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ToC: PAST & PRESENT

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  • Prof. B.V. Toshev
    Just Received (Subscription): PAST & PRESENT ISSN 0031-2746 (Oxford University Press) Founded in 1952, Past & Present is widely acknowledged to be the
    Message 1 of 12 , Oct 4, 2011
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      Just Received (Subscription):

      PAST & PRESENT ISSN 0031-2746 (Oxford University Press)

      Founded in 1952, Past & Present is widely acknowledged to be the liveliest and most stimulating historical journal in the English-speaking world. The journal offers:

      • A wide variety of scholarly and original articles on historical, social and cultural change in all parts of the world.
      • Four issues a year, each containing five or six major articles plus occasional debates and review essays.
      • Challenging work by young historians as well as seminal articles by internationally regarded scholars.
      • A range of articles that appeal to specialists and non-specialists, and communicate the results of the most recent historical research in a readable and lively form.
      • A forum for debate, encouraging productive controversy.
      • The examination of particular problems and periods as well as wider issues of historical change.
      ========
      Editors: Lynda Poper, Steve Smith
      http://past.oxfordjournals.org/content/212/1.cover.gif
      Impact Factor, IF(2010)=0.253
      =========
      Availability: All articles from 1996 to today
      ===================
      ToC: Past & Present, Volume 212, Issue 1, August 2011
      ===================
      P. Crooks. State of the Union: Perspectives on English Imperialism in the Late Middle Ages (p. 3)
      Notes: 212;

      R. Hutton. Witch-Hunting in Celtic Societies  (p. 43)
      Notes: 75;

      D. Cressy. Saltpetre, State Security and Vexation in Early Modern England  (p. 73)
      Notes: 141;

      G.D.S. Sood. Circulation and Exchange in Islamicate Eurasia: A Regional Approach to the Early Modern World  (p. 113)
      Notes: 160

      http://past.oxfordjournals.org/content/212/1/113/F1.medium.gif

      A. Sartori. A Liberal Discourse of Custom in Colonial Bengal  (p. 163)
      Notes: 120;

      M. Crook, T. Crook. Reforming Voting Practices in a Global Age: The Making and Remaking of the Modern Secret Ballot in Britain, France and the United States, c.1600–c.1950  (p. 199)
      Notes: 125;

      K.K. Patel. The Paradox of Planning: German Agricultural Policy in a European Perspective, 1920s to 1970s (p. 239)
      Notes: 74.
      ==================
    • Prof. B.V. Toshev
      Just Received (Subscription): PAST & PRESENT ISSN 0031-2746 (Oxford University Press) [http://past.oxfordjournals.org/content/212/1.cover.gif] Editors: Lynda
      Message 2 of 12 , Dec 17, 2011
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        PAST & PRESENT ISSN 0031-2746 (Oxford University Press)
        http://past.oxfordjournals.org/content/212/1.cover.gif

        Editors: Lynda Poper, Steve Smith

        Smith

        Impact Factor, IF(2010)=0.253
        =========
        Availability: All articles from 1996 to today
        ===================
        ToC: Past & Present, Volume 213, Issue 1, November 2011
        ===================
        N. Nowakowska. From Strassburg to Trent: Bishops, Printing and Liturgical Reform in the Fifteenth Century (p. 3)
        Notes: 79

        In 1879, the director of the Royal Library in Stockholm, Gustaf Klemming, published a major study of medieval Swedish liturgy into which, somewhat unconventionally, he incorporated single leaves of rare incunabula....


        G. Kleming (1859-1922)

        M. Knights. John Locke and Post-Revolutionary Politics: Electoral Reform and the Franchise (p. 41)
        Notes: 157

        Our perception of John Locke's ideas and significance has undergone profound change in the last forty years....

        2

        J. Locke (1632-1704)

        C. Ebert. Early Modern Atlantic Trade and the Development of Maritime Insurance to 1630 (p. 87)
        Notes: 68

        During an age when Atlantic shipping was beset by many hazards, the voyage of de Hoope, which left Amsterdam in September 1616 to trade in Portugal and Brazil, appears to have been particularly unlucky....

