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Big Book Study - Post #4

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  • honey_dot_com
    Good morning, everyone! Hope you had a great weekend. We re still on page xvii of the Foreword to the Second Edition. They describe two centers of activity
    Message 1 of 80 , Jul 1, 2002
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      Good morning, everyone! Hope you had a great weekend.

      We're still on page xvii of the Foreword to the Second Edition. They
      describe two centers of activity around 1936. AA group #3 was
      founded in Cleveland, and by late 1937 there were 40 members sober in
      this nameless group of drunks. Bill returned to Akron and, with 18
      others, decided to: (1) open a chain of hospitals, (2) use paid
      missionaries to spread the word, and (3) write a book.

      Up until this time the society was nameless. In the process of
      writing the book and naming it, our Fellowship received its name.
      There were several titles being considered for the book:

      "The Way Out"
      "100 Men"
      "Comes the Dawn"

      …among others. (We could have been known as "Way Outs" instead of
      AAs!) They settled on "Alcoholics Anonymous" and our society took the
      title of the book to be the name of our fellowship.

      Turning to page xix, paragraph 1: the evolution of the 12 Traditions
      is described and confirmed in 1950.

      At the top of page xx we see the statistics of success:

      "50% got sober at once and remained that way; 25% sobered up after
      some relapses...".

      Unfortunately we cannot boast of such numbers today. What is the
      reason? Why aren't we as successful as they were in the past, circa
      1955? Good discussion topic – have at it.

      The Doctor's Opinion – page xxiii – was originally found on page 1 of
      the main text in 1939 when the first edition of the book was
      published. It was moved to the section preceding the main section of
      the text in successive editions because of comment from literary
      figures. The patient described in paragraph 2 of the letter is Bill
      Wilson in November of 1934 at Towns Hospital. The doctor is William
      D. Silkworth, "the little doctor who loved drunks," who treated
      cocaine addicts and alcoholics.

      "We of Alcoholics Anonymous believe that the reader will be
      interested in the medical estimate of the plan of recovery described
      in this book. Convincing testimony must surely come from medical men
      who have had experience with the sufferings of our members and have
      witnessed our return to health. A well known doctor, chief physician
      at a nationally prominent hospital specializing in alcoholic and drug
      addiction, gave Alcoholics Anonymous this letter:

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      To Whom It May Concern:
      I have specialized in the treatment of alcoholism for many years.

      In late 1934 I attended a patient who, though he had been a competent
      business man of good earning capacity, was an alcoholic of a type I
      had come to regard as hopeless.

      In the course of his third treatment he acquired certain ideas
      concerning a possible means of recovery. As part of his
      rehabilitation he commenced to present his conceptions to other
      alcoholics, impressing upon them that they must do likewise with
      still others. This has become the basis of a rapidly growing
      fellowship of these men and their families. This man and over one
      hundred others appear to have recovered.

      I personally know scores of cases who were of the type with whom
      other methods had failed completely.

      These facts appear to be of extreme medical importance; because of
      the extraordinary possibilities of rapid growth inherent in this
      group they may mark a new epoch in the annals of alcoholism. These
      men may well have a remedy for thousands of such situations.

      You may rely absolutely on anything they say about themselves.

      Very truly yours,

      (Signed) - - - - -M.D."

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      At the end of the letter on page xxiv, Dr. Silkworth DID NOT SIGN the
      letter in the first edition of the book. Anyone venture a guess why?

      Tomorrow, we'll start from the end of that letter on page xxiv and
      probably finish the Doctor's Opinion.

      Love,
      Honey
    • Jim K
      Good morning everyone! We re still on page xvii of the foreword to the second edition. The book describes two centers of activity around 1936. AA s group
      Message 80 of 80 , Feb 24
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        Good morning everyone!

        We're still on page xvii of the foreword to the second edition. The book describes two centers of activity around 1936. AA's group number three was founded in Cleveland, Clarence S. was a major factor in the success of AA in Cleveland (he started the first group to use the name "Alcoholics Anonymous"), and by late 1937 there were 40 members sober in this nameless group of drunks. Bill returned to Akron and, with 18 others, decided to: (1) open a chain of hospitals, (2) use paid missionaries to spread the word, and (3) write a book.

        Up until this time the society was nameless. In the process of writing the book and naming it (1938), our Fellowship received its name. There were several titles being considered for the book: "The Way Out," "100 Men," "Comes the Dawn," among others. (We could have been known as "Way Outs" instead of AAs!) They settled on "Alcoholics Anonymous" and our society took the title of the book to be the name of our fellowship.

        Turning topage xix, paragraph 1, the evolution of the 12 Traditions is described and confirmed in 1950. At the top of page xx we see the statistics of success: "Of those alcoholics who came to AA and really tried 50% got sober at once and remained that way; 25% sobered up after some relapses...". Can we boast of such numbers today?

        The Doctor's Opinion - page xxiii(page xxv in the 4th Edition) was originally found on page 1 of the main text in 1939 when the first edition of the book was published. It was moved to the section preceding the main section of the text in the second edition because of comment from literary figures. The patient described in paragraph 2 of the letter is Bill Wilson in November of 1934 atTowns Hospital. The doctor is William D. Silkworth, "the little doctor who loved drunks," who treated cocaine addicts and alcoholics.

        `````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````
        "We of Alcoholics Anonymous believe that the reader will be interested in the medical estimate of the plan of recovery described in this book. Convincing testimony must surely come from medical men who have had experience with the sufferings of our members and have witnessed our return to health. A well known doctor, chief physician at a nationally prominent hospital specializing in alcoholic and drug addiction, gave Alcoholics Anonymous this letter:

        To Whom It May Concern:
        I have specialized in the treatment of alcoholism for many years.

        In late 1934 I attended a patient who, though he had been a competent business man of good earning capacity, was an alcoholic of a type I had come to regard as hopeless.
        In the course of his third treatment he acquired certain ideas concerning a possible means of recovery. As part of his rehabilitation he commenced to present his conceptions to other alcoholics, impressing upon them that they must do likewise with still others. This has become the basis of a rapidly growing fellowship of these men and their families. This man and over one hundred others appear to have recovered.

        I personally know scores of cases who were of the type with whom other methods had failed completely.

        These facts appear to be of extreme medical importance; because of the extraordinary possibilities of rapid growth inherent in this group they may mark a new epoch in the annals of alcoholism. These men may well have a remedy for thousands of such situations.

        You may rely absolutely on anything they say about themselves.

        Very truly yours,

        (Signed) - - - - -M.D."
        `````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````

        At the end of the letter on page xxiv, Dr. Silkworth DID NOT SIGN the letter in the first edition of the book. With our next post we'll discuss why he didn't sign that letter. Then we'll finish the Doctor's Opinion.
        Have a great day!
        Jim
        Weekend Spiritual Retreats with Jim - email: jknyc@...
         
         


        It is better to be loved for what you have given
        than to be admired for what you have gained
         
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