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'rare' bird sighted in Mumbai

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  • Kedar Gore
    Talking of surprises & rare species in Mumbai, please check this one out. This news appeared today in the leading Mumbai daily (Marathi). Please check the
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 1, 2005
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      Talking of 'surprises' & 'rare' species in Mumbai, please check this one out. This news appeared today in the leading Mumbai daily (Marathi). Please check the URL given below:

      http://images.photogallery.indiatimes.com/photo.cms?msid=1006759

      The text is in Marathi. It says: "The unseasonal rains in Mumbai confused this little bird. The 'Coppersmith Barbet' , a rare monsoon migrant did come to Mumbai with the (recent)rains but was injured in the process. This resident of Haryana is currently being treated in the veterinary hospital in Mumbai"

      I wonder who has provided them with this information?!

      Happy birding...

      Kedar Gore
      22-D/405, Bimbisar Nagar,
      Western Express Highway,
      Goregaon (E),
      Mumbai - 400 065
      Tel. Nos. 022-26850165 / 9820231239





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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Anand Arya
      Perhaps Indian Express, which published a photograph of Cattle Egrets on a dump and titled it siberian ducks . Cheers. Anand Arya ... From: Kedar Gore
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 1, 2005
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        Perhaps Indian Express, which published a photograph of Cattle Egrets on a
        dump and titled it 'siberian ducks'.
        Cheers.

        Anand Arya
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Kedar Gore" <gore_kedar@...>
        To: <birdsofbombay@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tuesday, February 01, 2005 1:50 PM
        Subject: [birdsofbombay] 'rare' bird sighted in Mumbai


        >
        >
        > Talking of 'surprises' & 'rare' species in Mumbai, please check this one
        out. This news appeared today in the leading Mumbai daily (Marathi). Please
        check the URL given below:
        >
        > http://images.photogallery.indiatimes.com/photo.cms?msid=1006759
        >
        > The text is in Marathi. It says: "The unseasonal rains in Mumbai confused
        this little bird. The 'Coppersmith Barbet' , a rare monsoon migrant did come
        to Mumbai with the (recent)rains but was injured in the process. This
        resident of Haryana is currently being treated in the veterinary hospital in
        Mumbai"
        >
        > I wonder who has provided them with this information?!
        >
        > Happy birding...
        >
        > Kedar Gore
        > 22-D/405, Bimbisar Nagar,
        > Western Express Highway,
        > Goregaon (E),
        > Mumbai - 400 065
        > Tel. Nos. 022-26850165 / 9820231239
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Indiatimes Email now powered by APIC Advantage. Help!
        > HelpClick on the image to chat with me
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > visit http://groups.yahoo.com/group/birdsofbombay to know more about the
        "birdsofbombay" and to see links to other bird sites, calendar,Database etc.
        >
        > To join Bombay Natural History Society visit http://www.bnhs.org
        > and to join World Wildlife Fund-India visit http://www.wwfindia.org
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • vithal nadkarni
        Hi fellow birders!! I did see the offending pic of the rare (sic) barbet but did not mail as diligently as you guys did. To make up, let me post two entries:
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 2, 2005
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          Hi fellow birders!!

          I did see the offending pic of the rare (sic) barbet but did not mail as
          diligently as you guys did.
          To make up, let me post two entries: the call of the coucal which comes
          occasionally into my garden at Mulund Colony.

          This was not the usual boomer, but a harsh chirring, the sort of sound koel
          or crow nestlings sometimes make while begging to be fed; Actually, it
          almost had a golden-backed woodpeckery whirring touch too, I thought
          initially as Irushed out excitedly, only to discover this beautiful crow
          pheasant waddling along with its halux in tow on our neighbour's Mangalore
          tiled roof.

          Then I recalled seeing a pair crow pheasants with younger birds in tow,
          which I saw a few months ago in the hedges at IIT Powai that had kept making
          similarly harsh chirpy calls. These were quite unlike the hooting associated
          with these birds.

          The second entry concerns a stunningly confident Pied or Black-Winged Kite
          that I saw perched last week on electrical wires as I turned into to drive
          towards the Tarapur atomic power station. What a sight, the feathers
          gently fluffing around in the breeze, bright eyes kohl-lined like a
          Sheikh's;
          with its haughty alert grace, the kite did seem to me as a sheikh or prince
          of raptors that afternoon.

          Then I made myself sick thinking about the imagined prospect of losing such
          a bird in the concrete wasteland that Mulund is getting to be. The
          provocation was something I saw while returning from Tarapur: I saw the
          daylight (or was it done at night?) murder of stately, mature kadambas and
          lokhandi (Ixora parviflora) and a harsingar or parijatak tree(s) in the
          Daulat Society near Vashi Post Office in sector 16-A.

          Sure, them folks staying over there want to cover up the whole goddamn
          ground with rocks and tiles but couldn't they have had at least had that
          little heart to leave circles, each a couple of feet across, for these
          wondrous trees, which they themselves had planted and nurtured for all these
          years?

          My friend who stays in the building as a tenant said she thought about
          unprintably violent things that ought to have been done to the perpetrators.

          I think people who live in concrete boxes do get denatured. Even those who
          live in cottages surrounded by trees get murderously after the weeds and
          wild grass on the sides of tar roads; they can't stand the fantastic shishum
          which keeps coming out of the ground, with fresh lemony leaves and shoots,
          year after year after year they chop it down to the ground... They've tried
          to kill the Boharvia diffusa and the durva grass with cementing, but these
          game weeds come through even concrete after a while, and the roadside is as
          crazily wild and arrantly florid as ever.

          Mercifully, the number of wild bauhinias and Calotropis gigas have been
          saved by yours truly and for two seasons the shishum too was saved, by my
          forceful interjection, until my other neighbour, a very good lady, very
          peaceful and all otherwise, came quitely scything after it with a sickle
          swinging in her clenched fist, all because she wanted to park her car
          casually on the road rather than inside her compound!

          Enough.

          I don't want to rant on forever except to say that in reaction I have
          planted half a dozen more trees in my already overcrowded green plot; all
          of them are potential giants and potential trouble makers: one is a durian,
          the other is the monkey jack,then there is a beedi leaf or tendu, then there
          is smaller pink amaltas (C. fistula); salak or snake fruit grown from fruit
          brought from Malaysia; a slow growing litchi also grown from seed; a
          suranga, which is related to the incomparable Punnaga or Tamanu Oil Tree;
          and a fruit tree which the local Warlis (used to) adore as `Alu'.

          Is it any wonder that the Paradise Flycatcher sings everyday in my garden
          then? Lord hath mercies on us.

          Regards,
          Vithal Nadkarni
          PS: To look at the brighter side, some inspired soul has planted half a
          dozen Punnaga (Alexandrine Laurels) on the road side in Mulund East. These
          are all slanting towards one side; However, they are healthy, taller than
          grown men and if allowed will certainly delight our grandchildren with heady
          blossoms. Then there are lovely Mohoganies and Maluseri or Bakul (bullet
          wood) trees on the avenues leading to the Railway station; single Kusum
          survives too; it's companion was killed a few years ago in a Holi murder.
          It's a suburb greener than most in Mumbai.


          >
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        • Venkateswaran.Krishnan@iflexsolutions.com
          Dear Mr. Nadkarni, Wonderful piece of writing!! May the birds sing forever in your garden... However, I expect that there would be some comments to your
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 2, 2005
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            Dear Mr. Nadkarni,

            Wonderful piece of writing!! May the birds sing forever in your
            garden...

            However, I expect that there would be some comments to your planting of
            non-native tree species like the Durian.

            Regards,
            Venkat



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