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SGNP, 01 Jun 03

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  • Kanwar B Singh
    Hi With Mariam and Sreeram (all of us recently relocated to Mumbai) spent a wonderful day at the SGNP today, where we also met up Anish & his friends. It was
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 1, 2003
      Hi
      With Mariam and Sreeram (all of us recently relocated
      to Mumbai) spent a wonderful day at the SGNP today,
      where we also met up Anish & his friends. It was nice
      to get introduced to the wonderful city forest and its
      rich avian life.

      We reached early, just past 0600 hrs, and were
      rewarded for our efforts by the welcoming calls of the
      Grey Jungle Fowl. Numerous calling Grey-breasted
      Prinias in their breeding plumages, a pair of Rufous
      Woodpecker near the BNHS land, Tawny-bellied &
      Yellow-eyed Babblers, Green Beeaters, Ashy & Greater
      Racket-tailed Drongoes, Palm swifts flying loosely
      about and an Oriental Turtle Dove amongst others made
      the walk towards the lake interesting.

      We didn�t get to see the famed Malabar Pied Hornbill
      at it usual haunt, but were lucky there with the Grey
      Hornbill, Palebilled Flowerpecker, Common Wood-shrike,
      both the commoner Bulbuls, Red Spurfowl and the 04
      Sunbirds � Purple, Purple-rumped, Loten�s and Crimson.
      An adult of the last, in all its breeding colours,
      flitting about the Gulmohur flowers was a visual
      treat. A Change-able Hawk Eagle, being mobbed by the
      crow, flew low over us. Seeing the Shama, after many
      years, delighted Miriam and Sreeram more so because
      their pretty daughter is named after the beautiful
      bird!

      Highlight of the day would however be some nice
      sights, in flight, of the Green Imperial Pigeon. A
      lifer for me and if there was any doubt about its
      identity after the first sighting, they cleared soon
      later when it showed up again at the same spot while
      we were retuning back from the lake. I would be
      interested to know the status of this bird in this
      area.

      Being in the area, we also decided to drive to and
      investigate the heronry at INS Hamla on the Aksa
      beach. We counted atleast a dozen nests on 03 trees -
      all of them occupied by Cattle Egrets in their
      brilliant golden yellows. A much smaller numbers than
      the memory we had of this heronry, but, we hope it
      will grow in size in the coming months when other
      Egret and Heron species also join in.

      Best wishes
      KB




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    • Kanwar B Singh
      Hi there Regarding the status of Green Imperial Pigeon that we saw yesterday at the SGNP, I did a bit of looking around when I got back and found that it is
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 2, 2003
        Hi there
        Regarding the status of Green Imperial Pigeon that we
        saw yesterday at the SGNP, I did a bit of looking
        around when I got back and found that it is extremely
        rare this far north. Humayun Abudlali's checklists
        lists it uncommon along the Western Ghats in
        Maharastra

        Anand Prasad's compilation of the status of this bird
        also makes interesting reading-

        "507 Ducula aenea 5 Sinhagad, Bhimashankar,
        Mahabaleshwar, Gole P. 1998. (Text
        Green Imperial Pigeon and list are contradictory. The
        text includes this species but it is not in the list.
        P.G. confirms that this species has been seen by
        others (PG per. com. 2002); Needs further details.
        Although the range in the western Ghats is shown to
        extend north to Bombay in Ali, S. & Ripley, S. D. 1983
        and Grimmett, R., Inskipp, T., Inskipp, C. 1998 the
        only references I could find were the anonymous
        recorders in Gole P. 1998 and the following, AP.
        �According to Mr. Stuart Baker in �Indian Pigeons and
        Doves,� is not found further north in the Bombay
        Presidency than the north of North Kanara. He does,
        however, not make any mention of the skin in the
        British Museum labelled �Bombay� and presented by Col.
        Sykes of which Blanford in the 4th Vol. Of the Fauna
        of British India writes in a footnote as follows:
        �There is in the British Museum a specimen labelled
        Bombay from Sykes�s collection, but the species is not
        recorded in Sykes�s list, and a specimen of the
        Himalayan Dendrotreron hogsoni, also from Sykes�s
        collection, occurs similarly labelled. Butler, in the
        �Bombay Gazetteer�, says that Carpophaga aenea was
        included in Major Lloyd�s Konkan list and that he may
        have seen it.� It is therefore interesting to be able
        to record that a skin of this pigeon (1 of several),
        shot on Tungar Hill near Bassein Road, B. B. & C. I.
        Railway station, 34 miles north of Bombay, on 19th
        January 1919, by Mr. Frei,� Kinnear, N.B. 1919;
        �Common in the heavy forest. Flocks of up to 25 used
        to feed in certain lofty trees,� Koelz, W. 1942; N.
        Kanara, �Well distributed over the central portion of
        the district as far north as Yellapur and as far east
        as Sirsi. It is also found commonly below the ghats,
        among the hills from Kutgul to Sunksal, and I have
        seen numbers in February in the Arbail Ghat. As a
        rule, however, it avoids the ridge of the Ghats. I
        obtained an egg at Siddapur in February 1889 and I
        took two nests on the 12th and 13th March at Tyagli in
        Sirsi. There was of course only one egg in each nest,�
        Davidson, J. 1898a.

