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151 results from messages in beemonitoring

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  • The references in the Fellendorf paper mentioned in the original post cover most of the relevant literature on flooded bees. Perdita floridensis is quite amazing. Part of its underwater survival is based on using oxygen generated by algae How other andrenids (like those in vernal pools) survive submersion is something of a mystery as they don't spin cocoons and Perdita don't even...
    Jack Neff Jan 4
  • Another possibility is in "The Sacred Bee in Ancient Times and Folklore" by Hilda Ransome, originally published in 1937 but reprinted, BBNO, Burrowbridge, England. On page 21 is an illustration of the cave painting of men gathering honey in the Araña Cave, Bicorp, Valencia, orginally published in 1921 in the Bulletin of Real Sociedad Espanõla de Historia Natural Madrid (as cited...
    Jack Neff Jan 3
  • Mercuric chloride was commonly used on plants specimens in Latin American herbaria well into the 20th century (as at the Instituto Miguel Lillo, in Tucuman) and according to a Scottish web site, is sometimes still used today. Treated "modern" specimens usually come with a skull and cross bones but gloves are suggested for a lot of the older stuff, with or without a warning. best...
    Jack Neff Dec 6, 2015
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  • I believe the original post was about looking for instances of interference competition by socials vs. solitaties- active defense of floral resources as practiced by some meliponines - not simple resource exploitation which is the likely mechanism of any competitive interactions between Apis and solitaries. I don't believe honey bees actively defend floral resources so the proposed...
    Jack Neff Dec 6, 2015
  • I misread the original missive. Some meliponines are well known to forage aggressively - i.e. they defend particular floral resources against other species (or colonies). Most of the literature is about interactions among stingless bees but presumably solitaries wouldn't be welcome either. A good starting point for that literature might be pp 104-106 in Roubik, 1989 "Ecology and...
    Jack Neff Dec 4, 2015
  • other possibilities are Johnson and Hubbell, 1974 "Aggression and competition among stingless bees: field studies" Ecology 55: 120-127 Nieh et al, 2004 "Olfactory eavesdropping by a competitively foraging stingless bee, Trigona spinipes" Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B 271: 1633-1640 best Jack John L. Neff Central Texas Melittological Institute 7307 Running Rope Austin...
    Jack Neff Dec 4, 2015
  • Denny: The name, subgenal coronet, can be a bit misleading since it usually isn't a simple crown or single row of hairs. If you look at the surface just behind the mandibles from below you should see a pad-like area of short, stout orange hairs. That's it in erigeniae. It can vary considerably in extent and development from species to species, and as the key indicates, may be...
    Jack Neff Dec 3, 2015
  • Near Austin they are found in habitats with sandy soils (like the Lost Pines area of Bastrop County), but not necessarily what I would call deep sands. I can't speak for the rest of their distributions. best Jack John L. Neff Central Texas Melittological Institute 7307 Running Rope Austin,TX 78731 USA 512-345-7219 On Thursday, December 3, 2015 10:04 AM, "'Droege, Sam' sdroege@^$1...
    Jack Neff Dec 3, 2015
  • It doesn't change the story but reports of the toxicity of mannose to honey bees in the technical literature go back at least to 1934 (von Frisch, 1934 "Uber den Geschmackssinn der Bienen" Z. vergl. Physiol. 21:1-156 (cited in von Frisch, 1967 "The Dance Language and Orientation of Bees" Belknap Press, Cambridge, MA). Actual toxicity must occur at fairly high concentrations since...
    Jack Neff Nov 20, 2015
  • ...are extremely poisonous; if an arm is bitten or just breathed upon it will come off. On Thu, Nov 19, 2015 at 6:32 PM, Jack Neff < jlnatctmi@^$3 > wrote: Sam: See Pawilikowski, T. 2010. Journal of Apicultural Science 54:73-79. Available on line. The nectar is toxic to...
    Jack Neff Nov 20, 2015