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Honey in Georgia (follow-up)

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  • Claus
    Hi all, I got a number of replies to my previous post. None were certain what the honey could have been, but the main suspect would be any plant sap used in
    Message 1 of 1 , May 12, 2009
      Hi all,

      I got a number of replies to my previous post. None were certain what the honey could have been, but the main suspect would be any plant sap used in Georgia or maybe even bumble bees. However, what I have seen from bumble bees, this is mixed honey and pollen and would not as much resemble honey and the addition of pollen is often a bit acidic; thus, I don't think it could have been bumble bees, but then, who knows after almost 500 years!

      Another book mentioned by Michener in an issue of Melissa-now available online-contain more info on early American honeys, although mostly from tropical stingless bees:

      Purchas S. 1657. A theatre of politicall flying-insects. Wherein especially the nature, the worth, the work, the wonder, and the manner of right-ordering of the bee, is discovered and described. Together with discourses, historical, and observations physical concering them. And in a second part are annexed meditations, and observations theological and moral, in three centuries upon that subject. Thomas Parkhurst: London.

      http://books.google.com/books?id=iLdlAAAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=A+theatre+of+politicall+flying-insects

      Cheers,

      Claus
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