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Tropical Butterfly expands range

(3)
Forgot to mention that it wouldn't be called a fritillary (Argynnini) , but rather an "acreaine" (tribe Acraeini). ________________________________ From:
Harvey, Don
3
posts
Mar 19

Fwd: Bees!

(4)
All: This, indeed, is an important paper for the following reasons. 1. They are studing a generalist pollen bee (i.e. a bumblebee) 2. They are directly
Droege, Sam
4
posts
Mar 19

Best yard

(4)
In one of our papers on Peponapis pruinosa, we had large numbers of nests/m**2. I will try to look that number up. Peter ________________________________
Peter Kevan
4
posts
Mar 14

Small workers of B. vagans versus B. sandersoni

(5)
Linc, Your offer to supply specimens, especially from western Canada is great. How have the species been determined, morphologically by hair color or by DNA?
Dennis E Johnson
5
posts
Mar 9

Ceratina as an easy to manage pollinator?

(6)
That article by McIntosh and the work by Vicruck and Richards (attached) have been really helpful to me in planning my research. I also got a lot of Pemphredon
Colleen S
6
posts
Mar 8

Announcing the Pithoteria

(5)
An idea I explored last year, but did not bring to fruition was a section on BugGuide where people can load pictures of bees using pithy-stemmed plants as well
Hillary Sardiñas
5
posts
Mar 8

Managing Pith/Stem Nesting Bees in Gardens/Landscapes/Bee Hotels

(17)
Here are some links in the 'grey' literature on our Aussie reed bees (and their affinity for the highly invasive exotic Lantana, another demonstration that
Kit Prendergast
17
posts
Mar 7

Bees of Toronto book free .pdf

(3)
Nice book. Good photos. My cousin brought it from Toronto for me. Anita Collins, Ph.D. USDA, ARS retired ... From: 'J. Scott MacIvor' jsmacivor@gmail.com
Anita Collins
3
posts
Feb 27

Does Wire Mesh Around Plants Decrease Visitation?

(5)
Folks- we have used coarse mesh screens for years to exclude vertebrates from small nesting shelters. If mammals (and their sharp incisors) are the problem,
Cane, Jim
5
posts
Feb 24

Any Known Bee Invaders of Honeybee Hives?

(4)
Jessica, See if this potentially invasive honey bee subspecies would apply. I worked with capensis hybrids while in South Africa (too briefly). Apis mellifera
Wyatt Mangum (wmangum)
4
posts
Feb 21

hopping micro bug

(3)
Hi Melina, I could be wrong, but I think the giveaway here is that forked yellow tail structure in the picture. To me that indicates that it is a springtail
Nicholas Anderson
3
posts
Feb 20

Bees of the Yellow sun dial

(3)
I thinks that's backwards.  Bee 1 (on the left) is a Dialictus and bee 2 (on the right) a Ceratina.  Both, obviously, females. John L. Neff Central Texas
Jack Neff
3
posts
Feb 18

beebread

(4)
Bee bread really just applies to honey bees.  Bee loaf, bee pudding and the like are cute but not generally accurate (highly liquid soupy or pudding-like
Jack Neff
4
posts
Feb 14

Can someone explain this behavior?

(7)
Thanks for all the interesting ideas presented! Lots to think about. Diane ************************************** Diane L. Larson Research Biologist US
Diane Larson
7
posts
Feb 8

Claytonia Oligolege in Western US?

(3)
The male you photographed is probably *A. anisochlora*. (Caveat: I have not actually seen this species, but the clypeus and mandible shape is very
Joel Gardner
3
posts
Feb 1
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