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Updates to Discoverlife Guides for Coelioxys, Osmia, Xenoglossa, Peponapis,

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  • Sam Droege
    All: We make changes and update the Discoverlife Guides almost on a daily basis, most changes are minor, others, though, are more substantial. To better keep
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 30, 2009
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      All:

      We make changes and update the Discoverlife Guides almost on a daily basis, most changes are minor, others, though, are more substantial.  To better keep people up to date on changes we will now list the more substantial ones on the listserv periodically. for those of you who are interested in such things.....

      Coelioxys - Females - Differentiating C. rufitarse from C. moesta and C. porterae

      C. rufitarse vs C. moesta and C. porterae, abdomen, T6, overall profile of the lateral sides of this segment when viewed directly from above - As in the genus in general this is a elongated segment, coming to a narrow point.

      C. rufitarse - The overall shape clearly not that of a smooth sigmoid curve, about half way down the sides the outline clearly broken by a sharp angle inward creating distinct obtuse corners, these corners formed by the presence of a wide and deep trough or hollow that cuts into the segment below these corners and runs towards but not past the centerline

      C. moesta and C. porterae - In both these species the overall shape is that of a smooth, gentle, sigmoid curve uninterrupted by any angles, although, interior to the sides there may be shallow hollows or indentations of various sorts from about half to one third of the way towards the tip, but these not influencing in any significant way the smooth outline of the segment

      Genera Guide - Xenoglossa vs Peponapis - Previous characters depended largely on the presence of a small inner tooth in Xenoglossa mandibles, since this tooth was almost always hidden it wasn't that helpful in differentiating the two genera.

      Female, Peponapis vs Xenoglossa

      Peponapis - Base of mandibles, clypeus and labrum all DARK

      Xenoglossa - Base of mandibles and to more variable extent clypeus and labrum with clearly YELLOW markings

      Male, Peponapis vs Xenoglossa

      Peponapis - Base of mandibles DARK - First flagellar segment several time SHORTER than second

      Xenoglossa - Base of mandibles with clear YELLOW markings - 1st flagellar segment clearly LONGER than second

      Osmia - Differentiating O. chalybea from O. texana  

      Females

      O. chalybea vs O. texana - Two very uncommon, large species with a prominent, elevated, forward projecting mound on the clypeus, the front rim of which is emarginated or notched

      O. chalybea - Distance between the outside edges of the two lateral ocelli equal to or GREATER THAN the distance between the edge of a lateral ocellus and the compound eye - Lower part of the propodeal triangle so heavily inscribed by microscopic lines that it reflects NO light - Clypeal projection without a small central point - In direct comparison larger, pitting along central line of scutum more widely spaced, and ocelli larger - Comes out in early spring

      O. texana - Distance between the outside edges of the two lateral ocelli LESS THAN the distance between the edge of a lateral ocellus and the compound eye - Lower part of the propodeal triangle, while inscribed with some microscopic lines, is light enough that this region clearly REFLECTS some light and is slightly shiny - Clypeal projection with a small central forward projecting point in the middle of the central notch - In direct comparison smaller, pitting along central line of scutum denser with fewer areas of clear gaps, and ocelli smaller - Comes out in summer

      Males

      O. chalybea vs O. texana - Two very uncommon large species

      O. chalybea - T4 with white outer hairs and a patch of distinct BLACK HAIRS in the center - In direct comparison, clearly larger, more southern in distribution, the ocelli diameter larger and the wings darker - An early spring species

      O. texana - T4 hairs ENTIRELY WHITE - In direct comparison, clearly smaller, more northern in distribution, the ocelli diameter smaller and the wings lighter, but still at least a little bit smoky - A summer species

      sam

                                                     
      Sam Droege  sdroege@...                      
      w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
      USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
      BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
      Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov



      NO COMMENT

      In the leaf's veins and midrib,
      the mushroom's gill: no irony.


      In the stamen and pistil,
      the pip of the grape, making


      occurs without suffering,
      one is led to suppose.


      When the fawn sprawled in a thicket
      stiffens, a council of birds


      descends and pecks
      until its chest is crimson.


      The badger's project
      is isolation: he knows


      only to burrow and sleep,
      while the spider spins


      in a web wider, more intricate
      than his, though this crisis


      does not cross his mind.
      He proceeds without comment.


      Then what is one to do
      on a night like this, bright almost


      as day, when the lavender moon,
      burdened with light,


      is near enough to brush
      the trees and power lines, when this fern


      rooted at the road's edge
      casts the shadow of an infant's ribs?



      Chris Forhan

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