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Re: [beemonitoring] Insect trap idea - cheap "plexiglass"

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  • Denis_Kearns@ca.blm.gov
    Laura - Cheap alternatives to plexiglass: 1. The plastic from a laminator machine. Just run the machine without anything to laminate. The resulting clear
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 31, 1969
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      Laura -

      Cheap alternatives to plexiglass:

      1. The plastic from a laminator machine. Just run the machine without
      anything to laminate. The resulting clear plastic is fairly stiff,
      however, you will have to attach the panels to wire frames (to make them
      stiff enough to stand upright).

      2. Another source of cheap clear plastic can be found at garage sales -
      all kinds of (generally ugly) framed artwork can be obtained for little
      money - take the plexiglass (or whatever plastic is substituted for glass)
      and recycle the rest. For a more expensive source, visit thrift stores.

      I'm not sure how long the various plastics hold up in the sun, but they
      should be fine for at least one season.

      Good luck with your study - sounds like fun.

      - Denis

      Denis M. Kearns
      Botanist
      Bureau of Land Management
      Bakersfield Field Office
      (661) 391-6115
    • athenarayne@yahoo.com
      All: I m a doctoral student at the University of Georgia studying bumble bees. I ve designed a simple survey to gather information about bumble bee nest sites
      Message 2 of 6 , May 17 8:13 AM
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      All:

      I'm a doctoral student at the University of Georgia studying bumble bees. I've designed a simple survey to gather information about bumble bee nest sites that can be filled out by anyone who finds a nest. Please consider filling out my survey if you find a nest at any time this year, and feel free to pass this along to anyone you think might be interested. The corresponding email address is identified on the survey.

      Many thanks!
      Athena Anderson

    • LAURA RUSSO
      Hi, I hope it is okay to send this out on the list-serve. I am trying to design an insect trap that mixes the Texas cone, the window, and the pan trap. I
      Message 3 of 6 , May 18 2:39 PM
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      Hi,
      I hope it is okay to send this out on the list-serve.  I am trying to design an insect trap that mixes the Texas cone, the window, and the pan trap.  I pieced together ideas from different papers and pictures that I saw to come up with this idea.  I am hoping to collect more than just bees, although bees are a critical part of my experiment.  The idea is that insects will fly into the plexiglas and either fly up into the cone trap, or fall down into the pan trap.
      It had to be somewhat cheap, easy to set up and take down, and able to withstand some weather.  I'm a brand new grad student, so I welcome any comments and suggestions that you might have on whether this will actually work!

      Thank you,
      Laura Russo
    • Sam Droege
      Hi Laura: I like your idea. I recall a somewhat similar trap that I read about that was deployed in what I think was Denmark, possibly it was the Netherlands.
      Message 4 of 6 , May 18 4:25 PM
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        Hi Laura:

        I like your idea.  I recall a somewhat similar trap that I read about that was deployed in what I think was Denmark, possibly it was the Netherlands.  They used a large yellow pan trap and then used plexiglass baffles similar to yours.  They caught quite a few bees in the trap.  I think a number of us have seen bees flying down and over pan traps without actually going into them.  Additionally, I was talking to some beetle heads this weekend who said they often get good numbers of large bees in their window pane traps (the bees and beetles strike the window and fall into a narrow pan of soapy water or glycol) adding credibility to using something like you will be building.  I would say the most problematic part might be the cone part which looks difficult to fabricate.

        It would be great to make a set of these traps and run them concurrently but vary whether they have wings and cone parts on or off to test to see how many additional capture they generate.  We have been running larger pan traps all this spring and have found that bees easily hold up a week in just plain water.   Salt in the water appears to keep the bacteria and algae populations more in check.  By the end of summer we should have more information and look forward to seeing how your trap evolves.

        sam

                                                       
        Sam Droege  sdroege@...                      
        w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
        USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
        BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
        Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov


         Further in Summer than the Birds
        Pathetic from the Grass
        A minor Nation celebrates
        Its unobtrusive Mass.


         No Ordinance be seen
        So gradual the Grace
        A pensive Custom it becomes
        Enlarging Loneliness.


         Antiquest felt at Noon
        When August burning low
        Arise this spectral Canticle
        Repose to typify


         Remit as yet no Grace
        No Furrow on the Glow
        Yet a Druidic Difference
        Enhances Nature now


                         -- Emily Dickinson



        From:"LAURA RUSSO" <lar322@...>
        To:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
        Date:05/18/2009 05:41 PM
        Subject:[beemonitoring] Insect trap idea [1 Attachment]
        Sent by:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com







        [Attachment(s) from LAURA RUSSO included below]

        Hi,
        I hope it is okay to send this out on the list-serve.  I am trying to design an insect trap that mixes the Texas cone, the window, and the pan trap.  I pieced together ideas from different papers and pictures that I saw to come up with this idea.  I am hoping to collect more than just bees, although bees are a critical part of my experiment.  The idea is that insects will fly into the plexiglas and either fly up into the cone trap, or fall down into the pan trap.
        It had to be somewhat cheap, easy to set up and take down, and able to withstand some weather.  I'm a brand new grad student, so I welcome any comments and suggestions that you might have on whether this will actually work!