        T. Roy. Where is Bengal? Situating an Indian Region in the Early Modern World Economy (p. 115)
        Notes: 89

        Recent studies on the economic and social history of Bengal from the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries suggest that the region experienced an economic boom in this time span, owing to expansion in the agrarian frontier, a flourishing textile industry, urbanization, trade with the western Gangetic plains, and Indo-European maritime trade....

        F. Bensimon. British Workers in France, 1815–1848 (p. 147)
        Notes: 150

        In spite of the growing interest in `connected histories', exchanges between France and its neighbours and between Britain and western Europe are seldom explored at an `intermediary' level — between the local level of town, county, regional or national history, and the universal level of global or world history...



        D. Motadel. Qajar Shahs in Imperial Germany (p. 191)
        Notes: 165

        At six o'clock on the evening of 31 May 1873, Shah Nasir al-Din of Persia, fourth king of the Qajar dynasty, and his entourage arrived at Potsdam Station in Berlin, where they were greeted by the German Emperor Wilhelm I, Crown Prince Friedrich, Chancellor Bismarck and Field Marshal Moltke....

        Shah Nasir al-Din of Persia (1831-1896)

        Wilhelm I (1797-1888)

        O. von Bismark (1815-1898)

        Field Marshal H. von Moltke (1800-1891)








        P.S. de Ganon. Down the Rabbit Hole: A Study in the Political Economy of Modern Japan (p. 237)
        Notes: 118

        Japan's first government of the modern period promoted what was, for Japan, a radical idea: the market pursuit of private gain bolstered by economic laissez-faire....




        L.K. Little. Plague Historians in Lab Coats (p. 267)
        Notes: 67

        In 1998 a team of French scientists published a study demonstrating that the epidemic of infectious disease that struck Marseille in 1720–2, widely held at the time and ever since to be plague, was indeed plague...

      • Prof. B.V. Toshev
        THE BELOGRADCHIK SOCIETY FOR LOCAL HISTORY AND FOLK STUDIES (apply for a free membership) IN PURSUIT OF EXCELLENCE IN LOCAL HISTORY COLLECTING, PRESERVING,
        Message 3 of 12 , Mar 17, 2012
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          THE BELOGRADCHIK SOCIETY FOR LOCAL HISTORY AND FOLK STUDIES
          (apply for a free membership)


          IN PURSUIT OF EXCELLENCE IN LOCAL HISTORY
          COLLECTING, PRESERVING, DISSEMINATING

          No. 190, 17 March 2012

          ===================================

          Just Received (Subscription):

          PAST & PRESENT ISSN 0031-2746 (Oxford University Press)
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          Editors: Lynda Poper, Steve Smith

          Smith

          Impact Factor, IF(2010)=0.253
          =========
          Availability: All articles from 1996 to today
          ===================
          ToC: Past & Present, Volume 214, Issue 1, February 2012
          ===================
          T.B. Lambert. Theft, Homicide and Crime in Late Anglo-Saxon Law (p. 3)
          Notes: 117
           
          It is a startling but infrequently remarked upon fact that for five centuries English law, which prescribed the sternest penalties for theft, contained only a relatively minor royal fine for homicide. Whereas the first clear statement that the death penalty applied to thieves is found in the late seventh-century West Saxon laws of Ine, we have no equivalent statement with respect to homicide before the text known as Glanvill, composed in the late 1180s. This apparent disparity between the treatment of homicide and theft throughout the Anglo-Saxon period, and indeed well into the twelfth century, was not something that unduly troubled scholars of a century ago — F. W. Maitland, for one, was content simply to accept the two offences' differing treatments at face value — but the modern generation of legal historians has been rather more sceptical. Perhaps in part because of the recent (anthropologically influenced) trend to view law codes and other normative sources with suspicion, and to favour instead the evidence of real-life cases, they have felt able to disregard the disparity in the laws and to present a picture of broad continuity in substantive criminal law reaching back from the time of Glanvill well into the late Anglo-Saxon period. Although the scholarly basis for the idea is in fact rather minimal — the point has only ever been argued explicitly in an extended footnote by Naomi Hurnard in 1949 and from another angle by Patrick Wormald in an article first published in 1997 — it is now commonly assumed that homicide was prohibited in a way similar to theft for some time before the Norman Conquest. Modern accounts of the development of the Common Law now tend to emphasize the importance of procedural innovations, mostly introduced in some form under the …
           
