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ToC: EIGHTEENTH CENTURY LIFE

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  • Prof. B.V. Toshev
    Just Received: EIGHTEENTH CENTURY LIFE ISSN 0098-2601 (Duke University Press) Editor: C.D. Reverand II [scan0007] All articles from 2000 to today are
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 21 8:15 AM
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      Just Received:

      EIGHTEENTH CENTURY LIFE ISSN 0098-2601 (Duke University Press)

      Editor: C.D. Reverand II

      scan0007 

      All articles from 2000 to today are available.

      ======================

      ToC: Eighteenth Century Life, Volume 35, Number 1, Winter 2011

      =======================

      P. Sabor. "The Job I Have Perhaps Rashly Undertaken": Publishing the Complete Correspondence of Samuel Richardson (p. 9)

      Notes: 41;

      T. Berg. Trully Yours: Arranging a Letter Collection (p. 29)

      Notes: 29;

      L. Curran. "Into Whosoever Hands Our Letters Might Fall": Samuel Richardson's Correspondence and "the Public Eye" (p. 51)

      Notes: 46;

      C. van Hensbergen. "Why I Write Them, I Can Give No Account": Aphra Behn and "Love-Letters to a Gentleman" (1696) (p. 65)

      Notes: 26;

      J. McTague. "There Is No Such Man as Isaack Bickerstaff": Partridge, Pittis, and Jonathan Swift (p. 83)

      Notes: 43;

      A. Williams. "I Hope to Write as Bad as Ever": Swift's Journal to Stella and the Intimacy of Correspondence (p. 102)

      Notes: 31;

      R. Ballaster. The Economics of Ethical Conversation: The Commerce of the Letter in Eliza Haywood and Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (p. 119)

      Notes: 18;

      N. Pohl. The Plausible Selves of Sarah Scott (1721-95) (p. 133)

      Notes: 41;

      S. Haggarty. "The Ceremonial of Letter for Letter": William Cowper and the Tempo of Epistolary Exchange (p. 149)

      Notes: 24;

      C. Brant. "I Will Carry You with Me on the Wings of Immagination": Aerial Letters and Eighteenth-Century Ballooning (p. 168)

      Notes: 28;

      S. Bernard. Postscript: "Tonson's Remains": The Earlieest Letters of Jacob Tonson the Elder (p. 188)

      Notes: 19;

      Review Essays (p. 208): 7 essays.

      =======================

       

       

    • Prof. B.V. Toshev
      Just Received (subscription): EIGHTEENTH CENTURY LIFE ISSN 0098-2601 (Duke University Press) Editor: C.D. Reverand II [ECL_2_2011] All articles from 2000 to
      Message 2 of 7 , May 19, 2011
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        Just Received (subscription):

        EIGHTEENTH CENTURY LIFE ISSN 0098-2601 (Duke University Press)

        Editor: C.D. Reverand II

        ECL_2_2011

        All articles from 2000 to today are available.

        ======================

        ToC: Eighteenth Century Life, Volume 35, Number 2, Spring 2011

        =======================

        M. New. Laurence Sterne's Sermons and The Pulpit-Fool (p. 1)

        Notes: 21

        Because Laurence Sterne suggested that sermons should come from the heart and should be practical rather than polemical, his own sermons have often been read as products of a sentimental and secular midcentury ethos, moral essays without theological meaning. However, the appearance of exactly the same advice in the 4,000 lines of John Dunton's The Pulpit-Fool, published in 1707, serves to alert us to the possibility that Sterne echoes a long tradition of irenic and moral preaching after the religious wars of the seventeenth century. Dunton offers more than 200 preachers, across the Christian spectrum, who are not "fools"—who preach from the heart and preach reconciliation rather than exclusion. It would be useful to students of Sterne to familiarize themselves with just a tenth of this vast body of sermon literature before suggesting that Sterne had no commitment to the religious doctrines he preached during his entire adult life; the writings of John Norris, of Bemerton, highly praised by both Dunton and Sterne, would be a good place to begin.