        Thank you,
        Laura Russo



      • LAURA RUSSO
        Thank you for all of the great tips! I m afraid I will have to revise my plan a little bit, however. The plexiglas sheets turned out to be quite beyond my
        Message 5 of 6 , May 19 2:45 PM
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        Thank you for all of the great tips!  I'm afraid I will have to revise my plan a little bit, however.  The plexiglas sheets turned out to be quite beyond my budget (150$ a sheet!).  My modified version will replace the plexiglas with white bridal tulle as netting and PVC pipes at the four corners.  I think this will turn out to be much more affordable.  Other modifications: (1) the cone can be made out of a flexible vinyl sheet (2) I found a PVC adaptor at Lowe's which will allow me to connect a 3 in diameter PVC (the top of the cone trap) with a 1.5 in PVC (in the bottle of alcohol).  If you're curious, I attached my alternate trap plan.
        Again, thanks for all the help!

        Laura

        On Mon, May 18, 2009 07:25 PM, Sam Droege <sdroege@...> wrote:


        Hi Laura:

        I like your idea.  I recall a somewhat similar trap that I read about that was deployed in what I think was Denmark, possibly it was the Netherlands.  They used a large yellow pan trap and then used plexiglass baffles similar to yours.  They caught quite a few bees in the trap.  I think a number of us have seen bees flying down and over pan traps without actually going into them.  Additionally, I was talking to some beetle heads this weekend who said they often get good numbers of large bees in their window pane traps (the bees and beetles strike the window and fall into a narrow pan of soapy water or glycol) adding credibility to using something like you will be building.  I would say the most problematic part might be the cone part which looks difficult to fabricate.

        It would be great to make a set of these traps and run them concurrently but vary whether they have wings and cone parts on or off to test to see how many additional capture they generate.  We have been running larger pan traps all this spring and have found that bees easily hold up a week in just plain water.   Salt in the water appears to keep the bacteria and algae populations more in check.  By the end of summer we should have more information and look forward to seeing how your trap evolves.

        sam

                                                       
        Sam Droege  sdroege@usgs.gov                      
        w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
        USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
        BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
        Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov



         Further in Summer than the Birds
        Pathetic from the Grass
        A minor Nation celebrates
        Its unobtrusive Mass.


         No Ordinance be seen
        So gradual the Grace
        A pensive Custom it becomes
        Enlarging Loneliness.


         Antiquest felt at Noon
        When August burning low
        Arise this spectral Canticle
        Repose to typify


         Remit as yet no Grace
        No Furrow on the Glow
        Yet a Druidic Difference
        Enhances Nature now


                         -- Emily Dickinson



        From: "LAURA RUSSO" <lar322@...>
        To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
        Date: 05/18/2009 05:41 PM
        Subject: [beemonitoring] Insect trap idea [1 Attachment]
        Sent by:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com







        [Attachment(s) from LAURA RUSSO included below]

        Hi,
        I hope it is okay to send this out on the list-serve.  I am trying to design an insect trap that mixes the Texas cone, the window, and the pan trap.  I pieced together ideas from different papers and pictures that I saw to come up with this idea.  I am hoping to collect more than just bees, although bees are a critical part of my experiment.  The idea is that insects will fly into the plexiglas and either fly up into the cone trap, or fall down into the pan trap.
        It had to be somewhat cheap, easy to set up and take down, and able to withstand some weather.  I'm a brand new grad student, so I welcome any comments and suggestions that you might have on whether this will actually work!

        Thank you,
        Laura Russo






        PhD Student
        Intercollege Graduate Degree Program in Ecology
        Biology Department
        Pennsylvania State University
        University Park, PA 16802

        office: 415 Mueller Lab
        phone: 814-865-7912


      • T'ai Roulston
        ... Hello All: Does anyone have any suggestions as to where to find a few hundred cocoons of Megachile rotundata at this time of year? I have a student who
        Message 6 of 6 , May 26 10:00 AM
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          >
          Hello All:

          Does anyone have any suggestions as to where to find a few hundred
          cocoons of Megachile rotundata at this time of year? I have a student
          who would like to do a pollen bioassay experiment this summer with a
          commercially available (or non-commercial, if someone has a research
          supply) cavity nester and the only one I can think of that might be
          available to forage this summer would be Megachile rotundata. The
          suppliers I talked to don't have any left and also don't like dealing
          with such a small number of cocoons.

          Putting out trap nests here has been remarkably unproductive over the
          years, so I can't count on getting an abundance of any species other
          than mud daubers.

          Any suggestions would be very welcome. I would also like any
          suggestions of native Megachile species in the eastern U.S. that
          anyone has had particular success getting in trap nests as a
          possibility for the future. Megachile rotundata is certainly well
          naturalized in this area, but I would like to have a native cavity
          nester other than Osmia (unless someone knows how to delay Osmia
          emergence successfully for the summer) for research use.

          Thanks for any ideas,
          T'ai


          T'ai Roulston
          Associate Director, Blandy Experimental Farm
          Research Assoc. Professor, Dept Envi Sci. University of Virginia
          400 Blandy Farm Lane
          Boyce, VA 22620
          540 837-1758 ext 276
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