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Re: bee marking

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  • kjard_us
    In the ant world many people have moved to little steel bands tied around the legs. The ants were just too good at cleaning themselves.
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 11, 2009
      In the ant world many people have moved to little steel bands tied around the legs. The ants were just too good at cleaning themselves.

      --- In beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com, T'ai Roulston <thr8z@...> wrote:
      >
      > My own method is similar to Doug's and seems to have little effect on
      > bee mortality. I've been working with Colletes latitarsis, fairly
      > similar in size to his Halictus. I had trouble keeping enamel paints
      > on sweat bees in prior work --the bees were very good at grooming it
      > off, though sometimes they didn't. What I use now is different colors
      > of liquid paper (yellow, pink, white and either green or blue --not
      > both as they are hard to distinguish). The liquid paper serves as a
      > base color on the thorax then I write patterns with different colors
      > using fine-tipped sharpies. I've had 125 bees marked individually like
      > this without problem, over 3 weeks in the field without degradation.
      >
      > This method works great on Colletes but not so well on Peponapis. I
      > don't know why. At first I thought it was because Peponapis is much
      > hairier, but I found that removing the hair on Peponapis first didn't
      > maintain the integrity of the marks for very long. So there may be
      > some species specificity to technique effectiveness.
      >
      > I've tried gluing tiny numbers to bees without much success. The Von
      > Frisch tags worked fine for big bees like Apis or bigger ones, but on
      > smaller bees with smaller tags made of paper encased in plastic tape I
      > had trouble keeping from gluing the bee's wings together, or my
      > fingers together, or my fingers to the bee's wings, and even when I
      > was successful it didn't seem to last long. I'd be interested in a
      > refined gluing method, such as Jerry developed, but the liquid paper
      > method works very well and is quite forgiving.
      >
      > T'ai
      >
      > On Nov 10, 2009, at 7:47 PM, Jerry_Freilich@... wrote:
      >
      > >
      > > OK all you bee people. I'm an aquatic guy but I developed a method
      > > that
      > > might be useful for marking bees. When I first started working on
      > > tagging
      > > stonefly nymphs everyone showed me to the standard literature on bee
      > > tags
      > > and little enamel dots. "Fine for the bee people," I said, but I
      > > needed
      > > another method that was better for aquatic animals, that resisted
      > > physical
      > > abrasion (from rocks in the benthos), and that was quicker to apply.
      > >
      > > The method I developed uses tiny pieces of "plastic paper" with 3-4
      > > digit
      > > numbers appearing on each 2x3 mm tag. I used gel type Super Glue
      > > which is
      > > incredibly fast drying and survived very well (under water!) in
      > > durability
      > > tests. I am sure these tags would be even better, even faster
      > > applying, and
      > > longer lasting on nice clean dry bees.
      > >
      > > Here's the citation: Freilich, J.E. 1989. A method for tagging
      > > individual
      > > benthic insects. Journal of the North American Benthological Society
      > > 8 (4):
      > > 351-354.
      > >
      > > I cannot speak for toxicity of cyanoacrylate adhesives, but recall
      > > that
      > > these were developed for holding (human) skin together as a quick
      > > way of
      > > securing combat wounds in battle. My understanding is that the
      > > adhesives
      > > are regarded as biologically neutral.
      > >
      > > I would be very curious to know if this method works on bees and I
      > > would be
      > > willing to offer practical tips and advice to those interested in
      > > trying
      > > it. One tip... for example... is that these tiny tags are very light
      > > weight
      > > and could blow away in the wind while working in the field. I
      > > discovered
      > > that working on a cloth towel is the solution. The tags fall into
      > > the loops
      > > of fabric and will resist even the strongest wind. It's amazing
      > > really. Let
      > > me know if I can tempt anyone to try this.
      > > __________________________
      > > Jerry Freilich, Ph.D.
      > > Research Coordinator, Olympic National Park
      > > Coordinator, North Coast & Cascades Science Learning Network
      > > Olympic National Park
      > > 600 E. Park Ave.
      > > Port Angeles, WA 98362
      > >
      > > Phone: 360-565-3082
      > > Fax: 360-565-3070
      > > Cell: 360-477-3338
      > > Jerry_Freilich@...
      > >
      > > "This is the most beautiful place on earth,
      > > there are many such places..."
      > > Edward Abbey
      > > ___________________________
      > >
      > >
      >
      > T'ai Roulston
      > Curator, State Arboretum of Virginia
      > Research Assoc. Prof., Dept of Envi. Sci.
      > University of Virginia
      > tai.roulston@...
      >
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