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A Survey Design for North American Native Bees

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  • Sam Droege
    All: Gretchen LeBuhn, Ed Connor, and myself have been working this past year on a survey design for North American Native Bees along with quite a number of
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 25, 2009

      All:

      Gretchen LeBuhn, Ed Connor, and myself have been working this past year on a survey design for North American Native Bees along with quite a number of others (many thanks for all the data sharing).  We have submitted a paper to Science and managed to be part of the 97% of the papers submitted to Science that are rejected and so will submit down the food chain until, perhaps, we have to self-publish.  In the meantime we have made a presentation at the 2009 North American Pollinator Protection Campaign meeting unveiling our strategy to wider scrutiny.  

      You can see that talk at:

      http://www.slideshare.net/sdroege/survey-design-for-monitoring-north-american-native-bees

      Not a lot of detail is presented as we didn't want to scare people with statistics, but if you like such things we would be happy to email you a draft.  You can reach me at sdroege@... to do so.

      We are now moving towards the negotiations table to start putting together some funding.

      Below are some of the essential elements.

      1.  A statistically reasonable program can be put together that will capture 1-2% per year changes in bee populations over a 5 year window using 100 sampling sites.
      2.  The sampling frame for those 100 sites is open to all sorts of possibilities, but the answer (unless you want to define the goals, definitions, and parameters differently) will always be 100.
      3.  So, for example, we have proposed that the federal groups that manage large amounts of public lands (USFS, USFWS, NPS, DOD, BLM, BuRec) all could assess how their properties are doing using 100 surveys sites.  So, too could a state or the USDA could sample all orchards across the U.S. ...and so forth.
      4. A survey location is simply a transect of 24 or 30 bowls (we haven't decided, the Canadians are using 30, so we may go that way for comparability) of 3 colors, spaced 50m apart and run on an appropriate day every 2 weeks throughout the season.  Each site would be run only 1 time every 5 years and the starting year for sites would be spaced across four years.
      5.  Specimens will be bagged and shipped to 2 proposed processing centers.
      6.  Costs per site will be low and overall costs will largely be that of supporting a coordinator and technicians to process specimens.  As an example we estimated if 4 programs were created for 4 different management or agricultural groups, using 200 sites each (we used 200 rather than 100 so we would have a better initial estimation of change), they would generate 170,000 specimens a year and in addition to the coordinator it would take 2 additional people (FTE's) to process that amount.  (see http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/BBS/ for an example of a program, run by volunteers, that drives much of the large scale conservation of birds).
      7.  The beauty of this system, and any monitoring program, really; is that it increases in statistical power with time.  As the system continues it become possible to track trends of many of the individual species, look at regional patterns, split things by guilds, genera, etc.
      8. Because everything is standardized all sorts of biogeographical and ecological analyses are possible.

      Well, it looks like I will remain busy with all this for a few more years.......

      sam

                                                     
      Sam Droege  sdroege@...                      
      w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
      USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
      BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
      Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov

      "They've got this steamroller going, and they won't stop until there's nobody fishing. What are they going to do then, save some bees?"
      Mike Russo

      (Massachusetts fisherman who has fished cod for 18 years, on environmentalist)



    • Griswold, Terry
      I wish the survey proposal a healthy future. I would suggest using the 30 bowls. There are now multiple data sets using 30 bowls in 3 colors from diverse
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 26, 2009

        I wish the survey proposal a healthy future.   I would suggest using the 30 bowls.  There are now multiple data sets using 30 bowls in 3 colors from diverse ecosystems that could be used as baseline data.

