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What Comes Next?

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  • Mike Tintner
    This looks interesting, though I haven t read it yet. Has anyone read it - or have any comments? What Science Offers the Humanities: Integrating Body and
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 16, 2009

      This looks interesting, though I haven't read it yet. Has anyone read it - or have any comments?

      "What Science Offers the Humanities: Integrating Body and Culture: Beyond Dualism (New Approaches to European His) (Paperback)

      by Edward Slingerland (Author) "
       
      Review
      "For years humanists have been heralding the end of the great age of Theory. But no one can agree on what comes next. Edward Slingerland knows what comes next: a turn toward science. No one with an interest in where the humanities have recently been, and where they will now be going, can afford to miss out on What Science Offers the Humanities." --Jonathan Gottschall, Washington and Jefferson College "Inquiry into what it means to be human has been hindered by an artificial separation of the humanities and science. Historically, adherence to this separation has been a minority position - one whose intellectual damage Slingerland shrewdly appraises and sets out to repair. This is an intelligent and timely project." - Mark Turner, Case Western Reserve University.

      Review
      "For years humanists have been heralding the end of the great age of Theory. But no one can agree on what comes next. Edward Slingerland knows what comes next: a turn toward science. No one with an interest in where the humanities have recently been, and where they will now be going, can afford to miss out on What Science Offers the Humanities." --Jonathan Gottschall, Washington and Jefferson College

      "Inquiry into what it means to be human has been hindered by an artificial separation of the humanities and science. Historically, adherence to this separation has been a minority position - one whose intellectual damage Slingerland shrewdly appraises and sets out to repair. This is an intelligent and timely project." - Mark Turner, Case Western Reserve University.
       
    • Jeff P. Turpin
      Mike--I haven t read it, but it would sure be nice to have a review, formal or informal, from someone in the adaptationist fold. I ve seen four versions of
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 17, 2009
        Mike--I haven't read it, but it would sure be nice to have a review, formal or informal, from someone in the adaptationist fold.  I've seen four versions of "The Next Big Thing" in the last year, and Amazon owns me.  Anybody? JT

        Jeff P. Turpin, President
        Turpin and Sons Inc.
        Cultural Resource Management
        2047 Lakeshore, Canyon Lake, TX 78133
        (512) 922-7826
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Monday, February 16, 2009 5:58 AM
        Subject: [SPAM][biopoet] What Comes Next?

        This looks interesting, though I haven't read it yet. Has anyone read it - or have any comments?

        "What Science Offers the Humanities: Integrating Body and Culture: Beyond Dualism (New Approaches to European His) (Paperback)

        by Edward Slingerland (Author) "
         
        Review
        "For years humanists have been heralding the end of the great age of Theory. But no one can agree on what comes next. Edward Slingerland knows what comes next: a turn toward science. No one with an interest in where the humanities have recently been, and where they will now be going, can afford to miss out on What Science Offers the Humanities." --Jonathan Gottschall, Washington and Jefferson College "Inquiry into what it means to be human has been hindered by an artificial separation of the humanities and science. Historically, adherence to this separation has been a minority position - one whose intellectual damage Slingerland shrewdly appraises and sets out to repair. This is an intelligent and timely project." - Mark Turner, Case Western Reserve University.

        Review
        "For years humanists have been heralding the end of the great age of Theory. But no one can agree on what comes next. Edward Slingerland knows what comes next: a turn toward science. No one with an interest in where the humanities have recently been, and where they will now be going, can afford to miss out on What Science Offers the Humanities." --Jonathan Gottschall, Washington and Jefferson College

        "Inquiry into what it means to be human has been hindered by an artificial separation of the humanities and science. Historically, adherence to this separation has been a minority position - one whose intellectual damage Slingerland shrewdly appraises and sets out to repair. This is an intelligent and timely project." - Mark Turner, Case Western Reserve University.
         

