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Is Sars Virus An Alien Invader?

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  • Frank B. Yuwono
    http://uk.news.yahoo.com/030523/140/e0nkr.html Sunday May 25, 09:16 AM Is Sars Virus An Alien Invader? The deadly virus Sars may turn out to be an alien
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 1, 2003
      http://uk.news.yahoo.com/030523/140/e0nkr.html
      Sunday May 25, 09:16 AM





      Is Sars Virus An Alien Invader?
      The deadly virus Sars may turn out to be an alien invader from outer
      space, a scientist has claimed.Professor Chandra Wickramasinghe, from
      the University of Cardiff, says there is already evidence that the
      virus which causes severe acute respiratory syndrome is
      extraterrestrial.

      He warned it could still be circulating high in the atmosphere, and
      might fall anywhere on Earth without warning.

      A small group of astrobiologists, led by the professor, believe the
      idea of bugs and viruses arriving on Earth from space is perfectly
      plausible.

      They point to ancient and modern major epidemics which appear
      suddenly and spread in a way that cannot easily be explained.

      Devastating

      Examples include the plague of Athens and the devastating influenza
      pandemic of 1917-19 that killed more people than the First World War.

      In a letter to the Lancet medical journal, Professor Wickramasinghe
      and colleagues in both the UK and India point out that Sars had
      appeared unexpectedly.

      They said: "A small amount of the culprit virus introduced into the
      stratosphere could make a tentative first fall out east of the
      Himalayas, where the stratosphere is thinnest, followed by sporadic
      deposits in neighbouring areas."

      Samples of air taken from 26 miles up in the stratosphere have
      yielded many microbes, but whether or not they are extraterrestrial
      is open to question.

      Fossilised

      Comets are known to contain many organic chemicals, as well as water -
      and NASA claims to have found fossilised microbes in a lump of rock
      blown off the surface of Mars that landed as a meteorite on Earth.

      Professor Wickramasinghe's team estimates that a tonne of bacterial
      material falls to Earth from space daily - equivalent to 20,000
      bacteria per square metre of the Earth's surface.

      The theory is that extraterrestrial micro-organisms and viruses are
      carried around the solar system by comets or meteorites.

      But it puts the scientists at loggerheads with researchers from the
      University of Hong Kong, who are convinced the disease came from
      civet cats, a local delicacy.

      The World Health Organisation has now lifted its warnings of travel
      to Hong Kong, where the number of new cases has been in single digits
      for almost three weeks.

      China, where the virus first broke out, has reported 20 new cases and
      three more deaths, bringing its nationwide death toll to 303 and
      cumulative number of cases to 5,825.

      More than 8,000 people have been infected worldwide - the global
      death toll stands at almost 690.
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