        Would appreciate comments from anyone on the group.

        Best
        KB

        Kanwar B Singh
        Mumbai, India
        Tel: 9820194225

        --- Kanwar B Singh <kb_singh@...> wrote:
        > "Hi
        > With Mariam and Sreeram (all of us recently
        > relocated
        > to Mumbai) spent a wonderful day at the SGNP today,
        > where we also met up Anish & his friends. It was
        > nice
        > to get introduced to the wonderful city forest and
        > its
        > rich avian life.
        >
        >......................
        > Highlight of the day would however be some nice
        > sights, in flight, of the Green Imperial Pigeon. A
        > lifer for me and if there was any doubt about its
        > identity after the first sighting, they cleared soon
        > later when it showed up again at the same spot while
        > we were retuning back from the lake. I would be
        > interested to know the status of this bird in this
        > area."
        > >
        >
        >
        >
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      • thewillsadvocate
        there is a good chance you spotted an Emerald Dove and not the Indian Emperial Pigeon .. coz we spotted abt 2 near the woods close to the leopard enclosure...
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 2, 2003
          there is a good chance you spotted an Emerald Dove and not the Indian
          Emperial Pigeon .. coz we spotted abt 2 near the woods close to the
          leopard enclosure...

          By the way, how far deep did u go? I mean, could you be more
          specific with directions and not names of the spots, coz I am not
          familiar with the names of the spots in SGNP.

          anand
        • Kanwar B Singh
          Hey Anand Without sounding cocky, a Green Imperial Pigeon is no Phylloscopus warbler! Besides I am quite familiar with all the pigeons and doves that one can
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 5, 2003
            Hey Anand
            Without sounding cocky, a Green Imperial Pigeon is no
            Phylloscopus warbler! Besides I am quite familiar
            with all the pigeons and doves that one can see in the
            area.

            By sheer size alone it would be EXTREMELY HARD to
            mistake an Emerald dove for a Green Imperial pigeon!
            The big pigeon that flew ahead of us was seen very
            well and as it happens with the unfamiliar birds that
            one comes across, everything about it noted. Well, we
            didn't see the fanned out tail, as it flew, the first
            time, but when the bird putup its appearance the
            second time even that was seen very well.

            There's no doubts about the identity. The location is
            about a KM ahead of the SGNP gate when you enter from
            the film city gate. Its just ahead of the point where
            you take the trail to go towards the lake.

            Hope others on the group would get motivated enough to
            be there soon and see for themselves, if the bird is
            still there, what is quite likely a 'Bird of Bombay'
            after a very long time.

            Best wishes
            KB

            --- thewillsadvocate <jonnybravo990@...>
            wrote:

            ---------------------------------
            there is a good chance you spotted an Emerald Dove and
            not the Indian
            Emperial Pigeon .. coz we spotted abt 2 near the woods
            close to the
            leopard enclosure...

            By the way, how far deep did u go? I mean, could you
            be more
            specific with directions and not names of the spots,
            coz I am not
            familiar with the names of the spots in SGNP.

            anand




            Yahoo! Groups Sponsor

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            know more about the "birdsofbombay" and to see links
            to other bird sites, calendar,Database etc.

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            http://www.bnhs.org
            and to join World Wildlife Fund-India visit
            http://www.wwfindia.org

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          • Debi Goenka
            Hi Kanwar, Anand I was travelling so did not reply earlier. I have seen the Green Imperial Pigeon myself on two occasions over the last two weeks near the
            Message 5 of 6 , Jun 5, 2003
              Hi Kanwar, Anand

              I was travelling so did not reply earlier.

