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Re: [beemonitoring] Collembola collect pollen

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  • Malinda Slagle
    As Dr. Bernhardt and most of you probably already figured out, the below blog is actually an April fool s joke blog. The corbicula on the Collembola was
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 2, 2009
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      As Dr. Bernhardt and most of you probably already figured out, the below
      blog is actually an April fool's joke blog. The corbicula on the
      Collembola was photoshopped on and the two lineages of social
      Collembola, Gregarioistominae (Isotomidae) and Apisminthurini
      (Sminthuridae), were completely made up.
      I was taken in by it, and my entomologist friends had a good laugh at my
      ignorance of Collembola.
      -Malinda Slagle
      Restoration Ecologist
      Litzsinger Road Ecology Center
      Missouri Botanical Garden
      St. Louis MO 63124


      Peter Bernhardt wrote:
      >
      > Dear Joe:
      >
      >
      > The site (below) took me by complete surprise. There are a few odd
      > papers that show that Collembola pollinate the small flowers of some
      > small trees in shrubs living in tropical asian mangrove swamps. An
      > old, old paper insists they are pollinators of the flowers that ripen
      > to give us black and white peppercorns. This did take me by complete
      > surprise, though, and I never knew that some Collembola have areas on
      > their hind legs where they store pollen! Considering the fossil record
      > of these insects one wonders, now, if insect-pollination derives
      > originally from early interactions between seed plants and wingless
      > insects?
      >
      > There is current call for papers in the online journal, "Psyche."
      > it's supposed to be an issue devoted to pollination by poorly studied
      > colonial insects. Is "Psyche" planning a series of papers on
      > pollination by these colonial springtails? I was asked to send in a
      > ms. and presumed they wanted our study on vespid wasp pollination of
      > Paeonia brownii.
      >
      > Meanwhile, you will be pleased to learn that the Missouri Department
      > of Conservation funded our proposal for the full $60,000 over three
      > years. We will be looking at the reproductive ecology of the
      > endangered prairie perennial, Asclepias meadii. An incoming PhD
      > candidate has expressed her interest in the project. The only major
      > change to the project is that the MDC now wants us working on
      > populations in Kansas instead of Missouri. As it's now a bi-state
      > study based on federal funds (administered by a Missouri Department)
      > logistics and rules may become a bit complicated.
      >
      > Peter
      >
      > ---------- Forwarded message ----------
      > From: *Joseph Fortier* <josephfortier@...
      > <mailto:josephfortier@...>>
      > Date: Wed, Apr 1, 2009 at 10:55 PM
      > Subject: collembiculture?
      > To: Peter Bernhardt <bernhap2@... <mailto:bernhap2@...>>
      >
      >
      > HEy Peter,
      > What do you think of this (sent to Richard Thoma of the Webster Groves
      > Nature Study Society/Entomology section by James Trager):
      > http://blogs.lib.ncsu.edu/roller/insects/entry/new_pollinators_for_systems_affected
      > <http://blogs.lib.ncsu.edu/roller/insects/entry/new_pollinators_for_systems_affected>
      >
      > Cheers,
      > Joe
      >
      >
      >
    • Peter Bernhardt
      Dear Malinda: Well, sure fell for that one. Who says the April Fools joke is dead? Peter 2009/4/2 Joseph Fortier
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 3, 2009
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        Dear Malinda:

        Well, sure fell for that one.  Who says the April Fools joke is dead?

        Peter

        2009/4/2 Joseph Fortier <josephfortier@...>
        Well, so much for me and my entomologist friends!!



        On Thu, Apr 2, 2009 at 12:54 PM, Malinda Slagle <malinda.slagle@...> wrote:
        As Dr. Bernhardt and most of you probably already figured out, the below blog is actually an April fool's joke blog.  The corbicula on the Collembola was photoshopped on and the two lineages of social Collembola, Gregarioistominae (Isotomidae) and Apisminthurini (Sminthuridae), were completely made up.
        I was taken in by it, and my entomologist friends had a good laugh at my ignorance of Collembola.
        -Malinda Slagle
        Restoration Ecologist
        Litzsinger Road Ecology Center
        Missouri Botanical Garden
        St. Louis MO 63124


        Peter Bernhardt wrote:

        Dear Joe:


        The site (below) took me by complete surprise.  There are a few odd papers that show that Collembola pollinate the small flowers of some small trees in shrubs living in tropical asian mangrove swamps.  An old, old paper insists they are pollinators of the flowers that ripen to give us black and white peppercorns.  This did take me by complete surprise, though, and I never knew that some Collembola have areas on their hind legs where they store pollen! Considering the fossil record of these insects one wonders, now, if insect-pollination derives originally from early interactions between seed plants and wingless insects?

        There is  current call for papers in the online journal, "Psyche."  it's supposed to be an issue devoted to pollination by poorly studied colonial insects.  Is "Psyche" planning a series of papers on pollination by these colonial springtails?  I was asked to send in a ms. and presumed they wanted our study on vespid wasp pollination of Paeonia brownii.

        Meanwhile, you will be pleased to learn that the Missouri Department of Conservation funded our proposal for the full $60,000 over three years.  We will be looking at the reproductive ecology of the endangered prairie perennial, Asclepias meadii.  An incoming PhD candidate has expressed her interest in the project.  The only major change to the project is that the MDC now wants us working on populations in Kansas instead of Missouri.  As it's now a bi-state study based on federal funds (administered by a Missouri Department) logistics and rules may become a bit complicated.

        Peter

        ---------- Forwarded message ----------
        From: *Joseph Fortier* <josephfortier@... <mailto:josephfortier@...>>
        Date: Wed, Apr 1, 2009 at 10:55 PM
        Subject: collembiculture?
        To: Peter Bernhardt <bernhap2@... <mailto:bernhap2@...>>


        HEy Peter,
        What do you think of this (sent to Richard Thoma of the Webster Groves Nature Study Society/Entomology section by James Trager):





        --
        Joseph C. Fortier
        Treasurer
        International Society of Hymenopterists
        phone: (509) 313-6051
        FAX: (509) 313- 5819

      • frozenbeedoc@cs.com
        Had me going as well. April Fool s never dies.
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 3, 2009
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          Had me going as well.  April Fool's never dies.
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