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NO A LAS ARMAS... SI A LA PAZ...................NO WEAPONS.....WE WANT PEACE

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  • Comité Pro Rescate y Desarrollo de Vieq
    ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 4, 2005
      >> Weapons Sales Worldwide Rise to Highest Level Since 2000
      >>
      >> By THOM SHANKER
      >> New York Times
      >> August 30, 2005
      >> http://www.nytimes.com/2005/08/30/politics/30weapons.html
      >>
      >> WASHINGTON, Aug. 29 - The value of military weapons
      >> sales worldwide jumped in 2004 to the highest level
      >> since 2000, driven by arms deals with developing
      >> nations, especially India, Saudi Arabia and China,
      >> according to a new Congressional study.
      >>
      >> The total of arms sales and weapons transfer agreements
      >> to both industrialized and developing nations was
      >> nearly $37 billion in 2004, according to the study.
      >>
      >> That total was the largest since 2000, when global arms
      >> sales reached $42.1 billion, and was far above the 2003
      >> figure of $28.5 billion.
      >>
      >> The United States once again dominated global weapons
      >> sales, signing deals worth $12.4 billion in 2004, or
      >> 33.5 percent of all contracts worldwide. But that was
      >> down from $15.1 billion in 2003.
      >>
      >> The share of American arms contracts specifically with
      >> developing nations was $6.9 billion in 2004, or 31.6
      >> percent of all such deals, up slightly from $6.5
      >> billion in 2003.
      >>
      >> Russia was second in global arms sales, with $6.1
      >> billion in agreements, or 16.5 percent of all such
      >> contracts, a notable increase from its $4.4 billion in
      >> sales in 2003. In 2004, Russia signed arms transfer
      >> deals worth $5.9 billion with the developing world,
      >> 27.1 percent of the global total, up from $4.3 billion
      >> in 2003.
      >>
      >> Britain was third in arms transfer agreements to the
      >> developing world in 2004, signing contracts worth $3.2
      >> billion, while Israel ranked fourth, with deals worth
      >> $1.2 billion. France followed with $1 billion.
      >>
      >> The report, "Conventional Arms Transfers to Developing
      >> Nations," is published by the Congressional Research
      >> Service, a division of the Library of Congress.
      >>
      >> The annual study, which was delivered to Congress on
      >> Monday, is considered by academic experts to be the
      >> most thorough compilation of facts and figures on
      >> global weapons sales available in the public domain.
      >>
      >> The study uses figures in 2004 dollars, with figures
      >> for other years adjusted to account for inflation.
      >>
      >> The statistics in the report "illustrate how global
      >> patterns of conventional arms transfers have changed in
      >> the post-cold-war and post-Persian-Gulf-war years,"
      >> Richard F. Grimmett, a specialist in national defense
      >> at the Congressional Research Service, wrote in the
      >> introduction to the study.
      >>
      >> "Relationships between arms suppliers and recipients
      >> continue to evolve in response to changing political,
      >> military and economic circumstances," he said.
      >> "Nonetheless, the developing world continues to be the
      >> primary focus of foreign arms sales activity by
      >> conventional weapons suppliers."
      >>
      >> The study found that arms sales to developing nations
      >> in 2004 totaled nearly $21.8 billion, a substantial
      >> increase over the $15.1 billion in 2003. That was 58.9
      >> percent of all arms sales agreements worldwide for last
      >> year.
      >>
      >> Over the last four years, China has purchased more
      >> weapons than any other nation in the developing world,
      >> signing $10.4 billion in deals from 2001 to 2004. Such
      >> statistics could be used by those in the United States
      >> government who have argued against any decision by the
      >> European Union to lift its arms embargo against China.
      >>
      >> For that same four-year period, India ranked second,
      >> with $7.9 billion in arms purchases, and Egypt was
      >> third, with $6.5 billion in deals.
      >>
      >> But India surpassed China in total purchases in 2004,
      >> agreeing to buy $5.7 billion in arms.
      >>
      >> Saudi Arabia was second in signing arms deals last
      >> year, with contracts valued at $2.9 billion, and China
      >> was third in 2004, signing $2.2 billion in contracts
      >> for arms purchases.
      >>
      >> "Presently, there appear to be fewer large weapons
      >> purchases being made by developing nations in the Near
      >> East," Mr. Grimmett wrote, while relatively larger
      >> purchases are being made by developing nations in Asia,
      >> "led principally by China and India."
      >>
      >> According to the study, the four major West European
      >> arms suppliers - Britain, France, Germany and Italy -
      >> significantly increased their collective share of arms
      >> sales with developing nations between 2003 and 2004,
      >> rising to $4.8 billion in 2004 from $830 million in
      >> 2003.



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