Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

BIML Update - Nomada, Osmia, Ceratina, Lasioglossum, Mystery Map

Expand Messages
  • Sam Droege
    USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Laboratory Update Nomada depressa - Some ongoing work on this species includes our proposal to synonymize N. azaleae and N.
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 21, 2010

      USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Laboratory Update


      Nomada depressa - Some ongoing work on this species includes our proposal to synonymize N. azaleae and N. media.  See the draft account below and if anyone has comments or additions it would be great to hear them.  Note that some late season specimens might be a separate species (these would key to or are at least consistent with the N. media account in Mitchell' but NOT the consistent with the type!, which is clearly N. depressa)  What western N. depressa really are is open to question....I think they are a different species as shown by barcoding and it looks like there is a N. hoodiana on the books that might be associated with those specimens...The type is on order and we will explore some of the western specimens from Terry's lab a bit more next month.

       
       
      Nomada depressa Cresson

      Nomada depressa Cresson 1863: 302 [ANSP (female)  label data:  "Me.// (female symbol)//Holotype 2560 [red label]"]; Cresson 1916: 117 [lectotype designation].
      Nomada azaleae Mitchell 1962: 403 [NMNH on indefinite loan from NC State (male) label data: ] new synonymy
      Nomada media Mitchell 1962:  421 [NMNH on indefinite loan from NC State (female) label data: ] new synonymy.
      Also in synonymy list of Mitchell:
      Nomada depressicauda Cockerell, 1908: 323 [ ??? () label data:  ].  Mitchell 1962: 413 [synonymy].  Note, 1/14/10...sam has requested from V. Scott a loan of this specimen from CU

      Diagnosis.

      Females - Unique among Nomada in the presence of an unusually extensive pseudopygidial area in the females (greater than half the longitudinal length of the 5th tergite) and that pseudopygidial area composed of extremely short dense hairs, somewhat similar to that found within the foveae of Andrena females.  The gena area is relatively wide, exceeding the width of the eye when viewed from the side.  Two through 4 stout, dark red setae are present at the apical end of the hind tibia, these setae approximately equal in height with the surrounding hairs.

       
      Males - Males are difficult to differentiate from closely allied species such as N. composita and N. inepta and the variability in integument markings and general scarcity of all these species makes its clear why the males have not been previously described/associated.  In most cases the following set of characters is diagnostic:  the presence of some combination of red, orange or yellow on the scutellum, at least a small patch of color (red or yellow or both) on the lower portion of the anterior face of the mesepisturnum; in many, but not all, individuals red and sometimes yellow is present and, at times, extensive throughout the scutum; and 2-3 reddish, translucent (which makes them often difficult to detect), relatively thick, setae at the apical end of the hind tibia that are shorter than the surrounding white hairs.  N. composita and N. inepta males usually (13 of 14 bar-coded specimens examined) have no red whatsoever on the thorax and 3-5, reddish, translucent, relatively think setae that equal or exceed the length of the surrounding white hairs.
       
      Distribution. - Examined specimens ranged from Nova Scotia and southern Ontario down to Tennessee and North Carolina.  Southern specimens were restricted to the Appalachian Mountains.  The only specimens from the relatively well collected Washington D.C. area came from Virginia in the Piedmont, but adjacent to the Fall Line.  Mitchell mentions this species occurring in Michigan (sam, need to check bees of Wisconsin)(Sam, incorporate note from Mike Arduser about the Midwest).  This species is widely reported from the Rocky Mountains to the West.  Barcoded specimens from these regions cluster with the eastern species, but form a distinct group within that cluster, but specimens have not yet been seen.
       
      Material examined. - 34 specimens examined.  

      Molecular results. - TBA

      Variation. - Both the males and the females vary greatly in the amount and distribution of red and yellow maculations.  The extent of yellow on the abdominal tergites can vary from none to a complete latitudinal stripe.  In females the most common condition (18 of 20 specimens) appears to be a lack of any yellow maculations on the head or thorax but at least 2 individuals had yellow present.  In one female specimen extensive amounts of yellow were present on the scutum, scutellum, head, mesepisturnum, and propodeum, while in the other yellow was restricted to the rear face of the propodeum.
       