        A. O'Malley.  Poaching on Crusoe's Island: Popular Reading and Chapbook Editions of Robinson Crusoe (p. 18)

        Notes: 42

        In this essay, the author argues that chapbook editions of Robinson Crusoe should be viewed not simply as impoverished abridgments of Defoe's novel, but as striking examples of the popular "appropriation" of an elite text by plebeian readers. The ruthless editorial decisions required to reduce a 400-page novel to a 24-page chapbook with woodcut illustrations may appear haphazard at times, omitting such vital scenes as Crusoe's discovery of the footprint, for instance, but actually express the preferences, interests, and reading practices of common readers. Popular reading often challenges and confounds the aesthetic and narrative expectations of experienced readers. Similarly, popular chapbook editions of Robinson Crusoe  contest, dispute, and sometimes reject the ideological underpinnings of their elite source text.

        H.E.M. Brooks. Negotiating Marriage and Professional Autonomy in the Careers of Eighteenth-Century Actresses (p. 39)

        Notes: 79

        This essay examines the ways marriage could function both to the benefit and detriment of an actress's professional activities and agency. It argues that an astute marital decision might support and promote an ambitious actress's future on the stage, largely through integrating her into established networks in the profession. It then reveals the ways in which an actress's legal status as feme covert might impact upon her professional agency, particularly in light of her unique position as both trader and object of trade. The essay then goes on to consider how actresses negotiated their ways between the benefits and the liabilities of marriage. "Contract" marriage, or "performing marriage," the essay suggests, was one way in which an actress might maintain her legal, and therefore professional, agency, within the framework of a long-term personal relationship. Some actresses, the essay argues, may have chosen to negotiate their personal and professional lives by cohabiting and living as if married, outside the legal framework of a legitimate union. Such an argument, moreover, opens up a wider awareness of the eighteenth-century business women's choices in marriage.

        P.M. Briggs. Satiric Strategy in Ned Ward's London Writings (p. 76)

        Notes: 21

        This essay examines three satirical works from the most productive decade of Edward (Ned) Ward's long writing career: The London Spy (1698-1700), The London Terraefilius, or, The Satyrical Reformer (1707-08), and The Secret History of Clubs (1709). All three of these colorful London pieces show Ward's wit and blunt humor to good advantage, even as they reveal the breadth of his social vision and sympathies. Taken together, they also display the dynamic evolution of his attempts to combine satire with other forms of literary entertainment, as he moved from satiric travelogue to dramatically imagined satiric characters and then to more socially and thematically complex satiric ensembles. Unfortunately for Ward, the rise of Swift and Pope too soon eclipsed his considerable aptitude for satire.

        A.E. Martin.  Society, and Science: Mrs. Delany and the Art of Botany (Review Essay) (p. 102)

        Notes: 3.

        ======================

        http://xa.yimg.com/kq/groups/20255090/hr/1308370510/name/eitheenth_2.jpg
        ===========================
        eitheenth_1
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        eitheenth_3
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      • Prof. B.V. Toshev
        Just Received (subscription): EIGHTEENTH CENTURY LIFE ISSN 0098-2601 (Duke University Press) Editor: C.D. Reverand II [ECL_2_2011] All articles from 2000 to
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 22, 2011
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          Just Received (subscription):

          EIGHTEENTH CENTURY LIFE ISSN 0098-2601 (Duke University Press)

          Editor: C.D. Reverand II

          ECL_2_2011

          All articles from 2000 to today are available.