      • Tom Dolack
        For those pressed for time (as I am at the moment), these two links might at least whet the appetite for what he has to say:
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 17, 2009
          For those pressed for time (as I am at the moment), these two links might at least whet the appetite for what he has to say:

          http://www.washjeff.edu/users/jgottschall/articles_files/boston%20globe.doc
          http://www.washjeff.edu/users/jgottschall/articles_files/hidden%20histories.htm

          td

          Jeff P. Turpin wrote:

          Mike--I haven't read it, but it would sure be nice to have a review, formal or informal, from someone in the adaptationist fold.  I've seen four versions of "The Next Big Thing" in the last year, and Amazon owns me.  Anybody? JT

          Jeff P. Turpin, President
          Turpin and Sons Inc.
          Cultural Resource Management
          2047 Lakeshore, Canyon Lake, TX 78133
          (512) 922-7826
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Monday, February 16, 2009 5:58 AM
          Subject: [SPAM][biopoet] What Comes Next?

          This looks interesting, though I haven't read it yet. Has anyone read it - or have any comments?

          "What Science Offers the Humanities: Integrating Body and Culture: Beyond Dualism (New Approaches to European His) (Paperback)

          by Edward Slingerland (Author) "
           
          Review
          "For years humanists have been heralding the end of the great age of Theory. But no one can agree on what comes next. Edward Slingerland knows what comes next: a turn toward science. No one with an interest in where the humanities have recently been, and where they will now be going, can afford to miss out on What Science Offers the Humanities." --Jonathan Gottschall, Washington and Jefferson College "Inquiry into what it means to be human has been hindered by an artificial separation of the humanities and science. Historically, adherence to this separation has been a minority position - one whose intellectual damage Slingerland shrewdly appraises and sets out to repair. This is an intelligent and timely project." - Mark Turner, Case Western Reserve University.

          Review
          "For years humanists have been heralding the end of the great age of Theory. But no one can agree on what comes next. Edward Slingerland knows what comes next: a turn toward science. No one with an interest in where the humanities have recently been, and where they will now be going, can afford to miss out on What Science Offers the Humanities." --Jonathan Gottschall, Washington and Jefferson College

          "Inquiry into what it means to be human has been hindered by an artificial separation of the humanities and science. Historically, adherence to this separation has been a minority position - one whose intellectual damage Slingerland shrewdly appraises and sets out to repair. This is an intelligent and timely project." - Mark Turner, Case Western Reserve University.
           
        • Mike Tintner
          Jeff T:I ve seen four versions of The Next Big Thing in the last year.. ..which are?
          Message 4 of 11 , Feb 17, 2009
            Jeff T:I've seen four versions of "The Next Big Thing" in the last year..
             
            ..which are? 
          • Jeff P. Turpin
            Jon Gottschall s Literature, Science, and A New Humanities, Flesch s Comeuppance . . .Biological Components of Fiction, Herman s (ed) Narrative Theory and the
            Message 5 of 11 , Feb 17, 2009
              Jon Gottschall's Literature, Science, and A New Humanities, Flesch's Comeuppance . . .Biological Components of Fiction, Herman's (ed) Narrative Theory and the Cognitive Sciences, Zunshine's Why We Read Fiction: Theory of Mind and the Novel.  These are the literary ones.  If I didn't have a job I'd have time to list the non-literary ones. JT

              Jeff P. Turpin, President
              Turpin and Sons Inc.
              Cultural Resource Management
              2047 Lakeshore, Canyon Lake, TX 78133
              (512) 922-7826
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Tuesday, February 17, 2009 1:21 PM
              Subject: [SPAM][biopoet] Re: What Comes Next?

              Jeff T:I've seen four versions of "The Next Big Thing" in the last year..
               
              ..which are? 

            • William Benzon
              Brian Boyd¹s got a big book coming out in May from Harvard: On the Origin of Stories Evolution, Cognition, and Fiction Brian Boyd A century and a half after
              Message 6 of 11 , Feb 17, 2009
                Re: [SPAM][biopoet] What Comes Next? Brian Boyd’s got a big book coming out in May from Harvard:

                 On the Origin of Stories
                Evolution, Cognition, and Fiction
                Brian Boyd

                      A century and a half after the publication of Origin of Species, evolutionary thinking has expanded beyond the field of biology to include virtually all human-related subjects—anthropology, archeology, psychology, economics, religion, morality, politics, culture, and art. Now a distinguished scholar offers the first comprehensive account of the evolutionary origins of art and storytelling. Brian Boyd explains why we tell stories, how our minds are shaped to understand them, and what difference an evolutionary understanding of human nature makes to stories we love.

                http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog/BOYORI.html
                --

                William L. Benzon
                708 Jersey Avenue, Apt. 2A
                Jersey City, NJ 07302
                201 217-1010

