
                      > I tried one on my 12' dinghy, 11'mast...it broke the first time out
                      > at the mast partners.
                      >
                      > I replaced it with a straight grained Douglas Fir 2X2 that I
                      > reinforced by expoxying 1/4 plywood faces on 4 sides on the lower 4'
                      > of it. Very cheap to do. It has some springiness in the top, but has
                      > never failed...even in 25 knot winds.
                      >
                      > Reed
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
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