              I have seen the Green Imperial Pigeon myself on two occasions over the last two weeks near the forest nursery at the Vehar Gate/film city barrier inside the National Park.

              Cheers

              Debi
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Kanwar B Singh
              To: birdsofbombay@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Thursday, June 5, 2003 10:43 PM
              Subject: Re: [birdsofbombay] Re: SGNP, 01 Jun 03


              Hey Anand
              Without sounding cocky, a Green Imperial Pigeon is no
              Phylloscopus warbler! Besides I am quite familiar
              with all the pigeons and doves that one can see in the
              area.

              By sheer size alone it would be EXTREMELY HARD to
              mistake an Emerald dove for a Green Imperial pigeon!
              The big pigeon that flew ahead of us was seen very
              well and as it happens with the unfamiliar birds that
              one comes across, everything about it noted. Well, we
              didn't see the fanned out tail, as it flew, the first
              time, but when the bird putup its appearance the
              second time even that was seen very well.

              There's no doubts about the identity. The location is
              about a KM ahead of the SGNP gate when you enter from
              the film city gate. Its just ahead of the point where
              you take the trail to go towards the lake.

              Hope others on the group would get motivated enough to
              be there soon and see for themselves, if the bird is
              still there, what is quite likely a 'Bird of Bombay'
              after a very long time.

              Best wishes
              KB

              --- thewillsadvocate <jonnybravo990@...>
              wrote:

              ---------------------------------
              there is a good chance you spotted an Emerald Dove and
              not the Indian
              Emperial Pigeon .. coz we spotted abt 2 near the woods
              close to the
              leopard enclosure...

              By the way, how far deep did u go? I mean, could you
              be more
              specific with directions and not names of the spots,
              coz I am not
              familiar with the names of the spots in SGNP.

              anand




              Yahoo! Groups Sponsor

              visit http://groups.yahoo.com/group/birdsofbombay to
              know more about the "birdsofbombay" and to see links
              to other bird sites, calendar,Database etc.

              To join Bombay Natural History Society visit
              http://www.bnhs.org
              and to join World Wildlife Fund-India visit
              http://www.wwfindia.org

              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo!
              Terms of Service.


              __________________________________
              Do you Yahoo!?
              Yahoo! Calendar - Free online calendar with sync to Outlook(TM).
              http://calendar.yahoo.com

              Yahoo! Groups Sponsor



              visit http://groups.yahoo.com/group/birdsofbombay to know more about the "birdsofbombay" and to see links to other bird sites, calendar,Database etc.

              To join Bombay Natural History Society visit http://www.bnhs.org
              and to join World Wildlife Fund-India visit http://www.wwfindia.org

              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Anand Prasad
              Dear Bob’ers I am including the updated information on the Green Imperial Pigeon from the compilation of information on western Maharashtra birds. I will
              Message 6 of 6 , Jun 9, 2003
                Dear Bob�ers
                I am including the updated information on the Green
                Imperial Pigeon from the compilation of information on
                western Maharashtra birds. I will post the final list
                on to birdsofbombay files hopefully in the near future
                but I am still awaiting a few final papers. This gives
                me an opportunity to explain that I have included
                information from messages posted on birdsofbombay from
                all species which have been listed as uncommon by
                Sunjoy Monga in his list of Bombay birds in bob files,
                (highly recommended). I have acknowledged the
                author/observer of each message, with the date of the
                message and the date of the observation. Please let me
                know if any you do not want your observation to be
                included in the compilation, although it would of
                course be a great pity to loose any data.
                Regards,
                Prasad