                "You won't get a wild heroic ride to heaven on pretty little sounds."--George Ives

                Mind-Culture Coevolution: http://asweknowit.ca/evcult/
                The Valve (cultural blog): http://tinyurl.com/ormqg
                flickr: http://flickr.com/photos/stc4blues/
                YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/STC4blues



                on 2/17/09 12:29 PM, Jeff P. Turpin at jpturpin@... wrote:


                 

                Mike--I haven't read it, but it would sure be nice to have a review, formal or informal, from someone in the adaptationist fold.  I've seen four versions of "The Next Big Thing" in the last year, and Amazon owns me.  Anybody? JT

                Jeff P. Turpin, President
                Turpin and Sons Inc.
                Cultural Resource Management
                2047 Lakeshore, Canyon Lake, TX 78133
                (512) 922-7826

                ----- Original Message -----
                 
                From:  Mike  Tintner <mailto:tintner@...>  
                 
                To: biopoet@yahoogroups.com
                 
                Sent: Monday, February 16, 2009 5:58  AM
                 
                Subject: [SPAM][biopoet] What Comes  Next?
                 

                 
                 


                This looks interesting, though I  haven't read it yet. Has anyone read it - or have any comments?

                "What Science Offers the  Humanities: Integrating Body and Culture: Beyond Dualism (New Approaches to  European His) (Paperback)

                by Edward Slingerland (Author) "
                 
                 
                 
                Review
                "For years humanists have been heralding the  end of the great age of Theory. But no one can agree on what comes next.  Edward Slingerland knows what comes next: a turn toward science. No one with  an interest in where the humanities have recently been, and where they will  now be going, can afford to miss out on What Science Offers the Humanities."  --Jonathan Gottschall, Washington and Jefferson College "Inquiry into what it  means to be human has been hindered by an artificial separation of the  humanities and science. Historically, adherence to this separation has been a  minority position - one whose intellectual damage Slingerland shrewdly  appraises and sets out to repair. This is an intelligent and timely project."  - Mark Turner, Case Western Reserve University.

                Review
                "For  years humanists have been heralding the end of the great age of Theory. But no  one can agree on what comes next. Edward Slingerland knows what comes next: a  turn toward science. No one with an interest in where the humanities have  recently been, and where they will now be going, can afford to miss out on  What Science Offers the Humanities." --Jonathan Gottschall, Washington and  Jefferson College

                "Inquiry into what it means to be human has been  hindered by an artificial separation of the humanities and science.  Historically, adherence to this separation has been a minority position - one  whose intellectual damage Slingerland shrewdly appraises and sets out to  repair. This is an intelligent and timely project." - Mark Turner, Case  Western Reserve University.
                 
                 
                 
                http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/0521701511/ref=pe_5301_14745611_pe_ar_t3


                 
                    



              • Joseph Carroll
                Here is a little more bibliography, from a recent summary: Over the past three or four years, the number of scholars publishing in this area has increased
                Message 7 of 11 , Feb 17, 2009
                  Here is a little more bibliography, from a recent summary:
                   

                  Over the past three or four years, the number of scholars publishing in this area has increased dramatically. Since Carroll published Literary Darwinism in 2004, many new essays and books taking this approach have been published or are in press. The volume edited by Gottschall and Wilson, The Literary Animal (2005), garnered international attention, with commentaries in The New York Times, Science, Nature, and many newspapers and magazines inEngland and Europe . Other recently published books taking this approach include Headlam Wells’ Shakespeare’s Humanism (Cambridge UP 2005), Headlam Wells’ and McFadden’s edited collection Human Nature: Fact and Fiction (Continuum 2006), Lisa Zunshine’s Why We Read Fiction (Ohio State 2006), Peter Swirski’s Of Literature and Knowledge (Routledge 2007), Marcus Nordlund’s Shakespeare and the Nature of Love (Northwestern UP 2007), David Bordwell’s Poetics of Cinema (Routledge 2008), Jon Gottschall’s two books The Rape of Troy (Cambridge UP, 2008) and Literature, Science, and a New Humanities (Palgrave 2008), and Denis Dutton’s The Art Instinct (Bloomsbury 2009). Books in press include Brian Boyd’s On the Origin of Stories (Harvard UP), Harold Fromm’s From Ecology to Consciousness (Johns Hopkins), Torben Grodal’s Embodied Visions (Oxford UP), and books for which I don’t yet have titles by Clint MacHann (Ashgate), Judith Saunders (McFarland), Nancy Easterlin (Johns Hopkins UP), and Blakey Vermeule (Johns Hopkins UP).