          F. W. Maitland (1850-1906)
           
          J. Dumolyn, J.  Haemers. `A Bad Chicken was Brooding': Subversive Speech in Late Medieval Flanders (p. 45)
          Notes: 145
           
          In March and April 1477, the guilds of Ypres were in open revolt. They took advantage of the defeat and death at Nancy of Charles the Bold, count of Flanders and duke of Burgundy, to start a rebellion against the ruling patrician class and demand the restitution of privileges that had been abolished in earlier decades. Burgundian power was weak as the French king attacked its territory, and the new countess of Flanders, Charles's daughter Mary of Burgundy, did not have the means to suppress revolts in Ghent, Bruges, Ypres and other cities and towns in the Low Countries. In Ypres, guild leaders took control of the urban government and several of the privileges favourable to the craft guilds were restored. Once the Burgundian court had recovered and Mary of Burgundy had married Maximilian, the Habsburg archduke of Austria, the central power retaliated. In a joint action with the urban elite of Ypres in the autumn of 1477, the ruling dynasty started an in-depth investigation into the circumstances of the revolt's outbreak in order to punish its leaders. The prosecutor wanted to know not only what exactly had happened, but also what the rebels had said to each other before the rebellion had started. At some point, one Jan Wouterman, a draper, confessed that he had overheard two other men, Ghislain and Maylin Everaert, in conversation at the Ypres Corn Market. They had said they knew where `a bad chicken was brooding' (`een quaet kiekin broedde'). Wouterman was referring to some apprentice weavers who had secretly assembled in an inn at the market square around three tables, declaring that they would not take up work again until they had regained the old privileges.
           
          P. Marshall. The Naming of Protestant England (p. 87)
          Notes: 170
           
          The writer Daniel Defoe, surveying two centuries during which his country had travelled `from the Romish Religion to Reform'd, from Reform'd back again toRomish, and then to Reform'd again', could note with satisfaction that `the Name of Protestant is now the common Title of an Englishman'. How, and how quickly, England became Protestant, and English people became Protestants, in the course of the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries is a long-standing and contentious historical question. In the late 1970s, Britain's leading Tudor historian, G. R. Elton, could confidently assert that by the end of the reign of Edward VI `England was almost certainly nearer to being a Protestant country than to anything else'. But it was already becoming clear that what Patrick Collinson has christened `the birthpangs of Protestant England' were a more protracted and painful process. Revisionist scholarship of the 1980s and 1990s stressed the slow and uncertain pace of reform, and the difficulty in securing conversions, with Christopher Haigh proposing, in an intriguing formulation, that even by the middle of Elizabeth's reign, the Reformation had succeeded in creating `a Protestant nation, but not a nation of Protestants'. More recently, attention has shifted from measuring patterns of conversion to investigating political accommodations and negotiations on the part of rulers and ruled. Other studies of a broadly `post-revisionist' character draw attention to transitions and continuities in religious culture across the putative Reformation divide. The `Protestantism' of the English Church and its people is assumed, but the degree to which common understandings of it were shared by clergy and laity, and across social classes, remains deeply problematic.
           
