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Re: [biopoet] Re: The Death of...Everything

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  • Stephen Berer
    Dear Mike, ... Thanks. Very helpful clarification. I am assuming that you are NOT declaring an end to the social hierarchy, including the clear and extreme
    Message 1 of 12 , Jun 16, 2008
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      Dear Mike,

      The multimedia net is breaking the last remaining hierarchy in modern society - the hierarchy of "talented" individuals, (and the hierarchy of "creative" vs "uncreative" individuals). ...

      Thanks. Very helpful clarification. I am assuming that you are NOT declaring an end to the social hierarchy,  including the clear and extreme differences of talent that exist in human endeavors (altho your words imply that you are declaring such an end). I am interpreting your words as implying that the limitations on expression, the peer reviews and committees and editors that declare what is good and worthy of support/publication, will be more limited in their control and censorship. They will still determine, largely, elite status, but progressively the public will have a better shot at being final arbiters, even in the short run.  (IMO, in the long run, the public has always tended to prevail. For example, look at Nobel Prize winners in literature from 1920-40, and see how many are still being read; not many.) But now the flood gates are opening on publishing/blogging personal knowledge/opinion.

      Please correct me if I've interpreted you incorrectly.
      Steve Berer
    • Mike Tintner
      Stephen:I am assuming that you are NOT declaring an end to the social hierarchy, including the clear and extreme differences of talent that exist in human
      Message 2 of 12 , Jun 17, 2008
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        Stephen:I am assuming that you are NOT
        declaring an end to the social hierarchy, including the clear and extreme
        differences of talent that exist in human endeavors (altho your words imply
        that you are declaring such an end).
         
        Yes, I am declaring that - i.e. just as feudal beliefs that everyone should know and stick to their station, collapsed with the printed book, so - but much faster - will contemporary beliefs that there is a natural hierarchy of talents, collapse with the multimedia internet.
         
        There will still be actual hierarchies of ability, but we won't have any illusions anymore that they have anything to do with fictional "talents" -  rather than quantity and quality of work/practice. See the work of scientists like K. Anders Ericsson for a pointer to the future.
         
        The arts are particularly important because they are traditionally seen (wrongly) as the preserve of creativity and imagination, which are also still seen as exclusive to some. No, everyone can be an artist, or scientist, or technologist - creative or hack.
      • Stephen Berer
        ... Well, Mike, I think you re flat-out wrong. Everyone can t be, and everyone won t be. Same as it always was. -- Steve
        Message 3 of 12 , Jun 17, 2008
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          Mike wrote:

          No, everyone can be an artist, or scientist, or technologist - creative or hack.

          Well, Mike, I think you're flat-out wrong. Everyone can't be, and everyone won't be. Same as it always was.

          -- Steve
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