                   

                  Brian Boyd, Joseph Carroll, and Jonathan Gottschall have just finished editing an anthology bringing together a large selection of older and more recent work in the field, Evolution, Literature, Film: A Reader.

                   

                  Along with all these books and lectures, there have of course been many articles published in the field, both in journals geared toward social scientists and in journals geared toward humanists. In the fall of 2008, a special double issue of the journal Style (vol. 42, nos. 2 & 3) was devoted exclusively to literary Darwinism. For this special issue, Joseph Carroll wrote a “target” article, “An Evolutionary Paradigm for Literary Study.” Thirty-five scholars wrote responses to the target article, and Carroll wrote a rejoinder to the responses.

                   

                   

                  ---- Original Message -----

                  Sent: Tuesday, February 17, 2009 3:12 PM
                  Subject: Re: [SPAM][biopoet] Re: What Comes Next?

                  Jon Gottschall's Literature, Science, and A New Humanities, Flesch's Comeuppance . . .Biological Components of Fiction, Herman's (ed) Narrative Theory and the Cognitive Sciences, Zunshine's Why We Read Fiction: Theory of Mind and the Novel.  These are the literary ones.  If I didn't have a job I'd have time to list the non-literary ones. JT

                  Jeff P. Turpin, President
                  Turpin and Sons Inc.
                  Cultural Resource Management
                  2047 Lakeshore, Canyon Lake, TX 78133
                  (512) 922-7826
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Tuesday, February 17, 2009 1:21 PM
                  Subject: [SPAM][biopoet] Re: What Comes Next?

                  Jeff T:I've seen four versions of "The Next Big Thing" in the last year..
                   
                  ..which are? 

                • Tom Dolack
                  Speaking of the Flesch book, does anybody know if he s published a version of that as an article? Half of the book I thought was brilliant (the stuff on
                  Message 8 of 11 , Feb 17, 2009
                    Speaking of the Flesch book, does anybody know if he's published a
                    version of that as an article? Half of the book I thought was brilliant
                    (the stuff on altruism) and the other half fell completely flat, and I'd
                    love to read a solid 30 pages on the basic idea rather than a
                    book-that-should-have-been-an-article. I recall he falls into the trap
                    of overstating his thesis: "this is the origin of narrative" rather than
                    "this is one of probably a dozen origins of narrative" (not unlike
                    various theories of the origin of human intelligence). Basic searches
                    don't appear to turn up anything, but you never know.

                    Also of (brief) note:
                    http://papercuts.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/02/16/how-would-darwin-read/?hp



                    Jeff P. Turpin wrote:
                    >
                    > Jon Gottschall's /Literature, Science, and A New Humanities/, Flesch's
                    > /Comeuppance . . .Biological Components of Fiction/, Herman's (ed)
                    > /Narrative Theory and the Cognitive Sciences/, Zunshine's /Why We Read
                    > Fiction: Theory of Mind and the Novel/. These are the literary ones.
                    > If I didn't have a job I'd have time to list the non-literary ones. JT
                    >
                    > Jeff P. Turpin, President
                    > Turpin and Sons Inc.
                    > Cultural Resource Management
                    > 2047 Lakeshore, Canyon Lake, TX 78133
                    > (512) 922-7826
                    >
                    > ----- Original Message -----
                    > *From:* Mike Tintner <mailto:tintner@...>
                    > *To:* biopoet@yahoogroups .com <mailto:biopoet@yahoogroups.com>
                    > *Sent:* Tuesday, February 17, 2009 1:21 PM
                    > *Subject:* [SPAM][biopoet] Re: What Comes Next?
                    >
                    > Jeff T:I've seen four versions of "The Next Big Thing" in the last
                    > year..
                    >
                    > ..which are?
                    >
                    >
                  • Jeff P. Turpin
                    What did Shakespeare say about unseemly haste? Guess I won t get to read any fiction this summer after all. By the way, is that Style compendium out to
                    Message 9 of 11 , Feb 17, 2009
                      What did Shakespeare say about "unseemly haste?"  Guess I won't get to read any fiction this summer after all.  By the way, is that Style compendium out to anyone yet?  They've cashed my check, but not hard copy in the mailbox. JT

                      Jeff P. Turpin, President
                      Turpin and Sons Inc.
                      Cultural Resource Management
                      2047 Lakeshore, Canyon Lake, TX 78133
                      (512) 922-7826
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      Sent: Tuesday, February 17, 2009 4:09 PM
                      Subject: [SPAM][biopoet] Re: What Comes Next?

