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Asking forgivness of sins

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  • Jeremiah Gooch
    Hello, list, Asking forgiveness of sins after salvation - Why do we do this if our sins, past, present and future are forgiven? I have an idea or two why on
    Message 1 of 43 , Sep 6, 2004
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      Hello, list,

      Asking forgiveness of sins after salvation - Why do we do this if our sins,
      past, present and future are forgiven? I have an idea or two why on the tip
      of my tongue. I can "feel" why. But I can't _explain_ why, indepth and
      bibically at this moment. Any comments from a reformed perspective?
      I have had this question in mind in the past but it was prompted again
      recently after preusing Dan Corner's site
      (http://www.evangelicaloutreach.com/) and viewing an article of his in which
      he argues that our *past* sins have been forgiven upon salvation but, as I
      gather he argues, we must ask forgiveness for any subsequent sins commited.
      This argument (if I read it correctly) would seem to mean that our state of
      salvation is only as good as our last confession (?).

      God bless,
      Jeremiah

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      "All that the Father gives Me will come to Me, and the one who comes to Me I
      will by no means cast out." John 6:37

      "My sheep hear My voice, and I know them, and they follow Me. And I give
      them eternal life, and they shall never perish; neither shall anyone snatch
      them out of My hand." John 10:27-28

      "And God will wipe away every tear from their eyes; there shall be no more
      death, nor sorrow , nor crying. There shall be no more pain, for the former
      thing have passed away." Rev 21:4


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    • Jeff Koenig
      that would be a common figure of speech, the container for the contents, similar to using the term White House to refer to the people inside who run the
      Message 43 of 43 , Oct 9, 2004
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        that would be a common figure of speech, the container for the contents, similar to using the term "White House" to refer to the people inside who run the government.
         
        but, in this context it may refer also to the end of death altogether.
         
        in Rev. 20.13 John says that "death and hades gave up the dead which were in them."  So we know that John knows how to refer distinctly to the people who dwell there, as opposed to the place itself.
         
        then, in 20.13 is says that they were "judged."  but it does not say anyone is sent to the lake of fire.
         
        then in 20.14, he says that "death and Hades were thrown into the lake of fire."
         
        then in 20:15, he say, "if anyone's name was not found written in the book of life, he was thrown into the lake of fire." 
         
        so, 20.14 "could" be a figure of speech meaning that the people in "death and Hades" were thrown into the lake of fire.  But in the very next verse (15) John expressly says that these same people are "thrown" into the lake of fire.
         
        overall, I tend to think that death and Hades being cast in, along with the people, may refer to the end of death in general, not solely to the inhabitants being cast into the lake of fire.  for one thing, there is no more death from this point forward, so there would be no one to go into "hades" or 'death."  (See rev. 21.4, "there shall no longer be any death.")
        -----Original Message-----
        From: supergohanlee [mailto:supergohanlee@...]
        Sent: Thursday, October 07, 2004 12:13 AM
        To: biblicalapologetics@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [biblicalapologetics] Re: Asking forgivness of sins


        I think the passage (Rev 20:14) means that the people who are already
        in Hades as well as the unsaved people at the time of judgment will
        be cast into the lake of fire.  So the "death and Hades" referes to
        the people, rather than the place being eliminated.




        --- In biblicalapologetics@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff Koenig"
        <jkoenig@s...> wrote:
        > Asking forgivness of sinsthe word translated "hell" in KJV is
        hades, not gehenna.
        >
        > KJV Revelation 20:14 And death and hell were cast into the lake of
        fire. This is the second death.
        >
        >
        > NAS Revelation 20:14 And death and Hades were thrown into the lake
        of fire. This is the second death, the lake of fire.
        >
        >
        > Just means that the realm of the dead (hades) is cast into the lake
        of fire.  But it is not clear exactly what that means, or what it
        means for "death" to be cast into the lake of fire.  Maybe the idea
        is that after there is no more death, no more hades.  It makes more
        sense to people or angels/demons to be cast into the lake of fire
        than things like "death" or places like "hades."  When people are
        cast in, I take that literally.  When hades/death is cast in, I think
        the meaning might be figurative.
        >




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