Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

FW: [evol-psych] Article: Computer Poetry Pushes The Genre Envelope

Expand Messages
  • William Benzon
    ... From: Robert Karl Stonjek Reply-To: Date: Tue, 18 Sep 2007 09:41:31 -0000 To:
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 18, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      FW: [evol-psych] Article: Computer Poetry Pushes The Genre Envelope
      ------ Forwarded Message
      From: Robert Karl Stonjek <stonjek@...>
      Reply-To: <evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com>
      Date: Tue, 18 Sep 2007 09:41:31 -0000
      To: <evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com>
      Subject: [evol-psych] Article: Computer Poetry Pushes The Genre Envelope

       
       
       

      Computer Poetry Pushes The Genre Envelope
      Science Daily <http://www.sciencedaily.com/>  ˜ What happens to poetry in the Digital Age? In one of the first academic works in the field, Swedish researcher Maria Engberg has studied how the ability of the computer to combine words, images, movement, and sounds is impacting both writing and reading.

      The dissertation, to be publicly defended on September 14, has been jointly submitted at Uppsala University and the Blekinge Institute of Technology.

      "The way digital poetry experiments with language raises questions and challenges conceptions of literature that were formed by printed books," says Maria Engberg, who has examined what this entails for literary scholarship.

      She has analyzed works by English-speaking poets such as John Cayley, Stephanie Strickland, and Thomas Swiss. The focus is on space, time, movement, and word and image constructions. The poems were written, or rather created, with the help of computer technology and published on the Internet or CDs, for instance.

      Some of the works can be experienced as three-dimensional installations, created in space using so-called vr-cubes and augmented-reality environments. Maria Engberg examines how the forms of the poems construct different reader roles that challenge traditional views of poetry and reading, formed by the visual conventions of the printed page.

      "Reading becomes one way to use the poem, and the reader becomes an active co-player. But the poems can also eliminate that possibility, leaving the reader to be a viewer looking at the digital poem, which, like a poetic film, blends words, images, sounds, and movements into a whole," she explains.

      In recent years literary research has come to focus more and more on visual forms, and digital poetry brings to a head this concern with the visual.

      How should we examine, analyze, and interpret literature that violates the boundaries between genres" In relation to this issue Maria Engberg also discusses the materiality of literature, that is, its medium, visual appearance, and cultural context. This can involve questions regarding the importance of the appearance and placement of letters, or how music and words interact.

      "For instance, how do we read a poem whose verses are obscured by images of stars and constellations?"

      Source: Uppsala University
      http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070912094045.htm

      Posted by
      Robert Karl Stonjek
         


      ------ End of Forwarded Message
    • Mike Tintner
      In recent years literary research has come to focus more and more on visual forms, Sounds v. interesting. Can anyone give examples of this?
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 19, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        "In recent years literary research has come to focus more and more on visual
        forms,"
         
        Sounds v. interesting. Can anyone give examples of this?
      • Stephen Berer
        Dang, I know I should keep my big mouth shut, but as a writer of poetry, this just sounds like so much hogwash in a bucket. Sorry guys. It may have important
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 19, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
                   Dang, I know I should keep my big mouth shut, but as a writer of poetry, this just sounds like so much hogwash in a bucket. Sorry guys. It may have important programming implications, but as literature, it's totally fake. It doesn't push the boundaries of *my* genre envelop one micron. And no, it doesn't intimidate me. Literature is dialogic, not some programming feat or some clever attempt at verisimilitude. There's no dialog with a computer, and if the programmer has something to say (to me, at least), she needs to say it herself, by damn. I'll say it again, this may have very important (and very dangerous) implications for computer programming, but it is not literature. Not in *my* world, anyway.
                   Steve Berer

          "In recent years literary research has come to focus more and more on visual
          forms,"

           
          Sounds v. interesting. Can anyone give examples of this?
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.