Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Collecing bees in managed apple orchards

Expand Messages
  • siddharth188
    Hello everyone, Thought to share my experience of collecting bees in apple orchards. I set out bowls (3.25 oz.) on Thursday (April 23) and since then
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 27, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello everyone,

      Thought to share my experience of collecting bees in apple orchards. I set out bowls (3.25 oz.) on Thursday (April 23) and since then temperatures have been really nice and on 2 days have even climbed above 90. I checked the bowls on Sunday (April 26) and all I could see was flies, maybe 1 or 2 bees in 1 out of 10 bowls. Now, I am thinking to leave them out till April 28 or more (depending on weather). Orchards that we are using are managed ones so owners have colonies of honeybees in every block and you can see honeybees everywhere, on every tree. So, I was wondering if anyone has run into a similar situation of working in apple orchards loaded with honeybees – because there could be a possibility that honeybees might be competiting with native pollinators.

      Thanks in advance,
      Sidd
    • Crumbling.Deana@epamail.epa.gov
      Sidd, I ve noticed that when there are lots of flowers around, not surprisingly, the bees are much more interested in the flowers than the bee bowls. Maybe
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 27, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Sidd,

        I've noticed that when there are lots of flowers around, not
        surprisingly, the bees are much more interested in the flowers than the
        bee bowls. Maybe scent plays a role. I wonder if anyone has ever tried
        adding a floral scent to the water?

        --Deana



        From: "siddharth188" <stiwari@...>

        To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com

        Date: 04/27/2009 08:37 AM

        Subject: [beemonitoring] Collecing bees in managed apple orchards













        Hello everyone,

        Thought to share my experience of collecting bees in apple orchards. I set out
        bowls (3.25 oz.) on Thursday (April 23) and since then temperatures have been
        really nice and on 2 days have even climbed above 90. I checked the bowls on
        Sunday (April 26) and all I could see was flies, maybe 1 or 2 bees in 1 out of 10
        bowls. Now, I am thinking to leave them out till April 28 or more (depending on
        weather). Orchards that we are using are managed ones so owners have colonies of
        honeybees in every block and you can see honeybees everywhere, on every tree. So,
        I was wondering if anyone has run into a similar situation of working in apple
        orchards loaded with honeybees – because there could be a possibility that
        honeybees might be competiting with native pollinators.

        Thanks in advance,
        Sidd
      • Cane, Jim
        Sidd- I have nesting Osmia lignaria flying at my older suburban home. They forage on apples and crabapples at my house and those of neighbors. They are
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 27, 2009
        • 0 Attachment

          Sidd- I have nesting Osmia lignaria flying at my older suburban home.  They forage on apples and crabapples at my house and those of neighbors.  They are outnumbered by honeybees on these trees, but I nonetheless typically manage a 2-4x population increase annually, depending on weather (yesterday’s snow was not helpful!).  At some point of course bees can be overstocked…a look at who is still getting pollen in the afternoon might be telling.

           

          jim

           

          ===============================

          James H. Cane

          USDA-ARS Bee Biology and Systematics Lab

          Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 USA

          tel: 435-797-3879   FAX: 435-797-0461

          email: Jim.Cane@... 

          web pages: www.ars.usda.gov/npa/beelab

          http://www.biology.usu.edu/people/facultyinfo.asp?username=jcane

           

          " Always do whatever's next."
          George Carlin

           

        • nancy lee adamson
          Hi, Sidd, I ve been monitoring apples and very little turns up in bowls. I suggest netting at flower. There does seem to be a different mix in the morning
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 27, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi, Sidd,

            I've been monitoring apples and very little turns up in bowls.  I suggest netting at flower.  There does seem to be a different mix in the morning and afternoon, so if you can net for at least 15 min in the a.m. and again in the p.m., I am sure you'll find a lot.  Seems like when I first arrive at a spot, there's little visible, but if I just stand observing, then they start showing up.  You might want to just take notes observing for a while (an hour or so in the a.m. and p.m.) so you'll get so see what's coming to the flowers. 

            Nancy

            On Mon, Apr 27, 2009 at 11:19 AM, Cane, Jim <Jim.Cane@...> wrote:


            Sidd- I have nesting Osmia lignaria flying at my older suburban home.  They forage on apples and crabapples at my house and those of neighbors.  They are outnumbered by honeybees on these trees, but I nonetheless typically manage a 2-4x population increase annually, depending on weather (yesterday’s snow was not helpful!).  At some point of course bees can be overstocked…a look at who is still getting pollen in the afternoon might be telling.

             

            jim

             

            ===============================

            James H. Cane

            USDA-ARS Bee Biology and Systematics Lab

            Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 USA

            tel: 435-797-3879   FAX: 435-797-0461

            email: Jim.Cane@... 

            web pages: www.ars.usda.gov/npa/beelab

            http://www.biology.usu.edu/people/facultyinfo.asp?username=jcane

             

            " Always do whatever's next."
            George Carlin

             


          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.