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2830Re: On the One God and the Trinity

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  • William
    Apr 2, 2010
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      Isa,

      Without going back to review my notes and do some research on specific points, which I will try to do soon, one point that popped out that I immediately know the problem with is the immutability of God. Scripture does not require this. What scripture states is that God DOES not change. Immutability requires that God cannot change. Does not change merely requires that either God is incapable of change, which you assume is the answer, or that God chooses not to change, that is He is capable of change but will not do so. Given that there are two potential understandings of this point, your assertions weaken when you do not consider both and provide reasons why the specific understanding you choose is the best.

      Likewise, if I remember correctly, you have asserted that God is a person. Could you please provide an objective understanding of what a person is? Science has observed that some nonhumans species might well fit the definition of a person by most objective standards, while humans in a permanent vegetative state probably would not. However, to define a person as being either human or deity and nothing else is not an objective persepective, but rather assumption, which may be challenged.

      Bill

      --- In biblicalapologetics@yahoogroups.com, "Isa" <isalcordo@...> wrote:
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      > Bill, I submit Rob's comment on your comment about "a finite God" as my response. I look forward to your other comments on the paper.
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      > Isa
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      > --- In biblicalapologetics@yahoogroups.com, William Mayor <eliadefollower@> wrote:
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      > > Isa,
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      > > I see one HUGE error in your logic.  You consider God to be infinite, which is fine.  This makes creation to be pantheistic (or possibly panentheistic for those who see a distinction) in nature, as by definition an infinite God cannot have anything excluded from Himself, including creation.  However, you conclude your argument with the statement "It should also bring into focus the unquestioned monotheism of Christianity".  Monotheism and Pantheism are diametrically opposed to each other.  Monotheism MUST have a finite God as it requires a creation that is separate from God.
      > >  
      > > Now I could go through and point out other potential errors, however even without looking at other issues, this one issue sinks your whole argument unless you revise it.
      > >  
      > > Bill
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