          ======================

          ToC: Eighteenth Century Life, Volume 35, Number 3, Fall 2011

          =======================

          S. Rudy. Pope, Swift, and the Poetics of Posterity (p. 1)

          Notes: 49

          Alexander Pope and Jonathan Swift both believed, with varying degrees of self-assuredness, that some part of themselves would outlast their lives. They differed, however, as to precisely what would or could endure. From their earliest works, including Swift's A Tale of a Tub and Pope's Pastorals, through their joint efforts as members of the Scriblerus Club, and on to later achievements, such as The Dunciad, Pope's Imitations of Horace, and Verses on the Death of Dr. Swift, they executed strategies of authorial identitycreation and control designed to achieve ends in purposeful contradistinction. Whereas Pope's belief in the redemptive potential of his own poetic prowess—a belief not always unwavering in the face of the cultural decline he set out to combat—compelled him to give the model of Pope-as-author pride of place in future memory, Swift tended to emphasize the expedient at the expense of textual self-memorializing. This essay examines how their nuanced but fundamental disagreements about the purpose of writing, the value of authorial "remains," and the nature of possible futures constitute the subject of a dialogue that takes place not only in their "private" correspondence, but also through their public poetry and prose.

          http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/5d/Alexander_Pope_by_Michael_Dahl.jpg/483px-Alexander_Pope_by_Michael_Dahl.jpg

          http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4b/Jonathan_Swift_by_Charles_Jervas_detail.jpg

          B. Mudge. "Like as My Profile": Of Monuments, Money, and Political Caricature in Spring 1784 (p. 29)

          Notes: 25

          Situating a reading of Henry Angelo and the English "love of portraiture" between an anxiety about monuments and history on one side and an anxiety about money and fiction on the other, this essay argues for an appreciation of Angelo's Reminiscences that moves past individual anecdotes to larger concerns about English self-representation and the political authority that it alternately appeased and resisted. Specifically, the essay will follow Angelo from an anecdote he tells about George III at a Royal Academy exhibition, through an account of the constitutional crisis of 1783–84, to an explication of several representative caricatures from the famous Westminster election. It focuses on Charles Fox and the ways in which his portraits in particular channel the cultural instabilities of the moment. My purpose is to tease out the nuances with which Angelo treats the interconnections between high and low portraiture in the 1780s in order to highlight the difference between the ways in which monumental portraits occupied public space and political caricatures moved through it. Monuments of all kinds—even of the most mobile variety, busts—were designed to anchor the space in which they were displayed, their immobility implying permanence. Caricatures, on the other hand, moved quickly through urban spaces, temporarily saturating shops, pubs, and coffeehouses before being replaced by their own newest versions. Although scholars of the portrait have been particularly sensitive in recent years to the complexities of exhibition space, this essay extends that discussion out from walls of Somerset House to the streets of Westminster as it refigures the homologies of monumental art and the differentials of caricature in terms of the political authority to which they referred and the monetary systems within which they were embedded.

          ECL_3_figure6



          L. Davis. Imagining the Miscellaneous Nation: James Watson's Choice Collection of Comic and Serious Scots Poems (p. 60)
          Notes: 43

          As the first published anthology of Scottish poetry, the Choice Collection of Comic and Serious Scots Poems has long been regarded as a milestone in Scottish literary history. But acknowledgments of the Choice Collection's importance have historically been coupled with criticisms about its content. In particular, the Collection has been taken to task for its seeming disregard for genre or tone. This essay seeks to reevaluate the assessment of the Choice Collection as a "flawed" text by considering the Collection in relation to several contemporary miscellanies. Furthermore, it investigates the national impulse behind Watson's employment of this particular genre. Recognizing the competing interests at stake in the Scottish political landscape of 1706, Watson uses the imaginative space of the miscellany to bring readers of different tastes and interests together to promote the cause of Scotland at a time when the nation's very existence was under threat. Such a rereading of Watson's collection also contributes toward a reevaluation of the impression that Scottish literature after the Act of Union is pathologically split, a reflection of what G. Gregory Smith referred to as the "Caledonian antisyzygy."

          http://ia600307.us.archive.org/BookReader/BookReaderImages.php?zip=/7/items/watsonschoicecol00watsrich/watsonschoicecol00watsrich_jp2.zip&file=watsonschoicecol00watsrich_jp2/watsonschoicecol00watsrich_0005.jp2&scale=4&rotate=0

          Review Essays:

          E.W. Nye. Absent Signifiers in Jane Austen: Toward an Archaeology of Morals (p. 81)

          http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/cc/CassandraAusten-JaneAusten%28c.1810%29_hires.jpg

