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Talawa

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  • malanikalpana
    31st August 2008 7.15am to 9.30am Rajesh, Jayanthi and I spent a couple of hours at Talawa. The path was really lush with vegetation and alive to the calls of
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 1, 2008
      31st August 2008
      7.15am to 9.30am
      Rajesh, Jayanthi and I spent a couple of hours at Talawa. The path
      was really lush with vegetation and alive to the calls of the plain
      and ashy prinia. Four white eared bulbuls landed on a bush. In the
      water on the right a great egret, two grey herons, several little
      egrets, cormorants, common redshanks, pond herons, and a couple of
      little terns. On the left a great egret, intermediate egret, cattle
      and little egrets, a white breasted water hen, a sandpiper. As we
      walked ahead some sparrows eagerly catching green caterpillars – one
      female in particular had at least four caterpillars in it's mouth.
      We couldn't find any green ones on the plants but several hairy
      black ones. A couple of red avadavats landed on the path ahead. As
      we walked towards the seashore a flypast of a couple of doves. The
      bushes along the path which look like stunted casuarinas were in
      flower – beautiful tiny light pink flowers which really transform
      the bush and give it an overall pink blush. A brahminy kite being
      harassed by a crow, more red avadavats, a couple of black drongos, a
      couple of common mynas calling to each other and a very vocal
      tailorbird. At the seashore in the mangrove clusters a fantail
      flycatcher, a couple of pied starlings on the shore, a female Indian
      robin, more egrets and a flypast of at three groups of whimbrels (
      about 20 in all) Many large terns One of which we could identify as
      the Caspian tern – I'm still very unsure of my tern IDs.As we neared
      the water we realized that there was a large congregation of plovers
      well camouflaged because of the similarity to the sand colours –
      here again because of the distance we were really not to sure of
      which plovers but most seemed to be lesser sand plovers. As we stood
      there enthralled by at least five to six groups of plovers wheeling
      about – there must have been at least 500+. A lone green bee eater
      which Rajesh felt had more chestnut on the head, less of the black
      eyestripe and less blue on the chin. As we walked back a couple of
      spotbilled ducks in the water and several redshanks, common green
      shanks and a few little stints. Many large terns flying above one
      with a recently caught fish in it's beak being followed by another
      hopeful tern! As we neared the end we heard and saw a yellow eyed
      babbler on the same bush as the white eared bulbuls. A lovely end to
      a great morning of birding.
      Kalpana
    • Alok Bhave
      Hello Kalpana, Nice report. So the waders are back. Last time around 16th August also there were some but only a few of them. In fact in the last month visited
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 1, 2008
        Hello Kalpana,

        Nice report. So the waders are back. Last time around 16th August also there
        were some but only a few of them.

        In fact in the last month visited Talawe twice with Julius mainly for
        butterfly watch.
        At that time learned about the these "stunted casuarinas" like plants.
        Its name is Farash or Tamarix.

        Here is a link to a photo blog with pics of these trees and
        some unid caterpillars and butterflies.

        http://alokbhave.blogspot.com/2008/08/16-aug-2008-talawe-butterfly-watch.html
        http://alokbhave.blogspot.com/2008/08/talawe-9th-august-2008.html

        Thanks and Regards,
        Alok

        On Mon, Sep 1, 2008 at 1:41 PM, malanikalpana <malanikalpana@...>wrote:

        > 31st August 2008
        > 7.15am to 9.30am
        > Rajesh, Jayanthi and I spent a couple of hours at Talawa. The path
        > was really lush with vegetation and alive to the calls of the plain
        > and ashy prinia. Four white eared bulbuls landed on a bush. In the
        > water on the right a great egret, two grey herons, several little
        > egrets, cormorants, common redshanks, pond herons, and a couple of
        > little terns. On the left a great egret, intermediate egret, cattle
        > and little egrets, a white breasted water hen, a sandpiper. As we
        > walked ahead some sparrows eagerly catching green caterpillars � one
        > female in particular had at least four caterpillars in it's mouth.
        > We couldn't find any green ones on the plants but several hairy
        > black ones. A couple of red avadavats landed on the path ahead. As
        > we walked towards the seashore a flypast of a couple of doves. The
        > bushes along the path which look like stunted casuarinas were in
        > flower � beautiful tiny light pink flowers which really transform
        > the bush and give it an overall pink blush. A brahminy kite being
        > harassed by a crow, more red avadavats, a couple of black drongos, a
        > couple of common mynas calling to each other and a very vocal
        > tailorbird. At the seashore in the mangrove clusters a fantail
        > flycatcher, a couple of pied starlings on the shore, a female Indian
        > robin, more egrets and a flypast of at three groups of whimbrels (
        > about 20 in all) Many large terns One of which we could identify as
        > the Caspian tern � I'm still very unsure of my tern IDs.As we neared
        > the water we realized that there was a large congregation of plovers
        > well camouflaged because of the similarity to the sand colours �
        > here again because of the distance we were really not to sure of
        > which plovers but most seemed to be lesser sand plovers. As we stood
        > there enthralled by at least five to six groups of plovers wheeling
        > about � there must have been at least 500+. A lone green bee eater
        > which Rajesh felt had more chestnut on the head, less of the black
        > eyestripe and less blue on the chin. As we walked back a couple of
        > spotbilled ducks in the water and several redshanks, common green
        > shanks and a few little stints. Many large terns flying above one
        > with a recently caught fish in it's beak being followed by another
        > hopeful tern! As we neared the end we heard and saw a yellow eyed
        > babbler on the same bush as the white eared bulbuls. A lovely end to
        > a great morning of birding.
        > Kalpana
        >
        >
        >



        --
        Alok Bhave
        Equipment: Nikon D200, Tamaron 70-300
        Hand held
        Vist my photos at:
        www.alokbhave.blogspot.com


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