         

        terry

         

        Terry Griswold

        USDA ARS Bee Biology & Systematics Laboratory
        Utah State University
        Logan, UT 84322-5310
        USA

        435.797.2526

        435.797.0461 Fax

         

        From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Sam Droege
        Sent: Sunday, October 25, 2009 7:36 PM
        To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
        Cc: Gretchen LeBuhn
        Subject: [beemonitoring] A Survey Design for North American Native Bees

         

         


        All:

        Gretchen LeBuhn, Ed Connor, and myself have been working this past year on a survey design for North American Native Bees along with quite a number of others (many thanks for all the data sharing).  We have submitted a paper to Science and managed to be part of the 97% of the papers submitted to Science that are rejected and so will submit down the food chain until, perhaps, we have to self-publish.  In the meantime we have made a presentation at the 2009 North American Pollinator Protection Campaign meeting unveiling our strategy to wider scrutiny.  

        You can see that talk at:

        http://www.slideshare.net/sdroege/survey-design-for-monitoring-north-american-native-bees

        Not a lot of detail is presented as we didn't want to scare people with statistics, but if you like such things we would be happy to email you a draft.  You can reach me at sdroege@... to do so.

        We are now moving towards the negotiations table to start putting together some funding.

        Below are some of the essential elements.

        1.  A statistically reasonable program can be put together that will capture 1-2% per year changes in bee populations over a 5 year window using 100 sampling sites.
        2.  The sampling frame for those 100 sites is open to all sorts of possibilities, but the answer (unless you want to define the goals, definitions, and parameters differently) will always be 100.
        3.  So, for example, we have proposed that the federal groups that manage large amounts of public lands (USFS, USFWS, NPS, DOD, BLM, BuRec) all could assess how their properties are doing using 100 surveys sites.  So, too could a state or the USDA could sample all orchards across the U.S. ...and so forth.
        4. A survey location is simply a transect of 24 or 30 bowls (we haven't decided, the Canadians are using 30, so we may go that way for comparability) of 3 colors, spaced 50m apart and run on an appropriate day every 2 weeks throughout the season.  Each site would be run only 1 time every 5 years and the starting year for sites would be spaced across four years.
        5.  Specimens will be bagged and shipped to 2 proposed processing centers.
        6.  Costs per site will be low and overall costs will largely be that of supporting a coordinator and technicians to process specimens.  As an example we estimated if 4 programs were created for 4 different management or agricultural groups, using 200 sites each (we used 200 rather than 100 so we would have a better initial estimation of change), they would generate 170,000 specimens a year and in addition to the coordinator it would take 2 additional people (FTE's) to process that amount.  (see http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/BBS/ for an example of a program, run by volunteers, that drives much of the large scale conservation of birds).
        7.  The beauty of this system, and any monitoring program, really; is that it increases in statistical power with time.  As the system continues it become possible to track trends of many of the individual species, look at regional patterns, split things by guilds, genera, etc.
        8. Because everything is standardized all sorts of biogeographical and ecological analyses are possible.

        Well, it looks like I will remain busy with all this for a few more years.......

        sam


                                                       
        Sam Droege  sdroege@...                      
        w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
        USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
        BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
        Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov

        "They've got this steamroller going, and they won't stop until there's nobody fishing. What are they going to do then, save some bees?"
        Mike Russo

        (Massachusetts fisherman who has fished cod for 18 years, on environmentalist)


      • Sam Droege
        Thanks Terry, We are leaning towards 30.....who wouldn t want more bees to look at anyway! sam Sam Droege sdroege@usgs.gov w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 26, 2009

          Thanks Terry,

          We are leaning towards 30.....who wouldn't want more bees to look at anyway!

          sam

          Sam Droege  sdroege@...                      
          w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
          USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
          BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
          Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov
                                               
          To Carelessness


          You led me to sling my rifle
          Over my shoulder when its bayonet was fixed
          On Leyte, in the jungle. It hit a hornets' nest
          And I fell down
          Screaming. The hornets attacked me, and Lonnie,
          The corporal, said "Soldier get off your ass!"
          Later the same day, I stepped on a booby trap
          That was badly wired. You
          Had been there too.
          Thank you. It didn't explode.