          E.T. Bannet. Studies in British and American Epistolary Culture (p. 89)
          Notes: 12;

          N. Meeker. Eighteenth-Century Arts of Love  (p. 104)
          Notes: 3.
          ================


        • Prof. B.V. Toshev
          Just Received (subscription): EIGHTEENTH CENTURY LIFE ISSN 0098-2601 (Duke University Press) Editor: C.D. Reverand II [Cover] All articles from 2000 to today
          Message 4 of 7 , Jan 25, 2012
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            Just Received (subscription):

            EIGHTEENTH CENTURY LIFE ISSN 0098-2601 (Duke University Press)

            Editor: C.D. Reverand II

            Cover

            All articles from 2000 to today are available.

            ======================

            ToC: Eighteenth Century Life, Volume 36, Number 1, Winter 2011

            =======================

            Y. Shapira. Shakespeare, The Castle of Otranto, and the Problem of the Corpse on the Eighteenth-Century Stage (p. 1)

            Notes: 56

            This essay considers the limited presence of the dead body in Horace Walpole's The Castle of Otranto. The near absence of gory death from the novella is striking, given both its intensive borrowing from Shakespeare's Hamlet and its status as the founding work of the Gothic tradition. The essay argues that Walpole's selective use of Shakespearean materials is symptomatic of an eighteenth-century ambivalence towards the use of death as spectacle, an ambivalence that manifests itself in the critical dispute over the stage corpse. The analysis of this dispute reveals two contradictory impulses at work: on the one hand, there is a desire to push such images out of sight in hopes of advancing a more refined sensibility; on the other hand, especially in the latter half of the century, there is a gradual emergence of a patriotic wish to embrace the spectacle of death as part of a native literary tradition, with which Shakespeare's name is rapidly becoming synonymous. The final section of the essay considers The Castle of Otranto's reworking of Shakespeare's macabre materials as a complex and ambiguous reflection of these contradictory urges.

            W.  Shakespeare (1564-1616)

            H. Walpole (1717-1797)

            D. Ruwe. Zenobia, Queen of Palmyra: Adelaide O'Keeffe, the Jewish Conversion Novel, and the Limits of Rational Education (p. 30)

            Notes: 42

            Zenobia, Queen of Palmyra (1814) is a historical novel by the Irish author Adelaide O'Keeffe that features religious conversions from paganism to Judaism, and from Judaism to Christianity. O'Keeffe stages these conversions within the context of late Enlightenment debates about the ability of rational educational approaches to inculcate religious belief. I compare Zenobia to Edgeworth's Harrington, Rousseau'sÉmile, Mme de Genlis' Adéle et Thèodore, and Hamilton's Agrippina. Zenobia applies two popular modes of fictional representation of education to the teaching of religion. The first of these modes is that of the philosophical experiment, most often presented as a utopian pedagogical fantasy in which a child and educator live apart from society and in which various educational approaches and techniques can be applied to the child without outside interference. We find examples of this approach in Rousseau'sÉmile (1762) and Mme de Genlis' Adéle et Thèodore (1782). The second mode is that of practical, applied pedagogy in which teachers contend with outside influences and a child's already-established habits and prior associations. O'Keeffe's particular contribution to pedagogical literature is her use of both modes to represent religious training.

            A. Gollapudi.Selling Celebrity: Actors' Portraits in Bell's Shakespeare and Bell's British Theatre (p. 54)

            Notes: 30

            In the last quarter of the eighteenth century, John Bell commissioned hundreds of actor portraits in dramatic roles, which were published as book illustrations in the series Bell's Shakespeare and Bell's British Theatre. These portraits contributed significantly to the emergent culture of theatrical celebrity. While paintings and engraved prints of actors mostly peddled a mode of celebrity that was sustained by audience applause within the theater walls, Bell's illustrations created a parallel visibility for the performers outside the theater, which was only tenuously and unevenly associated with their stage celebrity. The performers' images circulating through Bell's books realigned the contours of the late eighteenth-century market for theatrical celebrity.

