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Collective Consciousness

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  • Tom A.
    I have been talking to a friend who is for the most part I believe is a pantheist. How would you refute this statement from her: I think there is one
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 12, 2008
      I have been talking to a friend who is for the most part I believe is a
      pantheist. How would you refute this statement from her: I think there
      is one consciousness of which we are all a part. This sensuousness
      intervenes in the world since we are all part of it. I believe our
      thoughts individually and collectively has an influence on our lives.
      Hence prayer to me is put forth positive thoughts into the collective
      consciousness.
    • wglmp
      ... a ... there ... lives. ... I wouldn t. I am a monotheist, and I agree with the above. Matt
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 12, 2008
        --- In biblicalapologetics@yahoogroups.com, "Tom A." <tomrabc@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > I have been talking to a friend who is for the most part I believe is
        a
        > pantheist. How would you refute this statement from her: I think
        there
        > is one consciousness of which we are all a part. This sensuousness
        > intervenes in the world since we are all part of it. I believe our
        > thoughts individually and collectively has an influence on our
        lives.
        > Hence prayer to me is put forth positive thoughts into the collective
        > consciousness.
        >

        I wouldn't. I am a monotheist, and I agree with the above.

        Matt
      • Robert M. Bowman, Jr.
        Tom, You wrote:
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 13, 2008
          Tom,

          You wrote:

          << I have been talking to a friend who is for the most part I believe
          is a pantheist. How would you refute this statement from her: I
          think there is one consciousness of which we are all a part. This
          sensuousness intervenes in the world since we are all part of it. I
          believe our thoughts individually and collectively has an influence
          on our lives. Hence prayer to me is put forth positive thoughts into
          the collective consciousness. >>

          Her words, "I think...," refutes her position. The fact is that there
          is no one universal consciousness, or we would all know the same
          things and would not have any disagreement about this issue. The
          words "I think" in this context obviously contrast with "while others
          think differently," which is inconsistent with the idea of a
          universal or collective consciousness.

          Think of the Borg in Star Trek. Their minds think as one, and thus
          there is never any disagreement, and everyone knows what everyone
          thinks. That's why a Borg will never say "I think." They say, "We are
          the Borg. Resistance is futile...." In reality, human minds are not a
          single collective or universal consciousness. They are distinct minds
          with their own private thoughts, and resistance is most definitely
          not futile.

          Of course, to redefine "prayer" as putting forth thoughts into the
          collective consciousness is not only incoherent (if there is a
          collective consciousness, those thoughts are already there!), but it
          is a misappropriation of religious language. This would be like a
          Christian saying, "Reincarnation to me is the one-time, future
          resurrection from the dead to immortal life that only those who are
          redeemed by the Lord Jesus Christ will receive by God's grace." You
          can say it, but it's meaningless, because that is simply not what
          reincarnation means. Likewise, prayer does not mean sending out good
          thoughts to a collective consciousness.

          In Christ's service,
          Rob Bowman
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