Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [beemonitoring] roads and bees

Expand Messages
  • Cane, Jim
    Gidi- I agree with much of what Harold has written about roads and bees. Alfalfa seed growers who pollinate using the native ground-nesting Nomia melanderi are
    Message 1 of 6 , May 4 2:44 PM
    • 0 Attachment

      Gidi- I agree with much of what Harold has written about roads and bees.  Alfalfa seed growers who pollinate using the native ground-nesting Nomia melanderi are concerned enough with traffic kills of their bees nesting near roads that they have put speed signs around their valley.

       

      NomiaNestingSign.jpg

      ===============================

      James H. Cane

      USDA-ARS Bee Biology and Systematics Lab

      Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 USA

      tel: 435-797-3879   FAX: 435-797-0461

      email: Jim.Cane@... 

      web pages: www.ars.usda.gov/npa/beelab

      http://www.biology.usu.edu/people/facultyinfo.asp?username=jcane

       

      " Always do whatever's next."
      George Carlin

       

    • Doug Yanega
      Harold wrote ... This is definitely true, in both temperate and tropical areas; lots of bees and wasps like bare well-packed soil for nest sites. Unpaved dirt
      Message 2 of 6 , May 4 3:27 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        Harold wrote

        >As to the 'Narrow'; rarely used or 'dirt roads' = They can be
        >excellent nesting sites.

        This is definitely true, in both temperate and tropical areas; lots
        of bees and wasps like bare well-packed soil for nest sites. Unpaved
        dirt roads are generally great for bees. But gravel roads are awful.
        Surprisingly, asphalt roads can be a positive influence: in the local
        deserts, the extra moisture resulting from road-surface spillover
        creates a narrow zone of plants that are greener and more often in
        bloom than those even a meter from the road edge. The actual
        floristic composition of this narrow zone can be dramatically
        different from all of the surrounding habitat - it's always
        surprising to see how big a difference that little extra moisture can
        make.

        Peace,
        --

        Doug Yanega Dept. of Entomology Entomology Research Museum
        Univ. of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0314 skype: dyanega
        phone: (951) 827-4315 (standard disclaimer: opinions are mine, not UCR's)
        http://cache.ucr.edu/~heraty/yanega.html
        "There are some enterprises in which a careful disorderliness
        is the true method" - Herman Melville, Moby Dick, Chap. 82
      • David Inouye
        I ve seen road-killed bumble bees not infrequently. Some on my windshield, some on the road. David Inouye
        Message 3 of 6 , May 4 9:06 PM
        • 0 Attachment
          I've seen road-killed bumble bees not infrequently. Some on my
          windshield, some on the road.

          David Inouye

          At 12:49 PM 5/4/2009, you wrote:


          >Hello everyone. I am looking for information on the effects of roads
          >on bee movement. Exhaustive searches in "Google Scholar" and "Web of
          >Science" yielded only one relevant article (and a few dealing with
          >beetles rather than bees). The rumor says that roads tend to form a
          >barrier to bee movement. Is this true? Is it a complete or only
          >partial barrier? Are all bee taxa similarly affected? Is the effect
          >caused by the asphalt cover, the rapid movement of vehicles, the
          >chemicals emitted by the vehicles, etc.? Would a narrow road, rarely
          >driven through and surrounded by natural vegetation, cause the same
          >effect as a busy highway (I guess not...)?
          >
          >I would appreciate if you could recommend any relevant literature
          >and/or share your own experience and knowledge.
          >
          >Thank you in advance,
          >
          >Gidi Pisanty.
        • Sarina Jepsen
          Hi Gidi, Jennifer Hopwood published a paper last year that may interest you. She looked at bee diversity in restored grasslands on road edges and found that
          Message 4 of 6 , May 5 10:35 AM
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi Gidi,
            Jennifer Hopwood published a paper last year that may interest you. She looked at bee diversity in restored grasslands on road edges and found that "Traffic and width of roadside did not significantly influence bees, suggesting that even relatively narrow verges near heavy traffic could provide valuable habitat to bees."

            Hopwood, J.L. 2008. The contribution of roadside grassland restorations to native bee conservation. Biological Conservation 141: 2632-2640.

            Here is the abstract:
            Marginal habitats such as hedgerows or roadsides become especially important for the conservation of biodiversity in highly modified landscapes. With concerns of a global pollination crisis, there is a need for improving pollinator habitat. Roadsides restored to native prairie vegetation may provide valuable habitat to bees, the most important group of pollinators. Such roadsides support a variety of pollen and nectar sources and unlike agricultural fields, are unplowed, and therefore can provide potential nesting sites for groundnesting bees. To examine potential effects of roadside restoration, bee communities were sampled via aerial netting and pan trapping along roadside prairie restorations as well as roadsides dominated by non-native plants. Management of roadside vegetation via the planting of native species profoundly affected bee communities. Restored roadsides supported significantly greater bee abundances as well as higher species richness compared to weedy roadsides. Floral species richness, floral abundance, and percentage of bare ground were the factors that led to greater bee abundance and bee species richness along restored roadsides. Traffic and width of roadside did not significantly influence bees, suggesting that even relatively narrow verges near heavy traffic could provide valuable habitat to bees. Restored and weedy roadside bee communities were similar to the prairie remnant, but the prairie remnant was more similar in bee richness and abundance to restored roadsides. Restoring additional roadsides to native vegetation could benefit pollinator conservation efforts by improving habitat on the millions of acres of land devoted to roadsides worldwide, land that is already set aside from further development.

            Also, my coworker (Matthew Shepherd) said that Patty Cramer with the USGS Utah Cooperative Fish & Wildlife Research Unit has been collecting information on how roads impact wildlife: www.wildlifeandroads.org

            Best of luck,
            Sarina Jepsen
            ___________________________________________
            The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation

            The Xerces Society is an international, nonprofit
            organization that protects wildlife through the
            conservation of invertebrates and their habitat.
            To join the Society, make a contribution, or read
            about our work, please visit www.xerces.org

            Sarina Jepsen
            Endangered Species Coordinator
            4828 SE Hawthorne Blvd. Portland, OR 97215
            tel: 503-232-6639 fax: 503-233-6794
            email: sarina@...
            ___________________________________________


            Gidi wrote:

            Hello everyone. I am looking for information on the effects of roads on bee movement. Exhaustive searches in "Google Scholar" and "Web of Science" yielded only one relevant article (and a few dealing with beetles rather than bees). The rumor says that roads tend to form a barrier to bee movement. Is this true? Is it a complete or only partial barrier? Are all bee taxa similarly affected? Is the effect caused by the asphalt cover, the rapid movement of vehicles, the chemicals emitted by the vehicles, etc.? Would a narrow road, rarely driven through and surrounded by natural vegetation, cause the same effect as a busy highway (I guess not...)?

            I would appreciate if you could recommend any relevant literature and/or share your own experience and knowledge.

            Thank you in advance,

            Gidi Pisanty.



            __________ Information from ESET Smart Security, version of virus signature database 4052 (20090504) __________

            The message was checked by ESET Smart Security.

            http://www.eset.com
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.