                506/7 Green Imperial Pigeon Ducula aenea Rare
                Bombay Borivli, (1 seen twice on 1/6/03, KS+3+),
                1/6/03, <birdsofbombay@yahoogroups.com>; Phansad W.S.
                Raigad District, (a couple seen and heard at
                Chikalthan, 18-20/5/01, SM+6), 23/5/01,
                <birdsofbombay@yahoogroups.com>; �Bhimashankar (Pune
                District), and by others at Mahabaleshwar (Satara
                District), and Sinhagad valley (Pune District), (RP/SI
                per. com.,� Gole P. 1998. (Not include in the list,
                only Ducula badia. P.G. confirms that this species has
                been seen by others (PG in litt. 2002); Bhimashankar
                Pune District, (probably 1989, RP), RP in litt.
                26/11/02); Vasota Fort, (Satara District), (probably
                1988 RP, in litt. 26/11/02); D. a. sylvatica,
                Maharashtra (excluding Bombay Konkan), occasional,
                resident, Abdulali, H. 1981a; D. a. pusilla, Bombay
                and neighbouring area, uncommon, local migrant,
                Abdulali, H. 1981a; Thane District �According to Mr.
                Stuart Baker in �Indian Pigeons and Doves,� is not
                found further north in the Bombay Presidency than the
                north of North Kanara. He does, however, not make any
                mention of the skin in the British Museum labelled
                �Bombay� and presented by Col. Sykes of which Blanford
                in the 4th Vol. Of the Fauna of British India writes
                in a footnote as follows: �There is in the British
                Museum a specimen labelled Bombay from Sykes�s
                collection, but the species is not recorded in Sykes�s
                list, and a specimen of the Himalayan Dendrotreron
                hogsoni, also from Sykes�s collection, occurs
                similarly labelled. Butler, in the �Bombay Gazetteer�,
                says that Carpophaga aenea was included in Major
                Lloyd�s Konkan list and that he may have seen it.� It
                is therefore interesting to be able to record that a
                skin of this pigeon (1 of several), shot on Tungar
                Hill near Bassein Road, B. B. & C. I. Railway station,
                34 miles north of Bombay, on 19th January 1919, by Mr.
                Frei,� Kinnear, N.B. 1919; �Bombay specimen in
                Society�s Collection shot on Tungar Hill near Bassein
                rd Station on 19/1/19 by Mr. Frei. Recorded as C. ae.
                aenea by Mr. Kinnear (1919) but according to the
                boundary between the races recently fixed by Whistler
                (Whistler and Kinnear 1936) it should be pusilla. H.A.
                has verified another example shot in the same locality
                on 26/5/35,� Ali, S. & Abdulali, H. 1938a; �May occur
                in the Tanna and Kolaba (=Raigad) forests,� Sinclair,
                W.F. 1898; �D. a. pusilla, In the Peninsula chiefly in
                the Eastern and Western Ghats [north to near Bombay
                (Bassein, c. 19�29�N. lat.)-Ali, S. & Abdulali, H.
                1938a, JBNHS 40:377] and associated hill ranges in
                appropriate biotope. D. a. sylvatica, south to lat.
                20�N., the arbitrary boundary proposed by Whistler
                (Whistler and Kinnear 1936) between this and the
                peninsula form (pusilla),� Ali, S. & Ripley, S. D.
                1983; Resident Western Ghats north to about Malshej,
                Grimmett, R., Inskipp, T., Inskipp, C. 1998; Resident
                Western Ghats north to Khandala, Kazmierczak, K., van
                Perlo, B. 2000; Specimen: 3 N. Kanara, in BNHS
                Collection. These birds have been trinomially named in
                accordance with the generally accepted range of
                pusilla and sylvatica but, apart from the usual
                north-south decline in size, there does not appear to
                be sufficient reason for separating them,� Abdulali,
                H. 1971; Anshi and Dandeli Karnataka, RNA undated,
                14/5/02 <birdsofbombay@yahoogroups.com>; Dandeli,
                Anashi and Bhimgad Talewadi, Karnataka, (between
                15-22/4/01, KG), 11/5/01,
                <birdsofbombay@yahoogroups.com>; Londa �Common in the
                heavy forest. Flocks of up to 25 used to feed in
                certain lofty trees,� Koelz, W. 1942; N. Kanara �Well
                distributed over the central portion of the district
                as far north as Yellapur and as far east as Sirsi. It
                is also found commonly below the ghats, among the
                hills from Kutgul to Sunksal, and I have seen numbers
                in February in the Arbail Ghat. As a rule, however, it
                avoids the ridge of the Ghats. I obtained an egg at
                Siddapur in February 1889 and I took two nests on the
                12th and 13th March at Tyagli in Sirsi. There was of
                course only one egg in each nest,� Davidson, J. 1898a;
                W. Ghats Comments on Barnes�s Handbook to the Birds of
                the Bombay Presidency. �May perhaps be found in some
                of the Sahyadri forest, as it is common further south
                in Malabar. Butler, in his supplementary list (section
                2), in the �Bombay Gazetteer.� Says that Major Lloyd
                includes it as a Concan species, and that he believes
                he himself once saw one on the Ghats west of Poona. I
                may add that there is a specimen, labelled Bombay, in
                the British Museum. But it is clear that Butler
                attaches very little importance to the supposed
                occurrence, or he would not put the bird amongst the
                list of doubtful species, and neither Fairbank, Vidal
                nor Davidson mentions the species occurring. It is a
                noisy and conspicuous bird not easily overlooked. The
                British Museum specimen was derived from Colonel
                Sykes� collection, but there is no mention of the
                species in Sykes� Catalogue (P.Z.S., 1832= Sykes 1932)
                and moreover there is a specimen of the Himalayan
                Columba (Dendrotreron or Alsocomus hodgsoni), back
                also from Sykes� collection and also labelled Bombay.
                So the circumstance of a specimen being labelled
                Bombay in that collection proves nothing,� Blanford,
                W.T. 1894; �Noted: At Kamlapur (Andhra Pradesh) near
                Sironcha (Col. Sparrow 6/6/12),� Ali, S. & Whistler,
                H. 1934a; Cotigao W.S. Goa, (5+ between 25-31/12/01,
                HL), Pittie, A. 2002a.

