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ToC: NEW ENGLAND QUARTERLY

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  • Prof. B.V. Toshev
    Just Received (subscription): THE NEW ENGLAND QUARTERLY ISSN 1937-2213 (MIT Press) [The New England Quarterly] For 80 years, The New England Quarterly has
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 1, 2012
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      Just Received (subscription):

      THE NEW ENGLAND QUARTERLY ISSN 1937-2213 (MIT Press)

      The New England Quarterly

      For 80 years, The New England Quarterly has published the best that has been written on New England's cultural, political, social, and literary history. Contributions cover a range of time periods, from before European colonization to the present, and any subject germane to New England's history. In addition to major essays, features include memoranda and edited documents, reconsiderations of traditional texts and interpretations, essay reviews, and book reviews.

      Editor: L.S. Rhoads

      Availability: All articles from 1928 to today are avaible.

      ===========================

      ToC: New England QuarterlyVolume 85, Number 1, March 2012

      =============================

      E. Carton. American Scholars: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Joseph Smith, John Brown, and the Springs of Intellectual Schism (p. 5)

      Notes: 71

      The essay examines Ralph Waldo Emerson, Joseph Smith, and John Brown as shapers and representatives of America's common, though riven, culture of intellectual life–charismatic thinkers and actors who spoke to their society's need for general explanatory ideas in idioms that continue to bespeak our nation's deepest commonalities and deepest fractures.

      R.W. Emerson (1803-1882)

      J. Smith (1805-1844)

      J. Brown (1800-1859)


      J.R. Jeffrey. The Liberty Women of Boston: Evangelicalism and Antislavery Politics (p. 38)

      Notes: 78

      When the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society collapsed in 1841, evangelical women established the Massachusetts Female Emancipation Society. Although scholars have suggested that their conservatism soon caused MFES women to abandon abolitionism, an examination of non-Garrisonian newspapers reveals not only their undiminished commitment to moral suasion but their enthusiastic embrace of the Liberty Party and political action.

      M.B. Fuhrer. The Revolutionary Worlds of Lexington and Concord Compared (p. 78)

      Notes: 86

      Since 19 April 1775, Lexington and Concord have been fused in Americans' cultural memory. Yet Lexington was no Concord. The towns' social, demographic, political, religious, and ideological differences shed light on their radically different responses to imperial crises as well as on the shared motivations that prompted both—ultimately—to take up arms.

      W.T. La Moy. Two Documents Detailing the Oneida Community's Practice of Complex Marriage (p. 119)

      Notes: 9

      In 1915, Dr. George E. Cragin delivered a candid (and heretofore unpublished) lecture to the Oneida Medical Club on male continence, or coitus reservatus, a practice supporting the Oneida Community's concept of complex marriage, or free love. A portion of a published article to which Cragin alludes, containing an account by one disaffected woman member, is offered in counterpoint.

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      A.D. Moulton. "Times Change": Frank J. Webb Addresses Robert Morris on the Promise of Reconstruction (p. 137)

      Notes: 24

      In 1869, African American author Frank J. Webb returned to Washington, D.C., to become a "Carpetbagger" in the Reconstruction South. In a letter to black Bostonian Robert Morris, Webb illustrated the richness of antebellum African American reform networks and portrayed one man's boundless optimism for race relations in postbellum America.

      P. Lewis. Longfellow's Serenity and Poe's Prediction: An Antebellum Turning Point (p. 144)

      Notes: 39

      In 1839, Edgar Allan Poe insisted that, though Henry Wadsworth Longfellow had "high qualities," his reputation would not survive into the future. Poe's seemingly prescient prediction reveals a good deal about Longfellow's practice as a poet as well as Poe's contribution to the development of both modernism and popular culture.

      E.A. Poe (1809-1849)

      W.M. Fowler Jr., L.S. Rhoads. Oscar Handlin, 1915–2011 (p. 159)

      D. Korzenik. Essay Review: Portrait of the Artist as an American? (p. 161)

      Notes: 9

      The Bennington Museum's 2011 exhibition "Grandma Moses and the Primitive Tradition" invited viewers to reassess the twentieth-century work and reception of painter Anna Mary Robertson Moses. The meteoric rise of her art, marketed as "primitive," coincided with certain refugee German art dealers' quest to offer an American alternative to the war-contaminated wares of Europe.