          D. Defoe (1659-1731)
           
          D. Stolzenberg. John Spencer and the Perils of Sacred Philology (p. 129)
          Notes: 96
           
          In 1650 the Bible's status as infallible revelation — unique guide to salvation and universal history of mankind's origins — appeared secure to most educated Europeans. True, more than a century of confessional struggle and theological debate had exposed scripture to unprecedented scrutiny and proliferating interpretations. Yet, amid the wrangling, scarcely any author questioned its divine authorship or historical reliability. Meanwhile, biblical scholars were at work shoring up the foundations of scriptural authority with the tools of Renaissance philology. But appearances were deceptive. The following decades witnessed scandalous publications by Thomas Hobbes, Isaac La Peyrere and Baruch Spinoza, which openly challenged established assumptions about the Bible, setting the stage for Enlightenment polemicists such as John Toland and Voltaire. Historical scholarship was a major arena for these debates, with orthodoxy challenged, not only by evidence extending the age of the world beyond the confines of biblical chronology, but also by arguments displacing the Hebrew nation from its privileged historical role. Enlightenment critics of Judaeo-Christian revelation, from Toland at the beginning of the eighteenth century to Friedrich Schiller at the end, turned sacred history on its head by arguing that, long before the Jews, the ancient Egyptians possessed a monotheistic religion, which Moses, raised in their culture, plagiarized.
           
          T. Hobbes (1588-1679)
           
          B. de Spinoza (1632-1677)
           
          K. Harvey. Ritual Encounters: Punch Parties and Masculinity in the Eighteenth Century (p. 165)
          Notes: 128
           
          Consider the two eighteenth-century bowls illustrated in Plates 1–4 (overleaf). The exterior of the first, a blue and white tin-glazed earthenware bowl made by Lawrence Harrison in Liverpool in 1748, is hand-painted with a vigorous and conventional hunting scene. More hidden from view on the interior is the image within the circular frame, which depicts a group of men drinking while huddled tightly around a table. On the second, a creamware bowl from c.1760, the exterior features bold and brightly painted exotic birds; but, again, the contrasting image cradled in its interior depicts a similar crowded scene (in reverse) of men drinking, albeit with a different decorative edging and colour palette. Within both bowls, liquid would have given these groups a rocking motion that would nicely mimic but also exaggerate the impression of drunken unsteadiness portrayed in the image itself. This image, of course, is a copy of William Hogarth's A Midnight Modern Conversation (painting c.1732; print 1733), which lifts the curtain on men at a punch party in a coffee-house (see Plate 5). Scholars have seen the image not only as a witty parody of the conversation piece genre and as a self-conscious representation of the degeneration of more polite gatherings in some of Hogarth's other work, but also as a criticism of the event it portrays: nothing less than a `sordid binge'. Yet this copy of the image appears on the interior of precisely the object — the punch bowl — that is central to the occasion that Hogarth depicts. His apparent critique of a punch party was itself situated at such a gathering, in the form of the decoration on the punch bowl. We are faced with a kaleidoscopic visual and material culture in which images of gatherings not only represent such …
           
          1.
           
          2.
           
          4.
           
          5.
           
          8.
           
          11.
           
           
          T. Platt. Container Transport: From Skin Bags to Iron Flasks. Changing Technologies of Quicksilver Packaging between Almadén and America, 1788–1848 (p. 205)
          Notes: 88
           
          In 1835 Nathan Mayer Rothschild contracted with the Spanish Crown to market the production of the great Spanish quicksilver mine at Almaden. This contract established an immensely lucrative monopoly which, with few interruptions, the Rothschilds would hold until 1921. It gave them control of a key resource for gold and silver production required by miners and refiners all over the world. Demand seemed assured for the foreseeable future, as long as precious metals retained a strategic role in finance and trade. The theme of this article is the change in the means of packaging and transporting this liquid metal introduced under Bourbon Spain as part of the Hispanic scientific, technological and organizational infrastructure which made possible Rothschild's quicksilver cartel.
           