                Abbreviation of observers
                SI-Shrikant Ingalhalikar, KG-Kedar Gore, HL-Heinz
                Lainer, RNA-Rohit Naniwadekar, SM-Sunjoy Monga,
                RP-Rahul Purandare, KS-Kanwar B. Singh,

                References extracted from Pittie, Aasheesh (2000): �A
                Bibliographic Index to the Birds of the Indian
                Subcontinent. Electronic database on CD ROM�.

                Abdulali, H. (1971): A catalogue of the birds in the
                collection of the Bombay Natural History Society-8.
                Pteroclididae and Columbidae. Journal of the Bombay
                Natural History Society 68(1): 127-152.
                Abdulali, H. (1981a): Checklist of the Birds of
                Maharashtra. 2nd Edition. B.N.H.S., Bombay.
                Ali, S. & Abdulali, H. (1938a): The birds of Bombay
                and Salsette. Part 5. Journal of the Bombay Natural
                History Society 40(3): 367-381).
                Ali, S. & Ripley, S. D. (1983): Compact Handbook of
                the Birds of India and Pakistan.
                Ali, S. & Whistler, H. (1934a): The Hyderabad State
                ornithological survey. Part V. Journal of the Bombay
                Natural History Society 37(2): 425-454.
                Blanford, W.T. (1894): A note on birds from Central
                India in Barnes's Handbook. Journal of the Bombay
                Natural History Society 19(2): 185-189. (Comments on
                Barnes�s Handbook to the Birds of the Bombay
                Presidency.
                Davidson, J. (1898a): The birds of North Kanara.
                Journal of the Bombay Natural History Society, 12(1):
                43-72.
                Gole, P. (1998): Birds of the Sahyadri. Journal of the
                Ecological Society. Vol. 11. Surveyed 1994-6.
                Grimmett, R., Inskipp, T., Inskipp, C. (1998): Birds
                of the Indian Subcontinent.
                Kazmierczak, K, van Perlo, B. (2000): A Field Guide to
                the Birds of the Indian Subcontinent.
                Kinnear, N.B. (1919): Extension of range of the Green
                Imperial Pigeon Carpophaga aenea aenea in Western
                India. Journal of the Bombay Natural History Society
                26(3): 846.
                Koelz, W. (1942): Notes on the birds of the Londa
                neighbourhood, Bombay Presidency. Journal of the
                Bombay Natural History Society 43: 11-33.
                Sinclair, W.F. (1898): Review. ["The Fauna of British
                India, including Ceylon and Burma." Published under
                the authority of the Secretary of State for India in
                Council. Edited by W.T. Blanford, F.R.S., "Birds,"
                Vol. IV, 1898.]. Journal of the Bombay Natural History
                Society 12(1): 184-186.
                Pittie, A. (2002): Birding notes. Pitta 129: 6-7.



                =====
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                Permanent contact address Middlewood, Roeburndale West, Lancaster, U.K. LA29LL

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