                  - Kenneth Koch
          P Bees are not optional.


          From:"Griswold, Terry" <terry.griswold@...>
          To:<beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
          Date:10/26/2009 10:52 AM
          Subject:RE: [beemonitoring] A Survey Design for North American Native Bees
          Sent by:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com





           

          I wish the survey proposal a healthy future.   I would suggest using the 30 bowls.  There are now multiple data sets using 30 bowls in 3 colors from diverse ecosystems that could be used as baseline data.

           

          terry

           

          Terry Griswold

          USDA ARS Bee Biology & Systematics Laboratory
          Utah State University
          Logan, UT 84322-5310
          USA

          435.797.2526

          435.797.0461 Fax

           

          From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Sam Droege
          Sent:
          Sunday, October 25, 2009 7:36 PM
          To:
          beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
          Cc:
          Gretchen LeBuhn
          Subject:
          [beemonitoring] A Survey Design for North American Native Bees

           

           


          All:


          Gretchen LeBuhn, Ed Connor, and myself have been working this past year on a survey design for North American Native Bees along with quite a number of others (many thanks for all the data sharing).  We have submitted a paper to Science and managed to be part of the 97% of the papers submitted to Science that are rejected and so will submit down the food chain until, perhaps, we have to self-publish.  In the meantime we have made a presentation at the 2009 North American Pollinator Protection Campaign meeting unveiling our strategy to wider scrutiny.  


          You can see that talk at:


          http://www.slideshare.net/sdroege/survey-design-for-monitoring-north-american-native-bees

          Not a lot of detail is presented as we didn't want to scare people with statistics, but if you like such things we would be happy to email you a draft.  You can reach me at sdroege@... to do so.


          We are now moving towards the negotiations table to start putting together some funding.


          Below are some of the essential elements.


          1.  A statistically reasonable program can be put together that will capture 1-2% per year changes in bee populations over a 5 year window using 100 sampling sites.

          2.  The sampling frame for those 100 sites is open to all sorts of possibilities, but the answer (unless you want to define the goals, definitions, and parameters differently) will always be 100.

          3.  So, for example, we have proposed that the federal groups that manage large amounts of public lands (USFS, USFWS, NPS, DOD, BLM, BuRec) all could assess how their properties are doing using 100 surveys sites.  So, too could a state or the USDA could sample all orchards across the U.S. ...and so forth.

          4. A survey location is simply a transect of 24 or 30 bowls (we haven't decided, the Canadians are using 30, so we may go that way for comparability) of 3 colors, spaced 50m apart and run on an appropriate day every 2 weeks throughout the season.  Each site would be run only 1 time every 5 years and the starting year for sites would be spaced across four years.

          5.  Specimens will be bagged and shipped to 2 proposed processing centers.

          6.  Costs per site will be low and overall costs will largely be that of supporting a coordinator and technicians to process specimens.  As an example we estimated if 4 programs were created for 4 different management or agricultural groups, using 200 sites each (we used 200 rather than 100 so we would have a better initial estimation of change), they would generate 170,000 specimens a year and in addition to the coordinator it would take 2 additional people (FTE's) to process that amount.  (see
          http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/BBS/ for an example of a program, run by volunteers, that drives much of the large scale conservation of birds).
          7.  The beauty of this system, and any monitoring program, really; is that it increases in statistical power with time.  As the system continues it become possible to track trends of many of the individual species, look at regional patterns, split things by guilds, genera, etc.
          8. Because everything is standardized all sorts of biogeographical and ecological analyses are possible.


          Well, it looks like I will remain busy with all this for a few more years.......


          sam


                                                       
          Sam Droege  sdroege@...                      
          w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
          USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
          BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705

          Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov

          "They've got this steamroller going, and they won't stop until there's nobody fishing. What are they going to do then, save some bees?"
          Mike Russo


          (Massachusetts fisherman who has fished cod for 18 years, on environmentalist)




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