           
           
        • Prof. B.V. Toshev
          Just Received: PAST & PRESENT: Supplement 7 Murdock, G., Roberts, P. & Spicer, A. (Eds.). Ritual and Violence: Natalie Zemon Davis and Early Modern France.
          Message 4 of 12 , Apr 24, 2012
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            Just Received:

            PAST & PRESENT: Supplement 7

            Murdock, G., Roberts, P. & Spicer, A. (Eds.). Ritual and Violence: Natalie Zemon Davis and Early Modern France. Oxford: Oxford University Press ISBN 978-0-19-965496-3

            http://past.oxfordjournals.org/content/214/suppl_7.cover.gif
            ========================
            1. Introduction

            N.Z. Davis. Writing `The Rites of Violence' and Afterward (p. 5)
            Notes: 41

            2. Rites and Ritual

            B.B. Diefendorf. Rites of Repair: Restoring Community in the French Religious Wars (p. 30)
            Notes: 73

            M.P. Holt. Religious Violence in Sixteenth-Century France: Moving Beyond Pollution and Purification (p. 52)
            Notes: 64

            P. Roberts. Peace, Ritual, and Sexual Violence during the Religious Wars (p. 75)
            Notes: 102

            http://past.oxfordjournals.org/content/214/suppl_7/75/F1.large.jpg

            3. Rights and Agency

            A.A. Tulchin. Massacres during the French Wars of Religion (p. 100)
            Notes: 48

            S.  Carroll. The Rights of Violence (p. 127)
            Notes: 105

            http://past.oxfordjournals.org/content/214/suppl_7/127/F1.large.jpg

            http://past.oxfordjournals.org/content/214/suppl_7/127/F2.large.jpg
            P. Benedict
            . Prophets in Arms? Ministers in War, Ministers on War: France 1562–74 (p. 163)
            Notes: 79

            4. Rites and Representation

            S. Beam. Rites of Torture in Reformation Geneva (p. 197)
            Notes: 75

            D. Crouzet. From Christ-like King to Antichristian Tyrant: A First Crisis of the Monarchical Image at the Time of Francis I (p. 220)
            Notes: 37

            N. Cox
            , M. Greengrass. Painting Power: Antoine Caron's Massacres of the Triumvirate (p. 241)
            Notes: 91

            http://past.oxfordjournals.org/content/214/suppl_7/241/F1.large.jpg

            5. Afterword

            G. Murdock
            , A.  Spicer. Afterword (p. 275)
            Notes: 26

            List of Contributors (p. 287)

            Index (p. 289).
            ==========================
            DISCOVER BELOGRADCHIK:

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          • Prof. B.V. Toshev
            Just Received (subscription) PAST & PRESENT: A JOURNAL OF HISTORICAL STUDIES ISSN 1477-464x (Oxford University press) Editors: L. Roper, S.A. Smith Impact
            Message 5 of 12 , Jun 30, 2012
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              PAST & PRESENT: A JOURNAL OF HISTORICAL STUDIES ISSN 1477-464x (Oxford University press)

              Editors: L. Roper, S.A. Smith

              Impact Factor, IF(2011)=0,247

              Availability: all journals from 1996 to today.
              =====================
              ToC: Past & Present, Volume 215, May 2012
              =====================
              S. Richardson. Early Mesopotamia: The Presumptive State (p. 3)
              Notes: 146

              [O]ur earliest account of Mesopotamian state origins comes from the Sumerian King List, compiled around 2000 bc, which blandly confines its aetiology to: `When kingship descended from heaven, the kingship was in the city of Eridu'. The time to which it alludes, the Uruk period of more than a thousand years before, saw the simultaneous appearance in southern Mesopotamia of massive urbanism, writing technologies, and institutional political authority — the cultural assemblage of an early pristine state. ...

              Herodotius (484-425 BC)

              MAP 1

              Sumerian King List

              J.E. Shaw. Writing to the Prince: Supplications, Equity and Absolutism in Sixteenth-Century Tuscany (p. 51)
              Notes: 160

              [O]ne of the key problems for legal theorists of the late medieval and early modern periods was the relation of the universal to the particular. As Jean Bodin put it: `The infinite variety of circumstances do not permit of uniform treatment'. ...

              S. Sowerby. Forgetting the Repealers: Religious Toleration and Historical Amnesia in Later Stuart England (p. 85)
              Notes: 91

              [T]he erasure of the repealers from the historical record began with the failure to give the group a name. The men and women who rallied together for religious toleration in England in 1687 saw no need for a collective name. They presented themselves as a large group of concerned citizens. ...