      A.M.R. Moses (1860-1961)

      Book Reviews (p. 168): 12 reviews (Building Their Own Waldos: Emerson's First Biographers and the Politics of Life-Writing in the Gilded Age; Shakers, Mormons, and Religious Worlds: Conflicting Visions, Contested Boundaries; The Man with the Branded Hand: The Life of Jonathan Walker, Abolitionist; The Politics of Anxiety in Nineteenth-Century American Literature; Lucretia Mott's Heresy: Abolition and Women's Rights in Nineteenth-Century America; Making Slavery History: Abolitionism and the Politics of Memory in Massachusetts; New Essays on Phillis Wheatley; Race and Redemption in Puritan New England; Midnight Ride, Industrial Dawn: Paul Revere and the Growth of American Enterprise; The Forgotten Founding Father: Noah Webster's Obsession and the Creation of an American Culture; Adopting America: Childhood, Kinship, and National Identity in Literature; Women Writers of the American West, 1833–1927).

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      THE BELOGRADCHIK SOCIETY FOR LOCAL HISTORY AND FOLK STUDIES
      IN PURSUIT OF EXCELLENCE IN LOCAL HISTORY: COLLECTING, PRESERVING, DISSEMINATING
      ========================



    • Prof. B.V. Toshev
      Just Received (subscription): THE NEW ENGLAND QUARTERLY ISSN 1937-2213 (MIT Press) [The New England Quarterly] For 80 years, The New England Quarterly has
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 1, 2012
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        Just Received (subscription):

        THE NEW ENGLAND QUARTERLY ISSN 1937-2213 (MIT Press)

        The New England Quarterly

        For 80 years, The New England Quarterly has published the best that has been written on New England's cultural, political, social, and literary history. Contributions cover a range of time periods, from before European colonization to the present, and any subject germane to New England's history. In addition to major essays, features include memoranda and edited documents, reconsiderations of traditional texts and interpretations, essay reviews, and book reviews.

        Editor: L.S. Rhoads

        Availability: All articles from 1928 to today are avaible.

        ===========================

        ToC: New England Quarterly, Volume 85, Number 2, June 2012

        =============================

        C.N. Phillips. Cotton Mather Brings Isaac Watts's Hymns to America; or, How to Perform a Hymn without Singing It (p. 203)

        Notes: 42

        This essay reconstructs Cotton Mather's efforts to introduce Isaac Watts's hymns into New England print culture using sermon pamphlets and family prayer guides. These forms framed hymns as read rather than sung texts, but they also enabled the performance of hymns as expressions of personal faith during the Great Awakening.

        C. Mather (1663-1728)

        I. Watts (1674-1748)

        S.J.J. Pitt. Cotton Mather and Boston's "Seafaring Tribe" (p. 222)

        Notes: 94

        This essay tells the compelling story of Cotton Mather's struggle to ride the stormy waves of colonial Boston's rise as an Atlantic port by focusing his ministerial and intellectual energies on a growing and volatile seafaring population. Seafarers' reactions to his efforts produced a complex, at times paradoxical, relationship.

        J. Ronan. "Young Goodman Brown" and the Mathers (p. 253)

        Notes: 60

        "`Young Goodman Brown' and the Mathers" contends that Hawthorne's famous tale is an allegorical representation of Increase and Cotton Mather's agency in bringing about the Salem witch trials through their demonological publications.

        K. Gerbner. Beyond the "Halfway Covenant": Church Membership, Extended Baptism, and Outreach in Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1656–1667 (p. 281)

        Notes: 48

        Jonathan Mitchel, minister of the Cambridge Church (1656–67), used the extension and liberalization of baptism in the 1650s and 60s–later denigrated as the halfway covenant–to bring the unchurched and their children into fellowship, thus indicating a strategy of reaching out to the community, not of appeasing a lapsing or fastidious second generation.

        A. Henton. "Once Masculines … Now Feminines Awhile": Gendered Imagery and the Significance of Anne Bradstreet's The Tenth Muse (p. 302)

        Notes: 37

        Anne Bradstreet's early poems showcase a poet working within established tropes and traditions to destabilize gender frameworks and posit a poetic landscape dominated by feminine symbols. Rather than creating an alternative to a Puritan identity, Bradstreet creates an alternative Puritan identity, one that lays the groundwork for numerous American women writers.

        A. Bradstreet (1612-1672)

        C. Sederholm. The Trouble with Grace: Reading Jonathan Edwards'sFaithful Narrative (p. 326)

        Notes: 18

        Critics have long noted but never adequately explained why Jonathan Edwards deliberately reordered the Northampton revival's chronology in his Faithful Narrative. This essay argues that by declaring that Joseph Hawley's suicide signified the withdrawal of God's Spirit, Edwards sought to protect his community from the social, cultural, and theological ramifications of that self-murder.

        J. Edwards (1703-1758)

        Book Reviews (p. 355): 10 reviews (Cotton Mather, Biblia Americana, Volume 1: Genesis; Hannah Mather Crocker: Reminiscences and Traditions of Boston; The Politics of Fashion in Eighteenth-Century America; Miraculous Plagues: An Epidemiology of Early New England Narrative; A Reforming People: Puritanism and the Transformation of Public Life in New England; Denman Ross and American Design Theory; Charlotte Perkins Gilman: New Texts, New Contexts; Clearing the Coastline: The Nineteenth-Century Ecological and Cultural Transformation of Cape Cod; Lobster: A Global History; A Landscape History of New England).