            Portrait of David Garrick as Hamlet, standing three-quarter length to front with hands outstretched, and looking to right, castle backdrop.  1 November 1754
Mezzotint

            Priscilla Kemble (née Hopkins) when Miss Hopkins; as Lavinia in 'Titus Andronicus', after James Roberts, published 1776 - NPG  - © National Portrait Gallery, London

            Review Essays (p. 82): 11 essays

            ========================

            THE BELOGRADCHIK SOCIETY FOR LOCAL HISTORY AND FOLK STUDIES

             

            IN PURSUIT OF EXCELLENCE IN LOCAL HISTORY:
            COLLECTING, PRESERVING, DISSEMINATING 

             

            VENETS: THE BELOGRADCHIK JOURNAL FOR LOCAL HISTORY, CULTURAL HERITAGE AND FOLK STUDIES

            ISSN 1314-0426 (print) ISSN 1314-0256 (online)

            (SCS CONSULTING Ltd)

            http://www.venets.org

            ===================================================

             

             

             

          • Prof. B.V. Toshev
            Just Received (subscription): EIGHTEENTH CENTURY LIFE ISSN 0098-2601 (Duke University Press) Editor: C.D. Reverand II [Cover] All articles from 2000 to today
            Message 5 of 7 , Jun 25, 2012
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              Just Received (subscription):

              EIGHTEENTH CENTURY LIFE ISSN 0098-2601 (Duke University Press)

              Editor: C.D. Reverand II

              Cover

              All articles from 2000 to today are available.

              ======================

              ToC: Eighteenth Century Life, Volume 36, Number 2, Spring 2012

              =======================

              A. Marshall. Fabricating Defoes: From Anonymous Hack to Master of Fictions (p. 1)

              Notes: 79

              The "Defoe" to be found in the major modern biographies and the criticism of the last four decades is a radically different person and writer from earlier Defoes. Although the notion of a "constructed" author is by now an over-worked cliché, Defoe represents an especially problematic case. Dryden, Pope, and Fielding as we now conceive them are constructions built on the basis of relatively clear (if not uncontested) materials; the evidence we possess about them is open to varying interpretations, but we have a considerable amount to work with. More than any other major eighteenth-century writer, however, our Defoe is a construction—one that is both relatively recent and of dubious validity. Until the 1960s, Defoe was regarded as a sloppy hack writer who happened to write a few interesting novels. In the last fifty years, his reputation has changed drastically: critics have reconceived him as a brilliant fiction-writer, a master craftsman, and the father of the novel. Defoe is treated very much like other canonical eighteenth-century authors, but he represents a different kind of writer and a unique set of problems, and we should therefore rethink the way we regard him and interpret his writings. For a variety of reasons—having to do with the nature of his life and work, the lack of much personal record, the anonymity and attribution problems—we are simply not on solid ground, as we are with Dryden, Pope, Fielding, or Swift.

              J. Dryden (1631-1700)

              A. Pope (1688-1744)

              H. Fielding (1707-1754)

              J. Swift (1667-1745)

              M. Vareschi. Attribution and Repetition: The Case of Defoe and the Circulating Library (p. 36)

              Notes: 49

              While much scholarly attention has been paid to attributing or de-attributing the texts associated with Daniel Defoe properly, less attention has been paid to the process of attribution itself and the context in which these attributions were made. This essay examines the various means through which Francis Noble and his brother John represented the authorial relationship between Defoe, Roxana, and Moll Flanders between 1775 and 1787 and analyzes these attributions within the larger discourses surrounding the Nobles' circulating libraries. "Attribution and Repetition" provides an account of attribution as a slow and repetitive process rather than a singular moment or act.

              ECL_2_1

              A. Lincoln. War and the Culture of Politeness: The Case of The Tatler and The Spectator  (p. 60)

              Notes: 70

              During the last decades of the seventeenth century and the first decades of the eighteenth, transformations in the financing and organization of the military allowed England, and then Britain, to wage war abroad on an unprecedented scale. At the same time, some writers were trying to imagine and promote an idea of civil society governed by norms of a benevolent "politeness." One function of the new culture of politeness was to reconcile readers to the massive increase in military activity. This essay will explore the process of reconciliation in the two most influential periodicals of the early eighteenth century, The Tatler and The Spectator, which are sometimes credited with a key role in the development of polite standards of taste in eighteenth-century Britain.