                      Here is a little more bibliography, from a recent summary:
                       

                      Over the past three or four years, the number of scholars publishing in this area has increased dramatically. Since Carroll published Literary Darwinism in 2004, many new essays and books taking this approach have been published or are in press. The volume edited by Gottschall and Wilson, The Literary Animal (2005), garnered international attention, with commentaries in The New York Times, Science, Nature, and many newspapers and magazines in England and Europe . Other recently published books taking this approach include Headlam Wells’ Shakespeare’s Humanism (Cambridge UP 2005), Headlam Wells’ and McFadden’s edited collection Human Nature: Fact and Fiction (Continuum 2006), Lisa Zunshine’s Why We Read Fiction (Ohio State 2006), Peter Swirski’s Of Literature and Knowledge (Routledge 2007), Marcus Nordlund’s Shakespeare and the Nature of Love (Northwestern UP 2007), David Bordwell’s Poetics of Cinema (Routledge 2008), Jon Gottschall’s two books The Rape of Troy (Cambridge UP, 2008) and Literature, Science, and a New Humanities (Palgrave 2008), and Denis Dutton’s The Art Instinct (Bloomsbury 2009). Books in press include Brian Boyd’s On the Origin of Stories (Harvard UP), Harold Fromm’s From Ecology to Consciousness (Johns Hopkins), Torben Grodal’s Embodied Visions (Oxford UP), and books for which I don’t yet have titles by Clint MacHann (Ashgate), Judith Saunders (McFarland), Nancy Easterlin (Johns Hopkins UP), and Blakey Vermeule (Johns Hopkins UP).

                      Brian Boyd, Joseph Carroll, and Jonathan Gottschall have just finished editing an anthology bringing together a large selection of older and more recent work in the field, Evolution, Literature, Film: A Reader.

                      Along with all these books and lectures, there have of course been many articles published in the field, both in journals geared toward social scientists and in journals geared toward humanists. In the fall of 2008, a special double issue of the journal Style (vol. 42, nos. 2 & 3) was devoted exclusively to literary Darwinism. For this special issue, Joseph Carroll wrote a “target” article, “An Evolutionary Paradigm for Literary Study.” Thirty-five scholars wrote responses to the target article, and Carroll wrote a rejoinder to the responses.

                      ---- Original Message -----

                      Sent: Tuesday, February 17, 2009 3:12 PM
                      Subject: Re: [SPAM][biopoet] Re: What Comes Next?

                      Jon Gottschall's Literature, Science, and A New Humanities, Flesch's Comeuppance . . .Biological Components of Fiction, Herman's (ed) Narrative Theory and the Cognitive Sciences, Zunshine's Why We Read Fiction: Theory of Mind and the Novel.  These are the literary ones.  If I didn't have a job I'd have time to list the non-literary ones. JT

                      Jeff P. Turpin, President
                      Turpin and Sons Inc.
                      Cultural Resource Management
                      2047 Lakeshore, Canyon Lake, TX 78133
                      (512) 922-7826
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      Sent: Tuesday, February 17, 2009 1:21 PM
                      Subject: [SPAM][biopoet] Re: What Comes Next?

                      Jeff T:I've seen four versions of "The Next Big Thing" in the last year..
                       
                      ..which are? 

                    • Joseph Carroll
                      Jeff, I d write them. The hard copy is available. They should have sent it by now. In any case, here is a pdf. Joe ... From: Jeff P. Turpin To:
                      Message 10 of 11 , Feb 17, 2009
                        Jeff, I'd write them. The hard copy is available. They should have sent it by now.  In any case, here is a pdf.
                         
                        Joe
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        Sent: Tuesday, February 17, 2009 5:04 PM
                        Subject: Re: [SPAM][biopoet] Re: What Comes Next?