              E. Griffin. A Conundrum Resolved? Rethinking Courtship, Marriage and Population Growth in Eighteenth-Century England (p. 125)
              Notes: 130

              [I]n this journal, more than thirty years ago, Tony Wrigley published the results of one of the most significant history projects of the twentieth century. In the mid 1960s, the newly formed Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure had begun work on a major programme of research into the history of population in England between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries, resulting in the publication of The Population History of England in 1981. ...

              S. Haselby. Sovereignty and Salvation on the Frontier of the Early American Republic (p. 165)
              Notes:

              [I]n Democracy in America, Alexis de Tocqueville claimed that a uniform democratic and republican ethos suffused American religion, vitally stabilizing the young republic's political society. `No religious doctrine' in the United States, he wrote, `displays the slightest hostility to democratic and republican institutions. ...

              E. Linstrum. The Politics of Psychology in the British Empire, 1898–1960 (p. 195)
              Notes: 124

              [T]he history of psychology in the British Empire can be told in many ways, but at its heart is a story of unfulfilled promise and frustrated expectations. In the midst of the Second World War, the head of the psychological laboratory at Cambridge University, Frederic Charles Bartlett, proposed that recruits for the colonial services should receive training in psychology to complement the usual course in language, law and anthropology. ...

              R. Stephens. Birthing Wealth? Motherhood and Poverty in East-Central Uganda, c.700–1900 (p. 235)
              Notes: 99

              [M]otherhood as a means of ensuring future status is a well-established concept in African history and has perhaps been best articulated by Claude Meillassoux in his study of pre-capitalist agrarian societies. ...

              E. Kissi. Paradoxes of American Development Diplomacy in the Early Cold War Period (p. 269)
              Notes: 65

              [T]his article examines the challenges, contradictions and ambiguous consequences of US agricultural development aid to Ethiopia in the late 1940s and throughout the 1950s. By focusing on US aid to its exceptional African ally (Ethiopia) in the nascent period of the Cold War, the article analyses the evolution of US cold war policy in Africa and the importance of Ethiopia in that process. ...

              H.S. Truman (1884-1972)
              ==================




            • Prof. B.V. Toshev
              Just Received (subscription) PAST & PRESENT: A JOURNAL OF HISTORICAL STUDIES ISSN 1477-464x (Oxford University press) Editors: L. Roper, S.A. Smith Impact
              Message 6 of 12 , Jul 24, 2012
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                PAST & PRESENT: A JOURNAL OF HISTORICAL STUDIES ISSN 1477-464x (Oxford University press)

                Editors: L. Roper, S.A. Smith

                Impact Factor, IF(2011)=0,247

                Availability: all journals from 1996 to today.
                =====================
                ToC: Past & Present, Volume 216, August 2012
                =====================
                J.L. Goldberg. Choosing and Enforcing Business Relationships in the Eleventh-Century Mediterranean: Reassessing the `Maghribi Traders' (p. 3)
                Notes: 127

                [A]round the year 1050, a wet bale of indigo that had arrived from Egypt became the object of dispute among a group of merchants from Palermo. The bale — dumped off a ship onto the beach of Mazara in western Sicily, some 110 kilometres from Palermo — was labelled on the outside with the name of Maá¹£liah b. Eliah, who was both the Jewish judge of Palermo and a merchant, but inside it contained seven discrete packages, three labelled with the name of both the owner and the receiving agent, and four with only the names of the receiving agents. ...

                C. Dyer. Poverty and its Relief in Late Medieval England (p. 41)
                Notes: 108

                [H]ow did the elderly, orphaned, widowed, disabled, sick, landless, low-paid and unemployed of England survive before the state introduced Poor Laws in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries? Historians believe that poor relief was transformed in the early modern period, but many accept that the procedures adopted between 1536 and 1601 and gradually implemented thereafter had forerunners in the Late Middle Ages. ...