              B.C. McInelly. Raising the Roof: Hymn Singing, the Anti-Methodist Response, and Early Methodist Religiosity (p. 80)

              Notes: 67

              This paper explores some of the ways hymns informed the Methodist revival. I argue that the hymns can be better understood as the site of a complex negotiation between John and Charles Wesley and their followers, as the brothers attempted to steer the movement away from charges of religious enthusiasm. The emotional power the hymns unleashed required various kinds of constraint so that hymn singing fed the intense feelings of conversion in controlled ways while providing the feelings with content. The hymns achieved this, in part, by creating for singers an experience of identification (as described by Kenneth Burke); that is, singers identified with the lyrical and rhythmic qualities of the hymns, thereby confirming spiritual impulses they felt but could not always express. In addition, by questioning the rationality of mainstream Enlightenment religion, the hymns functioned, though not always successfully, to challenge the grounds on which the anti-Methodists mounted their campaign against Methodism. Like other features of the revival, such as open-air preaching and lay ministry, hymn singing generated controversy; paradoxically, this controversy provided much of the energy that ultimately sustained the Methodist movement and helped to define the faith of individual Methodists.

              C. Wesley (1707-1788)

              B.M. Benedict. Collecting Trouble: Sir Hans Sloane's Literary Reputation in Eighteenth-Century Britain (p. 111)

              Notes: 71

              This article argues that the shifts in the reputation of Sir Hans Sloane, the foremost British collector of the eighteenth century, reflect the changing reputation of collecting itself from the Restoration to the Regency. By examining the literary representations of Sloane in genres ranging from poetry to memoirs, it traces Sloane's reputation in literary culture from that of a model physician and benefactor, to a charlatan, to a toyman, and finally, to an entrepreneur. These shifts reflect the challenges that collecting presented to culture: on the one hand, it threatened conventional valuations, and on the other, offered rich opportunities both for both self-advancement and the advancement of learning. Writers show that Sloane's activities recast the natural world as a storehouse stuffed with collectibles and collecting as an ambiguous but national practice of imperialistic acquisition. At the same time, they find in Sloane and the fashion for collecting several dangers: it reflected the increasing power of objects to oust abstract concepts as the subjects of literary description, presented new modes of self-definition and sociability, and, above all, led to a transition from an idea of nature as full of wonders to one in which nature is a treasure-house of loot and knowledge. Whereas the Restoration had embraced the new definition of a scholar-collector as a gentleman who contributed to the public good, by the midcentury, collectors seemed self-absorbed and deluded. Yet, by the end of the century, collecting was considered laudable self-advancement. Things had changed, so that on 15 January 1759, when the British Museum opened for "study and public inspection," Sloane, formerly a charlatan and a toyman, stood as the noble exemplar of the collector and the father of a new British identity.

              Sir Hans Sloane (1660-1753)

              Review Essays:

              D. Mazalla. Cynics and Skeptics (p. 143)

              Notes: 13

              R.R. Boyson. The Demanding Pleasures of Coupling  (p. 154)

              =========================




                                

                                

            • Prof. B.V. Toshev
              Just Received (subscription): EIGHTEENTH CENTURY LIFE ISSN 0098-2601 (Duke University Press) Editor: C.D. Reverand II [Cover] All articles from 2000 to today
              Message 6 of 7 , Sep 22, 2012
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                Just Received (subscription):

                EIGHTEENTH CENTURY LIFE ISSN 0098-2601 (Duke University Press)

                Editor: C.D. Reverand II

                Cover

                All articles from 2000 to today are available.