      Discussion. -  Mitchell separated N. media from N. depressa based on the amount and kind of pitting of the scutum and tegula, and the amount of yellow on the propodeum.  We were unable to differentiate any appreciable difference in the amount of pitting on the tergites when examining the two holotypes side by side.  While the two are distinctly colored in terms of the amount of yellow, this is a character that tends to vary within a species,  (the N. media specimen is from the Smokies, and often specimens from this region differ in their patterns of coloration from elsewhere).  These following things are similar between the two:  mandibles, flagellar segment lengths, preoccipital carina strong on gena, pitting of scutum and tegula, scutellum of both are deeply cleft, setae at the basal end of the hind tibia are similar (although in N. media the setae seem to be a little darker, possibly due to age), pseudopygidial area erect, simple; reddish setae on face and mesosoma; small apicomedial notch on pygidial plate, red setae on disc of pygidial plate on both N. depressa and N. media; no yellow maculations on metasoma sterna. The following are dissimilar:  amount of yellow on propodeum (mostly red on N. depressa with two-thirds of the lateral surface red, but yellow and red in N. media), supraclypeal area with some yellow on N. media that's not present on the N. depressa; mesepisternum with oblong patch of yellow extending from lower anterior surface to center of lateral surface on N. media (no yellow maculation on N. depressa); tiny set of maculations on T4 on N. media (hard to tell on N. depressa holotype because T4 retracted and a bit discolored).  

      Mitchell's N. azaleae nicely matches the males that barcode with N. depressa specimens.

      Note, Cockerell mentions N. skinneri and N. hoodiana as being in the same group as N. depressa so we have ordered those types too.

      Osmia - Some additions to the ways of differentiating O. atriventris and O. distincta and O. pumila males

      O. atriventris vs O. distincta

      O. atriventris - Abdomen, S3, rim shape, width of concave portion of rim is half to three-quarters as wide as entire rim - NOTE - Rim is often retracted under S2 and is not visible without dissection - S3, hair length, LONG in the center of the concave section, REACHING PAST the upper margin of the rim - In direct comparison smaller, cleft in T7 deeper shallower and and more u-shaped

      O. distincta - Abdomen, S3, rim shape, width of concave portion of rim is equal to the entire rim, rim beginning to slope down at the point where upper and lower abdominal plates meet - NOTE - Rim is often retracted under S2 and is not visible without dissection - S3, hair length, Short in the center of the concave portion, NOT reaching past the upper margin of the rim - In direct comparison larger, cleft in T7 deeper and more v-shaped

      O. distincta vs. O. pumila

      O. pumila  - The flat or slightly concave anterior face of T1 is inscribed with many microscopic lines making the surface dull and reflecting relatively little light - Abdomen, S3, rim outline, width of concave portion in center of rim is 1/3 as wide as entire rim, rim beginning to slope down well inside point where upper and lower abdominal plates meet - S3, hairs, DO NOT all come together to a point in the center of the central concave portion of the rim - In direct comparison smaller, cleft in T7 deeper shallower and and more u-shaped

       O. distincta  - The flat or slightly concave anterior face of T1 is not inscribed with any or many microscopic lines and thus the surface is shiny and mirror like - Abdomen, S3, rim outline, width of concave portion in center of rim is equal to the entire rim, the rim beginning to slope down at point where upper and lower abdominal plates meet - S3, hairs, DO come together to a point in the center of the central concave portion of the rim - In direct comparison larger, cleft in T7 deeper and more v-shaped
       
      Crazy Weird Ceratina - From Adrian Carper's material from 2009 Raleigh, NC material

      Size of C. cockerelli or smaller.  However, the integument isn't at all like C. cockerelli (the smallest of Eastern Ceratina) but then it isn't like the other species so much either.

      So, in comparison to C. strenua (its about 1/2 the size of a C. strenua):

      • Female
      • Integument largely Ceratina blue, but without a green overtone that many C. strenua have, instead it seems to have some undertone of of a tannish kidney brown here and there....particularly on the rims of the tergites and sternites.
      • Legs are not blue but something that I would characterize as dirty ivory to kidney brown colored
      • Gena suffused with kidney brown
      • There is the usual white / ivory maculation on the clypeus but much wider than normal, occupying much of the width of the clypeus
      • Head is slightly more elongate
      • Distance between lateral ocelli equal to distance between lateral ocelli and compound eye
        Propodeal triangle with almost no striations
      • Tergites with pitting dense throughout, including the impressed rim (same density as base)
      L. imitatum with 2 submarginal Wing Cells - From 2009 material from Richard Orr, Howard County, Maryland

      This normally 3-celled species has but 2 submarginals, the second cross vein absent in both front wings.  This happens periodically in many species, but I haven't seen this in this species before...but it could be because I don't look at the wings...and Richard does.