                M. Smith. The Hanoverian Parish: Towards a New Agenda (p. 79)
                Notes: 83

                [T]he last twenty-five years have seen a resurgence of interest in a key structure of Hanoverian England: the parish. A significant amount of historical effort has been put into achieving a new understanding of parish life, but the result has been the development of two essentially parallel historiographies with remarkably little conversation between them. One of these historiographies is principally associated with the work of local historians and also social historians like Keith Snell and Steve Hindle. ...

                P.M. Jones. The Challenge of Land Reform in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century France (p. 107)
                Notes: 74

                [H]istorians have long been perplexed by the slowness of France's rural economy to modernize. After all, by the end of the eighteenth century abundant agronomic knowledge lay to hand and a far-reaching political revolution had removed most of the institutional impediments to restructuring of the countryside. Other European states were managing to transform agrarian relationships without these advantages and were starting to reap tangible benefits in consequence. In England, Denmark and southern Sweden change was so far advanced by the end of the century that it was visibly altering the landscape. In the German lands an equivalent transformation would not begin until the second half of the nineteenth century. Yet even here it occurred several decades before France took the decision to follow suit. ...

                M. Pittaway. National Socialism and the Production of German–Hungarian Borderland Space on the Eve of the Second World War (p. 143)
                Notes: 145

                [U]nder the terms of the Munich agreement in October 1938, Germany (which since the Anschluss seven months earlier had expanded to include Austria) annexed the town of Petrzalka from Czechoslovakia. Located less than forty miles east of Vienna and a mere fifteen miles from the Hungarian border, it had been part of the conurbation of Bratislava, Hungary's historic capital but since 1919 the capital of Slovakia. ...

                One of the oldest municipal parks in Europe (1774)

                S. Conrad. `The Colonial Ties are Liquidated': Modernization Theory, Post-War Japan and the Global Cold War (p. 181)
                Notes: 97

                [F]rom 29 August to 2 September 1960, thirty-one eminent scholars congregated for the `Conference on Modern Japan' in Hakone, a small hot-springs resort town just outside Tokyo, in the vicinity of Mount Fuji. The event was organized by the University of Michigan historian John W. Hall and others, and it included many prominent names in the contemporary Japanese humanities and social sciences, and their counterparts from other countries, mainly the United States. On the agenda were three days of intensive discussion on the issue of `modernization' in general and, more specifically, in the Japanese context. The conference was to be, in hindsight and owing to the major and influential publications issuing from five following meetings, a foundational moment for the introduction of modernization theory to Japan. ...

                Mount Fuji

                M.B. Karush. Blackness in Argentina: Jazz, Tango and Race Before Peron (p. 215)
                Notes: 83

                [O]n the question of race and nation, the dominant Latin American paradigm has never applied to Argentina. In Mexico, Brazil and elsewhere, twentieth-century nationalists crafted ideologies of mestizaje that broke with European and North American models by celebrating the indigenous or African as crucial elements in a new racial mixture. Yet most Argentine intellectuals rejected this sort of hybridity and instead constructed national identities that were at least as exclusionary as those produced by their North American counterparts. The only mixtures they countenanced were those that followed from European immigration. Just as the United States was a `melting pot', Argentina was a crisol de razas (crucible of races), in which Spaniards, Italians and other immigrant groups were fused into a new nation. This ideology, visible in the well-known aphorism that `Argentines descend from ships', marginalized Argentines of indigenous and African descent and eventually erased them from national consciousness. ...




                M.  Sonenscher. The Empire of Fashion and the Rise of Capitalism in Eighteenth-Century France (p. 247)
                Notes: 28

                `Fashionable consumption', Bill Sewell writes, `played a constitutive role in the development of French capitalism not only in the eighteenth century but also over the long term'. ...
                ===============================


















              • Prof. B.V. Toshev
                Just Received (subscription) PAST & PRESENT: A JOURNAL OF HISTORICAL STUDIES ISSN 1477-464x (Oxford University press)
                Message 7 of 12 , Dec 1, 2012
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                  Just Received (subscription)

