Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

272RE: [biopoet] Re:Dennett - apology

Expand Messages
  • Tom Dolack
    Mar 2 11:12 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      Re: [biopoet] Re:Dennett

      If it makes you feel any better, Chris (or should I just call you “homerow”?) I agree with your statement in general that biopoetic close reading still needs to catch up to the more theoretical approaches, but the last year or two--which JC’s post points out--has done much to begin to fill this gap.

       

      -----Original Message-----
      From: biopoet@yahoogroups.com [mailto:biopoet@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of sadf sadf
      Sent: Thursday, March 02, 2006 6:56 AM
      To: biopoet@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [biopoet] Re:Dennett - apology

       

      Thanks very much for the info; it seems that UK libaries have a lot of catching up to do in this field. I will try and do my research before sounding of again.

      Chris

      William Benzon <bbenzon@...> wrote:




      on 3/2/06 7:21 AM, Joseph Carroll at jcarroll@... wrote:


      "It seems that many literary texts are about love and the origins of man; rich pickings, no? It seems strange that these two themes are the least examnined, but poetienally yeid the greatest fruits. Why are they so seldomi examined, is becuase its old news and i am behind the times?"

                  
      **********  
       
                  Actually "love" and family relations are among the most frequent themes in Darwinian literary criticism.  Here below are a couple of paragraphs surveying some of this literature (
      Adaptationist Literary Study: An Introductory Guide,” Ometeca 10 (2006): 18-31)..  If anyone wishes for more particulars on any of the citations, let me know and I'll send them along.
       
          
                  One of the most prominent topics in evolutionary psychology is mate-selection strategy.  As it happens, that is also one of the most prominent subjects or themes in literature.  Love stories, in one form or another, probably form a preponderance of all narratives.  (There is an opportunity here for a set of quantitative studies on the actual proportions of such topics in folk tales and in world literature, with an eye to differences in proportion in different cultural ecologies.)  


      One might start with Patrick Hogan’s The Mind and It’s Stories. Hogan has no quantitative methodology but has read widely in many literatures, including collections of oral tales, and finds that love stories are the most frequent type of story. He even hazards informal estimates of percentage, but those cannot be taken seriously, nor do I think he intends us to.

      Bill B
      --

      William L. Benzon
      708 Jersey Avenue, Apt. 2A
      Jersey City, NJ 07302
      201 217-1010

      "You won't get a wild heroic ride to heaven on pretty little sounds."--George Ives

      Mind-Culture Coevolution: http://asweknowit.ca/evcult/


       


      To help you stay safe and secure online, we've developed the all new Yahoo! Security Centre.

    • Show all 6 messages in this topic