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  • Jayanthi
    HI, I would just like to know what is meant when someone says the bird is in the four o clock position or two o clock position ? How does one locate a bird
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 1, 2008
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      HI,
      I would just like to know what is meant when someone says the bird is
      in the 'four o'clock position' or 'two o' clock position'? How does one
      locate a bird with these directions?
      Also what is the best time for sighting birds - is it only in the
      morning or can one see them in the evening as well? What about the
      seasons? Are more birds seen in winter, summer or the monsoon?
      I saw a strange sight the other day: a large pariah kite was sitting on
      a tree branch. A crow went up close to it and began pecking at its
      wings and body, just like oxpeckers and cattle egrets do to pick out
      parasites and ticks! The kite tolerated it for some time and then it
      spread its wings in a threatening way and drove the crow off.
      Why didn't the kite just kill the crow? Aren't smaller birds its prey?
      Regards,
      Jayanthi
    • Sunjoy Monga
      Hi Jayanthi, Love ur queries. To answer point-wise: 1 - Directions in relation to a clock-movement are just one of the ways in which birders make it easy to
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 1, 2008
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        Hi Jayanthi,

        Love ur queries.
        To answer point-wise:

        1 - Directions in relation to a clock-movement are just one of the ways in
        which birders make it easy to point out a bird's location without one having
        to flash one's hands about. It is genearlly felt that when showing birds to
        someone around, the flashing of hands could frighten a bird (many are pretty
        much suspicious and agile characters) and it may take off and so some of the
        people may not see it.
        So a Clockwork comes in handy. It can be better used with some othe
        rreference points around to indicate a bird's location.

        Straight ahead is 12 o' Clock position.
        When you say Two o' Clock Position' it implies the bird is to your right at
        an angle equivalent to the short arm on a clock at 2 o' clock.
        When you say 10 o' Clcok it is to your left at an angle equivalent to the
        short arm at 10 o' clock.
        A bird to your immediate Left is 9 o' Clock and to the immeidate Right would
        be 3 o' Clock.

        The Clock Reference also comes in handy whilst showing birds on a tree.
        For instance, the tree-top can be indicative of 12 o'clock position, the
        left-of-centre middle would be 9 o' Clcok and the bottom would be 6 o'
        Clock.

        As mentioned above, the Clock Position can be used with some other reference
        pointer.

        2 -- Anytime of the day is fine for birdwatching. It is just that in most
        kind of terrain, the early morning hours are moments of greater activity,
        usually from just about pre-dawn to about 150 - 180 minutes (3 hours) from
        then. This is when many birds are up from a night of rest and so have to
        feed actively to maintain their high metabolism.

        As the day's heat rises, you will still see birds but lesser numbers and
        variety. This is because many species tend to lie low during the hotter
        hours. Having fed vigorously the morning hours, they rest in shade of
        branches and suchlike.

        Then again, c. 2 hours or so before sunset there is another period of high
        activity though the evening sessions too are nowhere in comparision to the
        levels of activity in the early morning hours.

        3 - Re that Kite and crow you saw, well .... one could presume the Kite
        didn't mind tolerating the crow up to a point and then drove it away. This
        is quite a normal and routine behaviour. The Black Kite has become an
        occasional hunter and mostly a scavenger. The crow is in any case a bit too
        big for it to hunt.
        Also, you would remember seeing crows mobbing other larger raptors (various
        eagles many times bigger looking). Well, i don't remember having seen any of
        the much larger raptors hunting down the crow. The raptors tolerate up to a
        point and sooner than later the crows themselves give up if not driven off.
        This is routine crow behaviour, mobbing anything new in their area, or
        mobbing raptors in flight overhead.

        cheers -- sunjoy monga











        On 01/04/2008, Jayanthi <jeyoou@...> wrote:
        >
        > HI,
        > I would just like to know what is meant when someone says the bird is
        > in the 'four o'clock position' or 'two o' clock position'? How does one
        > locate a bird with these directions?
        > Also what is the best time for sighting birds - is it only in the
        > morning or can one see them in the evening as well? What about the
        > seasons? Are more birds seen in winter, summer or the monsoon?
        > I saw a strange sight the other day: a large pariah kite was sitting on
        > a tree branch. A crow went up close to it and began pecking at its
        > wings and body, just like oxpeckers and cattle egrets do to pick out
        > parasites and ticks! The kite tolerated it for some time and then it
        > spread its wings in a threatening way and drove the crow off.
        > Why didn't the kite just kill the crow? Aren't smaller birds its prey?
        > Regards,
        > Jayanthi
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • SHIRISH MHATRE
        Hi, 1. When a position is described as 4 o clock, it is with respect to some reference location e.g. do you see that crow?, the sparrow is at 4 o clock
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 1, 2008
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          Hi,

          1. When a position is described as 4 'o clock, it is with respect to some reference location e.g. ' do you see that crow?, the sparrow is at 4 'o clock from the crow' In this case the crow is asumed to be at the centre of an imaginary clock dial, so the sparrow should be below the crow to our right making an angle that will take you to digit 4 of the same dial. Similarly if we describe it to be at 10' o clock, it should be sitting above the crow and to our left.

          2. Crow is too strong a bird for a kite, size difference not withstanding, to be a prey. Black drongo, which is much smaller than crow can drive away even bigger birds, so size is not the only factor.

          Hope this answers your question.

          Happy birding
          Shirish



          ----- Original Message ----
          From: Jayanthi <jeyoou@...>
          To: birdsofbombay@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tuesday, 1 April, 2008 1:41:22 PM
          Subject: [birdsofbombay] what's this?

          HI,
          I would just like to know what is meant when someone says the bird is
          in the 'four o'clock position' or 'two o' clock position'? How does one
          locate a bird with these directions?
          Also what is the best time for sighting birds - is it only in the
          morning or can one see them in the evening as well? What about the
          seasons? Are more birds seen in winter, summer or the monsoon?
          I saw a strange sight the other day: a large pariah kite was sitting on
          a tree branch. A crow went up close to it and began pecking at its
          wings and body, just like oxpeckers and cattle egrets do to pick out
          parasites and ticks! The kite tolerated it for some time and then it
          spread its wings in a threatening way and drove the crow off.
          Why didn't the kite just kill the crow? Aren't smaller birds its prey?
          Regards,
          Jayanthi





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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Jayanthi
          Hi Sunjoy, Thank you very much for your reply! It was enlightening. Yes, I have seen crows mobbing kites - they are mischievous, gleeful birds. And crows in
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 2, 2008
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            Hi Sunjoy,
            Thank you very much for your reply! It was enlightening.
            Yes, I have seen crows mobbing kites - they are mischievous, gleeful
            birds. And crows in turn are mobbed by golden orioles!!
            Sorry but I'd like to mob you with one more question!
            I saw two kites hooking their claws together and wheeling round and
            round in the air. Is this mating behaviour or are they challenging each
            other?
            Bye,
            Jayanthi
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