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      • Prof. B.V. Toshev
        Just Received (subscription): THE NEW ENGLAND QUARTERLY ISSN 1937-2213 (MIT Press) [The New England Quarterly] For 80 years, The New England Quarterly has
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 10, 2012
        • 0 Attachment

          Just Received (subscription):

          THE NEW ENGLAND QUARTERLY ISSN 1937-2213 (MIT Press)

          The New England Quarterly

          For 80 years, The New England Quarterly has published the best that has been written on New England's cultural, political, social, and literary history. Contributions cover a range of time periods, from before European colonization to the present, and any subject germane to New England's history. In addition to major essays, features include memoranda and edited documents, reconsiderations of traditional texts and interpretations, essay reviews, and book reviews.

          Editor: L.S. Rhoads

          Availability: All articles from 1928 to today are avaible.

          ===========================

          ToC: New England Quarterly, Volume 85, Number 3, September 2012

          =============================

          B.D. Carroll. “Savages” in the Service of Empire: Native American Soldiers in Gorham's Rangers, 1744â€"1762 (p. 383)

          Notes: 63

          Gorham's Rangers, initially an all-Indian ranger company, was instrumental in Britain's conquest of Nova Scotia (Acadia) during the eighteenth century. In the process of uncovering that story, the essay assesses New England Indians’ role in shaping colonial frontier warfare as well as the impact of military service on Native American communities.

          T.C. Jones. “Displaying the Ensigns of Harmony”: The French Army in Newport, Rhode Island, 1780â€"1781  (p. 430)

          Notes: 77

          In June 1780, a French Catholic army landed in Newport, Rhode Island. Given British Americans’ longstanding animosities toward French Canada and initial confusions about the allied soldiers’ identity, cross-cultural accord had to be carefully established. The present essay illuminates how this unprecedented, seemingly unlikely Revolutionary alliance played out in practice.

          N. Meyer. “One Language in Prayer”: Evangelicalism, Anti-Catholicism, and Harriet Beecher Stowe's The Minister's Wooing (p. 468)

          Notes: 35

          The author explores antebellum America's anti-Catholic imagination, how it informed the Beecher family, and how Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel The Minister's Wooing responded to that ethos. Rejecting her family's and her nation's anti-Catholicism, Stowe portrays an ideal, sympathetic community of Catholic and Protestant women in the New England home.

          H.B. Stowe (1811-1896)

          R.S. Christen. John Jenkins and The Art of Writing: Handwriting and Identity in the Early American Republic (p. 491)

          Notes: 81

          Author of the first truly American handwriting book (1791), John Jenkins introduced an innovative pedagogy that, he promised, would make elegant handwriting “plain and easy” for all. Fusing old with new, he argued that synthesisâ€"gentility with opportunity, aesthetics with utility, hand with mindâ€"would come to define American identity in the early republic.

          S. VanZanten. “Bridges Often Go”: Emily Dickinson's Bridge Poems  (p. 526)

          Notes: 41

          Emily Dickinson's references to the nineteenth-century science of bridge building culminate in two major bridge poems that apply technical knowledge to transcendent concepts to produce powerful statements of faith. Transforming the technological sublime into the religious sublime, Dickinson captures the mystery of the transition from life to death.

          E. Dickinsson (1830-1886)

          Book Reviews (p. 543): 17 reviews (Clover Adams: A Gilded and Heartbreaking Life; American Orient: Imagining the East from the Colonial Era through the Twentieth Century; Unbecoming British: How Revolutionary America Became a Postcolonial Nation; The Collected Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson, vol. 9: Poems, A Variorum Edition; Building Culture: Studies in the Intellectual History of Industrializing America, 1867â€"1910; Mightier Than the Sword: “Uncle Tom's Cabin” and the Battle for America; Slavery and Sin: The Fight against Slavery and the Rise of Liberal Protestantism; Polemical Pain: Slavery, Cruelty, and the Rise of Humanitarianism; Railroaded: The Transcontinentals and the Making of Modern America; New England to Gold Rush California: The Journal of Alfred and Chastina W. Rix, 1849â€"1854; Ethan Allen: His Life and Times; Death of an Empire: The Rise and Murderous Fall of Salem, America's Richest City; Surveyors of Empire: Samuel Holland, J. F. W. Des Barres, and the Making of “The Atlantic Neptune.” ; A Professor, a President, and a Meteor: The Birth of American Science; The Science of the Soul in Colonial New England; Martyrs’ Mirror: Persecution and Holiness in Early New England; The Grand Chorus of Complaint: Authors and the Business Ethics of American Publishing).

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