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April Workshop on Native Bee Identification at Patuxent

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  • Sam Droege
    All: It looks like we might have room for one or two additional participants at the Native Bee Identification Workshop we will be holding from April 16th to
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 20, 2007
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      All:

      It looks like we might have room for one or two additional participants at the Native Bee Identification Workshop we will be holding from April 16th to the 20th.  We will be emphasizing eastern bee identification at the species level.  In addition to myself, Rob Jean will be one of the instructors.

      Earlier today I sent personal invitations to everyone who mentioned they wanted to take the workshop.  If you have not heard back from me then please contact me as soon as possible!

      The details are described in the attached file.

      Thanks.

      sam


                                                     
      Sam Droege  Sam_Droege@...                      
      w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
      USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
      BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
      Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov


      Elm Buds

      Elm buds are out.
      Yesterday morning, last night,
       they crept out.
      They are the mice of early
       spring air.


      To the north is the gray sky.
      Winter hung it gray for the gray
       elm to stand dark against.
      Now the branches all end with the
       yellow and gold mice of early
       spring air.
      They are moving mice creeping out
       with leaf and leaf.

               -Carl Sandburg
    • Gaye Williams
      sam, i d like to do part of the workshop, am just starting chemo and phys. therapy for cancer and don t know now what sched. will be then. can you pencil me in
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 20, 2007
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        sam, i'd like to do part of the workshop, am just starting chemo and phys. therapy for cancer and don't know now what sched. will be then. can you pencil me in as a floater? have my own scope, etc. let me know.

        Gaye Williams
        Md. Dept. Agr.-Pl. Prot. Sect.
        50 Truman Pkwy
        Annapolis,Md 21401
        p-410 841 5920
        f- 5835
      • BetsyKlinger@aol.com
        Sam, I am interested in taking part in the workshop, although I am a neophyte and was only able to come to one open lab so far. I expect to have a LOT more
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 20, 2007
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          Sam, 
           
          I am interested in taking part in the workshop, although I am a neophyte and was only able to come to one open lab so far.   I expect to have a LOT more time beginning in May.
           
          Please let me know if you think you'll have room for me.
           
          Thanks,
          Betsy


          All:

          It looks like we might have room for one or two additional participants at the Native Bee Identification Workshop we will be holding from April 16th to the 20th.  We will be emphasizing eastern bee identification at the species level.  In addition to myself, Rob Jean will be one of the instructors.

          Earlier today I sent personal invitations to everyone who mentioned they wanted to take the workshop.  If you have not heard back from me then please contact me as soon as possible!

          The details are described in the attached file.

          Thanks.

          sam

           




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        • Malinda Slagle
          Hi all- I was wondering if anyone knew anything about the Nosema ceranae parasite that supposedly is affecting Spanish honeybee hives
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 20 6:26 AM
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            Message
             Hi all-
            I was wondering if anyone knew anything about the Nosema ceranae parasite that supposedly is affecting Spanish honeybee hives (http://www.planetark.com/dailynewsstory.cfm/newsid/43163/story.htm).  Could this be in any way related to the colony collapse disorder here in the United States?
            A quick search on Wikipedia suggests that this may indeed be the case, but I was wondering if anyone had more scientific documentation on this.
            Thanks-
            Malinda

            Malinda W. Slagle
            Restoration Ecologist
            Litzsinger Road Ecology Center
            Missouri Botanical Garden
            9711 Litzsinger Rd
            St Louis MO 63124
            314-961-4410
            malinda.slagle@...

            To discover and share knowledge about plants and their environment, in order to preserve and enrich life.
            -mission of the Missouri Botanical Garden

             

          • frozenbeedoc@cs.com
            Dear Group, I ve been talking to members of the colony collapse disorder research coallition of Penn State, USDA, ARS Beltsville, and North Carolina State U.
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 20 9:35 AM
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              Dear Group,

              I've been talking to members of the colony collapse disorder research coallition of Penn State, USDA, ARS Beltsville, and North Carolina State U.  they've been looking at everything they have tools to look at, including using the honey bee genome results to sort out all the DNA from samples.  turns out that most of the Nosema in the U.S. is ceranae, and has been for some time.  And this is not consistently found with dead colonies.  If fact, many colonies have everything, viruses, foulbroods, mites, etc.  They have some leads, but we are all betting that it is not just one thing, but a host of stressors.  Including management styles.  Work continues at a great rate. 

              Anita M. Collins
              USDA, ARS, Bee Research Lab, RETIRED.
            • David_r_smith@fws.gov
              I am new to the native bee monitoring world so please bear with me on a basic entomological question. Most of my previous monitoring work is on aquatic
              Message 6 of 6 , Aug 2, 2007
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                I am new to the native bee monitoring world so please bear with me on a basic entomological question.  Most of my previous monitoring work is on aquatic insects.

                Is anyone aware of a reference for constructing light traps for night-flying insects?  I'd rather build one then buy one.  This will give me something to do at night after checking pan traps for bees.

                Thanks a lot,

                Dave Smith
                U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
                323 N. Leroux St., Suite 101
                Flagstaff, AZ  86001
                (928) 226-0614 x 109
                "Field data is the best cure for a precarious prediction"  Dave Rosgen
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