                        What did Shakespeare say about "unseemly haste?"  Guess I won't get to read any fiction this summer after all.  By the way, is that Style compendium out to anyone yet?  They've cashed my check, but not hard copy in the mailbox. JT

                        Jeff P. Turpin, President
                        Turpin and Sons Inc.
                        Cultural Resource Management
                        2047 Lakeshore, Canyon Lake, TX 78133
                        (512) 922-7826
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        Sent: Tuesday, February 17, 2009 4:09 PM
                        Subject: [SPAM][biopoet] Re: What Comes Next?

                        Here is a little more bibliography, from a recent summary:
                         

                        Over the past three or four years, the number of scholars publishing in this area has increased dramatically. Since Carroll published Literary Darwinism in 2004, many new essays and books taking this approach have been published or are in press. The volume edited by Gottschall and Wilson, The Literary Animal (2005), garnered international attention, with commentaries in The New York Times, Science, Nature, and many newspapers and magazines in England and Europe . Other recently published books taking this approach include Headlam Wells’ Shakespeare’s Humanism (Cambridge UP 2005), Headlam Wells’ and McFadden’s edited collection Human Nature: Fact and Fiction (Continuum 2006), Lisa Zunshine’s Why We Read Fiction (Ohio State 2006), Peter Swirski’s Of Literature and Knowledge (Routledge 2007), Marcus Nordlund’s Shakespeare and the Nature of Love (Northwestern UP 2007), David Bordwell’s Poetics of Cinema (Routledge 2008), Jon Gottschall’s two books The Rape of Troy (Cambridge UP, 2008) and Literature, Science, and a New Humanities (Palgrave 2008), and Denis Dutton’s The Art Instinct (Bloomsbury 2009). Books in press include Brian Boyd’s On the Origin of Stories (Harvard UP), Harold Fromm’s From Ecology to Consciousness (Johns Hopkins), Torben Grodal’s Embodied Visions (Oxford UP), and books for which I don’t yet have titles by Clint MacHann (Ashgate), Judith Saunders (McFarland), Nancy Easterlin (Johns Hopkins UP), and Blakey Vermeule (Johns Hopkins UP).

                        Brian Boyd, Joseph Carroll, and Jonathan Gottschall have just finished editing an anthology bringing together a large selection of older and more recent work in the field, Evolution, Literature, Film: A Reader.

                        Along with all these books and lectures, there have of course been many articles published in the field, both in journals geared toward social scientists and in journals geared toward humanists. In the fall of 2008, a special double issue of the journal Style (vol. 42, nos. 2 & 3) was devoted exclusively to literary Darwinism. For this special issue, Joseph Carroll wrote a “target” article, “An Evolutionary Paradigm for Literary Study.” Thirty-five scholars wrote responses to the target article, and Carroll wrote a rejoinder to the responses.

                        ---- Original Message -----

                        Sent: Tuesday, February 17, 2009 3:12 PM
                        Subject: Re: [SPAM][biopoet] Re: What Comes Next?

                        Jon Gottschall's Literature, Science, and A New Humanities, Flesch's Comeuppance . . .Biological Components of Fiction, Herman's (ed) Narrative Theory and the Cognitive Sciences, Zunshine's Why We Read Fiction: Theory of Mind and the Novel.  These are the literary ones.  If I didn't have a job I'd have time to list the non-literary ones. JT

                        Jeff P. Turpin, President
                        Turpin and Sons Inc.
                        Cultural Resource Management
                        2047 Lakeshore, Canyon Lake, TX 78133
                        (512) 922-7826
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        Sent: Tuesday, February 17, 2009 1:21 PM
                        Subject: [SPAM][biopoet] Re: What Comes Next?

                        Jeff T:I've seen four versions of "The Next Big Thing" in the last year..
                         
                        ..which are? 

                      • Jeff P. Turpin
                        Thanks Joe. I will track them down and get mine (since I plan to pirate the whole thing for my dissertation! ;-). JT Jeff P. Turpin, President Turpin and Sons
                        Message 11 of 11 , Feb 18, 2009
                          Thanks Joe.  I will track them down and get mine (since I plan to pirate the whole thing for my dissertation! ;-). JT

                          Jeff P. Turpin, President
                          Turpin and Sons Inc.
                          Cultural Resource Management
                          2047 Lakeshore, Canyon Lake, TX 78133
                          (512) 922-7826
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          Sent: Tuesday, February 17, 2009 6:17 PM
                          Subject: Re: [SPAM][biopoet] Re: What Comes Next?