                ======================

                ToC: Eighteenth Century Life, Volume 36, Number 3,Fall 2012

                =======================

                L. Bertelsen. Richmond's Rhetoric and Chatham's Collapse: A Media History (p. 1)

                Notes: 45

                John Singleton Copley's The Death of the Earl of Chatham has been discussed extensively by art historians, but little critical attention has been paid to written accounts of the debate between the Duke of Richmond and the Earl of Chatham nor the process by which they evolved into the strikingly uniform descriptions found in biographies of Chatham and in parliamentary histories both contemporary and modern. A letter from Walker King to Richard Burke, Jr., written within hours of the event, offers a compelling new perspective on what may have been said on the floor of Lords on 7 April 1778 and raises questions about the role of the London newspapers and journals in not only reporting parliamentary debates but also editorially controlling how they passed into history. The mysterious disappearance of inflammatory rhetoric found in more immediate newspaper reports suggests particular political reasons for such omissions and subsequent adjustments to the historical and visual record. Such findings in turn posit the desirability of an enhanced method for reconstructing parliamentary debates based on the accessibility of the digital Burney newspaper collection.

                G. Dyer. The Arrest of Caleb Williams: Unnatural Crime, Constructive Violence, and Overwhelming Terror in Late Eighteenth-Century England (p. 31)

                Notes: 56

                In the later eighteenth century, the twelve justices of the supreme English common law courts ruled repeatedly that blackmailing a man by threatening to accuse him of sodomitical practices constituted the capital offense of robbery; the judges focused on the overwhelming terror they claimed was unique to this threat. This legal doctrine is a covert presence in William Godwin's novel Caleb Williams (1794). Ferdinando Falkland, fearing that his secret is about to be revealed by Caleb, accuses him of having "robbed" him, and even though Falkland's secret is literally murder, the mutual persecution and mutual terrorizing that ensue evoke the relation between sodomy and blackmail.

                W. Godwin (1756-1836)

                P. Bullard. Digital Editing and the Eighteenth-Century Text: Works, Archives, and Miscellanies (p. 57)

                Notes: 62

                This article develops recent work by literary historians on miscellany publication, and on the printed miscellanies that were so important and popular for the early eighteenth-century book trade. It offers a history of the form, illustrated by comments made by the Duke of Buckingham, Francis Osborne, Sir William Temple, Charles de Sainte-Évremond, John Locke, John Wilson, the Earl of Shaftesbury, Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope, and John Gay. It examines examples of miscellanies produced by John Dryden and his publisher Jacob Tonson, by John Dennis and Charles Gildon, and by Pope and Swift. Previous commentators have argued that miscellanies were the product of book-trade contingency—publishers simply bundled whatever fugitive poetry they happened to have to hand. This article argues that miscellanies were in fact well-theorized vehicles for authorial and editorial intention. Multiauthor miscellanies often represented complicated patterns of social and cultural allegiance. Miscellaneity had distinct formal meaning. This essay proposes that editors and designers of electronic editions should consider "digital miscellaneity" as an eligible model for future editions of eighteenth-century texts.

                Sir William Temple (1628-1699)

                C. de Sainte-Evremond (1613-1703)

                J. Locke (1632-1704)

                J. Swift (1667-1745)

                J. Gay (1685-1732)

                J. Dryden (1631-1700)

                J. Tonson (1655-1736)

                Review Essays (p. 81): 8 reviews

                ===========================



              • Borislav Toshev
                EIGHTEENTH CENTURY LIFE, Volume 37, Number 3, 2014 All articles from the issue are avaible (personal subscription)
                Message 7 of 7 , Apr 15 9:44 AM
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                  EIGHTEENTH CENTURY LIFE, Volume 37, Number 3, 2014


                  All articles from the issue are avaible (personal subscription)
                  Do not hesitate to send me a message if you need more information about the articles listed in this issue.

                  ==================
                  Some pictures in connection with this issue:

                  John Dryden (1631-1700)

                  ]\
                  Thomas Blacklock (1721-1791)

                  Eliza Haywood (1693-1756)

                  Jonathan Swift (1667-1745)

                  Professor B.V. Toshev,
                  University of Sofia,
                  1 James Bourchier Blvd.
                  1164 Sofia, BULGARIA
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