      Mystery Map _ USGS Records - Hint: 2-cells



      Answer:


      L. imitatum is among if not the most common Lasioglossum in this region. It enjoys disturbed areas and your lawn undoubtedly houses many.  The other two are the only official 2-celled species in the East.  L.lustrans is a southerner...you can see it sneaking into the Eastern Shore of MD/DE/VA where it was unknown until collecting resurged in the last 10 years.  Note the one record in Kentucky.  L. anomalum, present, but more of a northern/central species really and we haven't done enough collecting up there ourselves to show that.

                                                     
      Sam Droege  sdroege@...                      
      w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
      USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
      BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
      Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov

      Amphion

      My father left a park to me,
      But it is wild and barren,
      A garden too with scarce a tree,
      And waster than a warren:
      Yet say the neighbours when they call,
      It is not bad but good land,
      And in it is the germ of all
      That grows within the woodland.


      O had I lived when song was great
      In days of old Amphion,
      And ta'en my fiddle to the gate,
      Nor cared for seed or scion!
      And had I lived when song was great,
      And legs of trees were limber,
      And ta'en my fiddle to the gate,
      And fiddled in the timber!


      'Tis said he had a tuneful tongue,
      Such happy intonation,
      Wherever he sat down and sung
      He left a small plantation;
      Wherever in a lonely grove
      He set up his forlorn pipes,
      The gouty oak began to move,
      And flounder into hornpipes.


      The mountain stirr'd its bushy crown,
      And, as tradition teaches,
      Young ashes pirouetted down
      Coquetting with young beeches;
      And briony-vine and ivy-wreath
      Ran forward to his rhyming,
      And from the valleys underneath
      Came little copses climbing.


      The linden broke her ranks and rent
      The woodbine wreaths that bind her,
      And down the middle, buzz! she went
      With all her bees behind her:
      The poplars, in long order due,
      With cypress promenaded,
      The shock-head willows two and two
      By rivers gallopaded.


      Came wet-shod alder from the wave,
      Came yews, a dismal coterie;
      Each pluck'd his one foot from the grave,
      Poussetting with a sloe-tree:
      Old elms came breaking from the vine,
      The vine stream'd out to follow,
      And, sweating rosin, plump'd the pine
      From many a cloudy hollow.


      And wasn't it a sight to see,
      When, ere his song was ended,
      Like some great landslip, tree by tree,
      The country-side descended;
      And shepherds from the mountain-eaves
      Look'd down, half-pleased, half-frighten'd,
      As dash'd about the drunken leaves
      The random sunshine lighten'd!


      Oh, nature first was fresh to men,
      And wanton without measure;
      So youthful and so flexile then,
      You moved her at your pleasure.
      Twang out, my fiddle! shake the twigs'
      And make her dance attendance;
      Blow, flute, and stir the stiff-set sprigs,
      And scirrhous roots and tendons.


      'Tis vain ! in such a brassy age
      I could not move a thistle;
      The very sparrows in the hedge
      Scarce answer to my whistle;
      'Or at the most, when three-parts-sick
      With strumming and with scraping,
      A jackass heehaws from the rick,
      The passive oxen gaping.


      But what is that I hear ? a sound
      Like sleepy counsel pleading;
      O Lord !--'tis in my neighbour's ground,
      The modern Muses reading.
      They read Botanic Treatises,
      And Works on Gardening thro' there,
      And Methods of transplanting trees
      To look as if they grew there.


      The wither'd Misses! how they prose
      O'er books of travell'd seamen,
      And show you slips of all that grows
      From England to Van Diemen.
      They read in arbours clipt and cut,
      And alleys, faded places,
      By squares of tropic summer shut
      And warm'd in crystal cases.


      But these, tho' fed with careful dirt,
      Are neither green nor sappy;
      Half-conscious of the garden-squirt,
      The spindlings look unhappy.
      Better to me the meanest weed
      That blows upon its mountain,
      The vilest herb that runs to seed
      Beside its native fountain.


      And I must work thro' months of toil,
      And years of cultivation,
      Upon my proper patch of soil
      To grow my own plantation.
      I'll take the showers as they fall,
      I will not vex my bosom:
      Enough if at the end of all
      A little garden blossom.


          - Alfred Lord Tennyson

      P Bees are not optional.
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.