                          Jeff, I'd write them. The hard copy is available. They should have sent it by now.  In any case, here is a pdf.
                           
                          Joe
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          Sent: Tuesday, February 17, 2009 5:04 PM
                          Subject: Re: [SPAM][biopoet] Re: What Comes Next?

                          What did Shakespeare say about "unseemly haste?"  Guess I won't get to read any fiction this summer after all.  By the way, is that Style compendium out to anyone yet?  They've cashed my check, but not hard copy in the mailbox. JT

                          Jeff P. Turpin, President
                          Turpin and Sons Inc.
                          Cultural Resource Management
                          2047 Lakeshore, Canyon Lake, TX 78133
                          (512) 922-7826
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          Sent: Tuesday, February 17, 2009 4:09 PM
                          Subject: [SPAM][biopoet] Re: What Comes Next?

                          Here is a little more bibliography, from a recent summary:
                           

                          Over the past three or four years, the number of scholars publishing in this area has increased dramatically. Since Carroll published Literary Darwinism in 2004, many new essays and books taking this approach have been published or are in press. The volume edited by Gottschall and Wilson, The Literary Animal (2005), garnered international attention, with commentaries in The New York Times, Science, Nature, and many newspapers and magazines in England and Europe . Other recently published books taking this approach include Headlam Wells’ Shakespeare’s Humanism (Cambridge UP 2005), Headlam Wells’ and McFadden’s edited collection Human Nature: Fact and Fiction (Continuum 2006), Lisa Zunshine’s Why We Read Fiction (Ohio State 2006), Peter Swirski’s Of Literature and Knowledge (Routledge 2007), Marcus Nordlund’s Shakespeare and the Nature of Love (Northwestern UP 2007), David Bordwell’s Poetics of Cinema (Routledge 2008), Jon Gottschall’s two books The Rape of Troy (Cambridge UP, 2008) and Literature, Science, and a New Humanities (Palgrave 2008), and Denis Dutton’s The Art Instinct (Bloomsbury 2009). Books in press include Brian Boyd’s On the Origin of Stories (Harvard UP), Harold Fromm’s From Ecology to Consciousness (Johns Hopkins), Torben Grodal’s Embodied Visions (Oxford UP), and books for which I don’t yet have titles by Clint MacHann (Ashgate), Judith Saunders (McFarland), Nancy Easterlin (Johns Hopkins UP), and Blakey Vermeule (Johns Hopkins UP).

                          Brian Boyd, Joseph Carroll, and Jonathan Gottschall have just finished editing an anthology bringing together a large selection of older and more recent work in the field, Evolution, Literature, Film: A Reader.

                          Along with all these books and lectures, there have of course been many articles published in the field, both in journals geared toward social scientists and in journals geared toward humanists. In the fall of 2008, a special double issue of the journal Style (vol. 42, nos. 2 & 3) was devoted exclusively to literary Darwinism. For this special issue, Joseph Carroll wrote a “target” article, “An Evolutionary Paradigm for Literary Study.” Thirty-five scholars wrote responses to the target article, and Carroll wrote a rejoinder to the responses.

                          ---- Original Message -----

                          Sent: Tuesday, February 17, 2009 3:12 PM
                          Subject: Re: [SPAM][biopoet] Re: What Comes Next?

                          Jon Gottschall's Literature, Science, and A New Humanities, Flesch's Comeuppance . . .Biological Components of Fiction, Herman's (ed) Narrative Theory and the Cognitive Sciences, Zunshine's Why We Read Fiction: Theory of Mind and the Novel.  These are the literary ones.  If I didn't have a job I'd have time to list the non-literary ones. JT

                          Jeff P. Turpin, President
                          Turpin and Sons Inc.
                          Cultural Resource Management
                          2047 Lakeshore, Canyon Lake, TX 78133
                          (512) 922-7826
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          Sent: Tuesday, February 17, 2009 1:21 PM
                          Subject: [SPAM][biopoet] Re: What Comes Next?

                          Jeff T:I've seen four versions of "The Next Big Thing" in the last year..
                           
                          ..which are? 

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