                  PAST & PRESENT: A JOURNAL OF HISTORICAL STUDIES ISSN 1477-464x (Oxford University press)


                  Editors: L. Roper, S.A. Smith

                  Impact Factor, IF(2011)=0,247

                  Availability: all journals from 1996 to today.
                  =====================
                  ToC: Past & Present, Volume 217, November 2012
                  =====================
                  R. Fleming. Recycling in Britain after the Fall of Rome's Metal Economy (p. 3)
                  Notes: 108

                  E.R. Dusteler. Speaking in Tongues: Language and Communication in the Early Modern Mediterranean (p. 47)
                  Notes: 160

                  Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (1689-1762)

                  R.J. Ross. Distinguishing Eternal from Transient Law: Natural Law and the Judicial Laws of Moses (p. 79)
                  Notes: 75

                  M.P. Dziennik. Whig Tartan: Material Culture and its Use in the Scottish Highlands, 1746–1815 (p. 117)
                  Notes: 83

                  J. Horn. `A Beautiful Madness': Privilege, the Machine Question and Industrial Development in Normandy in 1789 (p. 149)
                  Notes: 96

                  MAP 1

                  J. Saha. A Mockery of Justice? Colonial Law, the Everyday State and Village Politics in the Burma Delta, c.1890–1910 (p. 187)
                  Notes: 91

                  S.A. Caunce. The Hiring Fairs of Northern England, 1890–1930: A Regional Analysis of Commercial and Social Networking in Agriculture (p. 213)
                  Notes: 108

                  M. Isabella. Rethinking Italy's Nation-Building 150 Years Afterwards: The New Risorgimento Historiography (p. 247)
                  Notes: 46
                  ============================




                • Borislav Toshev
                  Just Received (personal subscription) ToC: PAST & PRESENT, VOLUME 218, ISSUE 1, FEBRUARY 2013 http://past.oxfordjournals.org/content/218/1.toc all the
                  Message 8 of 12 , Apr 13, 2013
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                    Just Received (personal subscription)

                    ToC: PAST & PRESENT, VOLUME 218, ISSUE 1, FEBRUARY 2013


                    all the articles are available


                    Some illustrations from the issue:

                    1


                    ==========================

                    Professor B.V. Toshev,
                    University of Sofia,
                    1 James Bourchier Blvd.
                    1164 Sofia, BULGARIA
                  • Prof. B.V. Toshev
                    PAST & PRESENT: A JOURNAL OF HISTORICAL STUDIES ISSN 0031-2746 (Oxford University Press) Editors: S.A. Smith, A. Walsham [Past & Present] ===================
                    Message 9 of 12 , May 10, 2013
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                      PAST & PRESENT: A JOURNAL OF HISTORICAL STUDIES ISSN 0031-2746 (Oxford University Press)

                      Editors: S.A. Smith, A. Walsham

                      Past & Present

                      ===================

                      ToC: Past & Present, Number 219, May 2013

                      ====================

                      N.J. Mayhew. Prices in England, 1170-1750 (p. 3)

                      Notes: 89

                      U. Rublack. Matter in the Material Renaissance (p. 41)

                      Notes: 157

                      1

                      2

                      6

                      7

                      8

                      R. O'Hanlon. Performance in a World of Paper: Puranic Histories and Social Communication in Early Modern India (p. 87)

                      Notes: 138

                      L. Charles, P. Cheney. The Colonial Machine Dismantled: Knowledge and Empire in the French Atlantic (p. 127)

                      Notes: 73

                      R.W. Schatz. The Barons of Middletown and the Decline of the North-Eastern Anglo-Protestant Elite (p. 165)

                      Notes: 70

                      R. Overy. Pacifism and the Blitz, 1940-1941 (p. 201)

                      Notes: 117

                      W. Gould, T.C. Sherman, S. Ansari. The Flux of the Matter: Loyalty, Corruption and the 'Everyday State' in the Post-Partition Government Services in India and Pakistan (p. 237)

                      Notes: 149

                      =================

                      Reviewed by B.V. Toshev, 11 May 2013

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